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COMPL»ME-MTs 



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BUFJE^ 



SECRETARY. 




SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 



State Bureau of Labor Statistics 



CONCERNING 



ILLIl 

1898, 



CONTAINING THE 



FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORTS 



STATE INSPECTORS OF MINES, 



David Ross, Secrefary. 



3 1129 00246 1820 



SPRINGFIELD. ILL.: 
Phillips Bros.. State' Printers. 



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ILLI(\IUI6 5/rt/t imAHY. 



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COMMISSIONERS OF LABOR. 

1898. 

P. H. Donnelly, President, Chicago. 
Thomas D. Kelligar, Pana. 
Samuel M. Dalzell, Spring Valley. 
R. Smith, Flora. 
L. W. Fribourg, Decatur. 

Secretarrj, 
David Ross. Sringfield. 



STATE BOARD OF EXAMINERS. 



1898. 

Richard Newsam, President, Peoria. 
James Taylor, Edwards. 
Cochran Johnston. Spring Valley. 
Patrick McCann, Lincoln. 
Hugh Murray. M. E., Nashville. 

Secreiarij, 
Eben Howells. Bract-ville. 



STATE INSPECTOES OF MINES. 



Hector McAllister, First District, Streator. 
Thomas Hudson, Second District, Galva. 
John W. Graham, Third District. Dunfermline. 
John E. Williams, Fourth District, Danville. 
Walton Rutledge, Fifth District, Alton. 
John Dunlop, Sixth District, Centralia. 
Evan D. John, Seventh District, Carbondale. 



State of Illinois. 
Office of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 

Springfield, January 1, 1899. 

Honorable John R. Tanner, Governor of Illinois: 

Sir:— On behalf of the Board of Commissioners of Labor, I have 
the honor to submit herewith the Annual Reports of the State In- 
spectors of Coal Mines for the year ending July 1, 1898, together 
with summary and analytical tables for the State at large compiled 
in this office and other matters relevant to the general subject of 
■coal mining in Illinois. 

Very respectfully, 

David Ross, 

Secretary. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



REVIEW OF THE MINING SITUATION— 1898 1 

Statistics of the State for the Year IS 

Classification of Mines 21 

The Output for the Year 28 

Output by Counties 31 

Disposition of Output 33 

Distribution of Coal to Railroads 40 

The possible Output of existing Mines 48 

Day s of Active Operation 49 

Average Value of Coal 51 

Mine Employes 53 

Prices Paid for Mining 55 

Machine Mining 59 

Consumption of Powder t!3 

Fatal Accidents in Mines 05 

Non-Fatal Accidents 72 

CoHclusion 78 

Recapitulation by Districts 80 

REPORTS OF STATE INSPECTORS OF MINES: 
First Inspection District— ffecfor McAllister, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 85 

Fatal Casualties 87 

Non-Fatal Casualties 91 

Statistics of Grundy, Kankakee, LaSalle, Livingston, and Will Counties 94 

Recapitulation by Counties 100 

Second Inspection District— r7<o>/;«.s Hudson, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 103 

Fatal Casualties 105 

Non-Fatal Casualties 109 

Statistics of Bureau, Henry, Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Rock Island, Stark, and Wood- 
ford Counties 112 

Recapitulation by Counties 128 

Third Inspection District— J"o7(/i W. Graliatn, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 131 

Fatal Casualties 132 

Non-Fatal Casualties 134 

Statistics of Brown. Fulton, Hancock, Knox. McDonough, Schuyler, and Warren 

Counties 136 

Recapitulation by Counties 151 

Fourth Inspection District— Jo^o? E. Williams, Inspector. 

Text of the Report 153 

Fatal Casualties 155 

Non-Fatal Casualties 160 

Statistics of Cass, Logan, Macon, McLean, 3Ienard, Tazewell, and Vermilion Counties 164 

Recapitulation by Counties 174 



Fifth l^'^^PECTIO^■ DiSTiiiCT— Walton h'utlchje, In.<p^<:tor. 

Text of the Report 177 

Fatal Casualties ISO 

Noil-Fatal Casualties 18U 

Statistics of Calhoun, Christian, Green, Jersey, Morgan, Macoupin, Montjfomery, 

Scott, Santramon, and Shelby Counties 184 

Recapitulation by Counties lOG 

Sixth Inspection District— ./o/(h Dunlop. Inspector- 

Text of the Report lO'.i 

Fatal Casualties 202 

Non-Fatal Casualties 204 

Statistics of Bond, Clinton, Madison, Marion, and St. Clair Counties 208 

Recapitulation by Counties 216 

Seventh Inspection District— A'ctoi D. -lohn. Inspector. 

Text of the Report 219 

Fatal Casualties 220 

Non-Fatal Casualties 225 

Statistics of Gallatin, Hamilton. Jackson, Jefferson. Johnson, Ferry, Randolph, Sa- 
line, Washington, and Williamson Counties 228 

Recapitulation by Counties 238 

APPENDIX. 

Register of Certificated— 

Jline Managers 213 

Hoisting Engineers 250 

Fire Bosses 257 

Report of Inspection Fees— 

First District 259 

Second District 262 

Third District 264 

Fourth District 267 

Fifth District 269 

Sixth District 272 

Seventh District 275 

Recapitulation of Inspections and Fees, by Districts 278 



REVIEW OF THE MINING SITUATION— 1898. 



The prolonged suspension which occurred last year throughout 
the principal bitiminous coal districts of the country, supplemented 
this year by a local reign of terror at Pana, and the more unfortunate 
tragedy at Virden, in this State, has attracted widespread and inter- 
ested attention to the new conditions surrounding the mining indus- 
try, and the influences, whether for better or worse, that have quietly 
but effectively operated to change its character. 

No one familiar with the general mining methods of the present 
will dispute the statement that the occupation of the old-time miner 
has practically . been destroyed. This result has been gradually 
reached, partly through the discovery and application of easier meth- 
ods of mining consequent upon the introduction of machinery, but 
principally on account of the system that, from considerations of iii;- 
raediate business and profit, it was presumed more advantageous to 
encourage and prefer the employment of a less superior class of work- 
men. 

Employers chafed under the imaginary restraints imposed by the 
higher demands of the well disciplined tradesman. To resist this 
force and perfect the other policy, liberal inducements were offered 
to a certain class of European workmen, whose meagre necessities 
made it comparatively easy to comply with their moderate wage de- 
mands. 

It was assumed that the substitution of the new for the old work- 
man would not only reduce the former wage standard, but destroy 
the possibility of future resistance by rendering more difiicult the 
success of organized effort. Thus the process of displacement contin- 
ued until fully 60 per cent of the workers in and around the mines 
are men who are almost strangers to the English tongue, many of 
whom have but recontly, and in most instances imp3rfectly. learned 
the new and less difficult art of producing coal. Those responsible 
for this change in the personnel of the mining fraternity have had 



2 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

occasion in late years to learn the important, though painful, lesson, 
that while wholesale importations of cheaper labor served the tem- 
porary purpose of breaking the high American wage line, their 
potentialities in the way of subsequent assimilation had not been 
thoroughly considered, and the later consciousness of the purp(jses 
for which the}' had been used created in time a somewhat vindictive 
reaction, which, encoumged by the remaining influence of those they 
superceded, is now expressing itself in persistent, organized demands 
for better conditions. 

Recent experience demonstrates that this force is capable of being 
mobilized and that it can be relied upon to cooi)erate with the older 
miners in support of the last argument, namely, the right to strike. 
This early and rather unexpected condition, viewed from the wage 
earner's standpoint, renders the future of the craft more hoj^ef ul than 
it could otherwise be considered, and demands some responsive action 
on the part of the employers. 

We have got away from the old policy of local settlements. Profits 
from mining investments are now too small to permit of sectional ad- 
justments. Competition's unrelenting sway has made common vic- 
tims of ail. Capacity to produce in excess of market demands, 
together with modern transportation facilities, have, to a great extent, 
removed the favored competitor and x^laced all on, a basis of approxi- 
mate equality. 

It is this seemingly unnatural condition of business that makes 
iwssible the fierce competition between the mines of West Virginia 
and those of Illinois in the markets of the northwest. 

In view of this situation, what relief is there for those interested in 
this industry except through a broader and more perfect union of 
forces? Despite all philosophy, self-interest colors, and often controls, 
our judgment. Those who a few years ago opposed the exactions of 
unionism should not now be charged with inconsistency for regarding 
it as a necessary means of self- protection. New evils, whether self- 
inflicted or not, suggest new methods of treatment. The present plan 
of joint action, as indicated by the proposed inter state conferences of 
miners and operators, for the purpose of agreeing as to rates of wages 
and other terms of employment, is not a new one. That system was 
first tried over twelve years ago, when it was the writer's privilege to 
^participate in the proceedings of the initial meeting. For some time 
success attended the movement and extravagant hopes were enter- 
tained as to the future effects on the industry. In the course of time 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 6 

■opposition to the scale fixed by the inter state convention asserted 
itself, particularly as api)lyin^- to the rate at that time agreed upon 
for the Grape Creek field. Mine owners tlien in the extreme eastern 
part of the State insisted that the rate fixed was unfair; that they 
could not meet the competition of western Indiana. This disao-ree- 
nient resulted in a year's strike. The contest bankrupted the com- 
pany, but it also compelled the operators of Illinois to withdraw from 
:tlie inter state conferences. 

This experience need not discourage the friends of these methods, 
l)ut it serves to call attention to the comx-)lex and difficult character of 
the questions with which the representatives of the mining industry 
are now forced to deal. The stubborn attitude of the mine owners at 
Pana, in the present crisis, corresponds substantially with the resist- 
ance offered by the Grape Creek operators twelve years ago, and a 
settlement effected at Pana, adverse to the miners, may, to some ex- 
•tent, control and disturb the deliberations of future scale conventions. 

It is rather a sad commentary on the power and judgment of a con- 
vention representing the interest of four or five important coal states 
vyhen one displeased individual or comijany can defeat the general 
plan, and through his or its opposition, force several hundred thousand 
miners to accei^t a reduced mining rate. 

This has ])een the effect of former disagreements, and similar re- 
sults may l)e anticipated until the administrative details of the or- 
ganization are perfected in such a manner as to guarantee a greater 
measure of protection to those who are willing to be governed by the 
action of such bodies, and also the necessary power to control and 
discipline those who unreasonably refuse to cooperate. When miners 
and operators thoroughly realize that the present contest is one for 
the preservation of their industry, it should need no argument to in- 
duce them to create an emergency fund that could be easily and 
speedily raised and used against recalcitrant operators and miners 
for the purpose of enforcing their decrees. 

A charital:>le disposition to give each competitor a reasonable .share 
of a limited market has made prominent the question of transporta- 
tion charges, thus forcing the formulation of a scale based on the 
theory of guarding the interests of the least favored operator. 
Miners have consented and accepted the policy, seemingly uncon- 
scious of the limitations it imimses in the important matter of atl- 
vancing wages. 



4 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Under prevailing methods, general mining rates are determined, not 
on the average but on the most unfavorable existing conditions. The 
plant furthest removed from the market, and for other reasons most 
expensive to operate, limits and defines the possible advance. This 
is particularly true considering the failure so far to materially enhance 
the selling price of coal, and where advantages to the industry result 
from greater economy in production. 

It would seem necessary, in order to insure the future success and 
permanency of the plan now being tried, either to form an alliance 
with the transportation companies, a most difficult undertaking, or 
ignore altogether the factor of freight charges and fix a mining rate 
based on the earning capacity of the mine. This presupposes an 
equalization of wages, which is really the object sought in the present 
movement, and probably the abandonment of some unprofitable mines. 

This plan, like the other, is not new, as it is now in operation in 
some of the large mining districts of England, where, according to re- 
ports, it has given general satisfaction. Of the results thus far ac- 
complished by the present system there can not be two opinions. It 
has created ])etween the operators and operatives a stronger feeling 
of conmion fellowship. Direct personal contact has helped to destroy 
the old spirit of animosity. Aside from the advance in mining rates 
secured by this process, many important concessions have been made. 
The right to unite for craft protection has not only been publicly 
recognized but reciprocated and encouraged. Through the medium 
of joint conferences have come many changes that wage earners have 
long worked and waited for. The establishment of the eight hour 
work day will, in time, be equivalent to an increase in wages. It will 
not only furnish additional opportunities for physical, moral and in- 
tellectual improvement, but relieve the pressure of an overstocked 
market, which in turn will exert its proper effect on the value of the 
miner's product. This is a permanent change for good, as there is 
no precedent in modern history warranting the thought of ever again 
returning to the old system. All tendencies are in the other direc- 
tion. 

Part of the agreement reached at Chicago last January provided 
that the wages of coal miners should be paid semi-monthly. After 
years of agitation the miners win through friendly intercourse what 
had frequently been denied them by the courts. The system of 
weighing and paying for coal on the basis of gross weight, so far as 
the miners of this State are concerned, was also conceded. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 5 

Thus have been removed many of the grievances prolific of much 
former discontent, by mutual methods more binding than legal enact- 
ments and without the friction of the law's enforcement. 

More or less opposition was expected in the enforcement of an inter 
state mining scale, first, on the part of those who, while subject to its 
provisions, were not representod at the conference, and who did not 
■consider themselves bound by its decisions; and second, on the part 
of mine owners who, while participating in the proceedings, felt that 
the action taken was prejudicial to their interests. 

This State experienced both phases of the difficulty. The Chicago- 
Virden Coal Co., represented at the Chicago meeting, and certain coal 
comi)anies at Pana, claiming that they were not represented, both re- 
fused to recognize the authority of the convention or to comiily with 
the scale. While anticipating some local resistance, the methods 
adopted by the opposition created surprise, particularly as they in- 
voked the exercise of a new executive function. The Virden Coal Co. 
expressed its readiness to sustain its contention that it was impossible 
for them to operate and pay the scale by suljmitting its claims to the 
judgment of the State Board of Arbitration, and signed a contract 
with the members of said Board to abide l)y the award. After sev- 
eral days' session the Board, c<uisidering the evidence presented, de- 
<"ided that the comx^any could pay the 40-cent rate fixed for that field 
and operate at a profit. 

Notwithstanding the written contract the comijany repudiated the 
decision and continued the contest. Later, at the request of the com- 
pany, a committee from the national executive l)oard of the United 
Mine Workers was selected, with authority from the general union to 
take evidence and agree upon a mining i^rice for that company. This 
committee, on a complete and detailed consideration of ail the facts, 
affirmed the decision of the State Arbitration Board, and again the 
company declined to comply with the verdict. Having taken the 
<!ase to the court of last appeal, the company persisted in viohiting its 
written agreement. 

At Pana the situation was somewhat different, inasmuch as the com- 
panies there absolutely refused to subnut the questions at issue to any 
committee or to any board of arbitration, basing their action on the old 
a.ssumption that the ])ooks of those corporations were private property 
and the State had n(jt the right to even request that they be examined. 

Between the conduct of a corporation that deliberately violated its 
contracts and one that denied that the State or the public had any 



6 ' STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

interest in the management of its business affairs, it is somewhat dif- 
ficult to judge. Yet, from a standpoint of consistency, the latter's 
course was the most commendable. Of the twenty mines in the State 
which refused to pay the scale rate for mining, those at Virden and 
Pana excited the most interest on account of the policy pursued to 
defeat the plan of the inter state convention. 

During the brief life of the movement some very interesting devel- 
opments have occurred and important issues i^resented. While the 
suspension of last year was in j^rogress certain coal comijanies in the 
State attempted to terminate it Ijy the importation of Chinamen, but 
on learning that Governor Tanner, as the controlling power of the 
State's military forces, refused to become a partner to this assault on 
the interests of society, the plan was abandoned, notwithstanding the 
contract for their transportation had been signed. 

This intimation of the Governor's position on the question of im- 
porting labor into the State was evidently misunderstood by the ob- 
streperous mine owners at Virden, who, with due notice of what would 
result, deliberately proceeded to construct a stockade about the mine 
and attemi)ted to import negroes from the south, many of them ex- 
convicts, and all under the protection of foreign guns. Governor 
Tanner promptly and correctly interpreted this demonstration as a 
direct challenge to the State government, and at once ordered the 
militia there, not as other governors have done, to protect the mine 
owners in operating their plants with such labor, but with strict in- 
structions not to permit their disembarkation at Virden. 

This is the first time in the history of the State or of the nation 
that the military power of the law, during an industrial contest, has 
been exercised in defense of the rights of American labor. 

It is not to be wondered at that interests long accustomed to the 
l^rotection of the military in their battles with laboring men should 
be inexiaressibly shocked at this new exjDression of executive power. 
Can the capitalistic press that have so bitterly assailed the Governor 
for his action in the Virden strike defend their position without at 
the same time ajDproving a policy that militates against the best in- 
terests of society? However disagreeable this attitude may appear, 
it is well that the real sentiments of the moneyed press should be 
clearly defined. This class was not interested in ascertaining the 
facts or considering the ethical features of the situation. It was 
enough for them to know that a criminal conspiracy to reduce wages 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 7 

through the importation of convict workmen had been defeated by 
the courage and conscience of the present chief executive of the 
State. 

Great misapprehension existed concerning tlie status of the diffi- 
culty at Virden. It was represented that the miners were striking 
against a reduction of wages, and those who were willing to accept 
the terms offered by the company should be protected from molesta- 
tion. Tlie facts are, the miners were not on strike. They were wil- 
ling to resume at the rate fixed for that field by the convention at 
winch their employers were represented. They were locked out be- 
cause the mine owners refused to pay the advanced mining rate 
conceded by their competitors. 

Again, those who attempted to take the place of the locked-out 
miners did not move of their own volition, but came as an army, some 
of them in cattle cars, and all under the protection of Winchesters in 
the iDossession of men disqualified to perform police duty under the 
laws of this State. 

Governor Tanner, in a speech delivered at Trenton, November 7, 
189S, reviewing the situation and assigning reasons warranting the 
a;ction taken, spoke in part as follows: 

"In a discussion of the Virden riot, two questions present themselves for 
decision: First, were the proprietors of the Virden mine justified, under the 
existing circumstances, in bringing labor from any other point, in or out of 
the State of Illinois, to take the places of the coal miners already on the 
ground? Second, was the form, as well as the substance, of their action in 
the premises in accord with the statutes, or did they act in an unlawful 
manner? 

"As to the first of these questions, it must be remembered that the Virden 
mine was represented in the Interstate and State Mining Congress, called to 
agree upon a scale of prices to be paid by the owners for bituminous coal in 
every district of the competitive area, which extended in a general way from 
West Virginia to Illinois. That convention was authorized to fix the price of 
mining coal wherever found in that area, having regard to local conditions in 
each district, such as depth and thickness of vein, the quality of coal, dis- 
tance from the market, and other physical conditions. If it had no such 
authority it was a solemn farce and fraud upon its face, and its conclusions 
could have no binding effect upon the owners of the mines or the operatives. 
Its action, of course, could have no binding effect in any event upon the 
owners of mines not represented in this congress, and it is to be assumed that 
the representatives of each district reserved the right to withdraw from the 
deliberations of the body at any stage of the proceedings, if dissatisfied with 
its conclusions and recommendations. 



8 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

"The Virden and Pana mines were represented at Sprino^field. They had 
a voice, bj^ their representatives, in the deliberations of the conference, and 
their representatives did not withdraw or ^ive notice of a purpose to refuse 
to abide by the scale of wages there assented to and adopted, and now in 
force in all other parts of this State. This agreement has all the essential 
features of a contract, the contractins: parties being the mine owners, as a 
brvdy. on the one hqnr!. r>r>r\ tlT^ minr^r.;. nc r. h'-^^y^ o^i '■'■^■^ '^>*^'t"'V. 

"Personally, I believe that employes and laboring men have the same 
natural and legal right to form combinations for the purpose of maintaining a 
living wage that emploj^ers have to combine in order to keep up the price of 
their manufactured products and to keep down the price of labor. 

"It appears to me that of all obligations that can be formed, none is so 
justifiable, or expedient, or sacred, as an agreement in which the employers 
of labor and their employes unite upon equal terms and have a common in- 
terest. That was precisely the character of the agreement reached at Spring- 
field, to which the Yirden and Pana mine owners were parties. 

"A.t this point I must be permitted to make another distinction of great 
importance in the elucidation of this somewhat ethical and legal problem. I 
have been greatly misunderstood and misrepresented as to my official attitude 
touching the controversy between the owners of the Virden property and 
their employes. Let me explain it as best 1 can. No lawyer or business man 
will contend for a moment that under the terras of the Springfield agreement 
these gentlemen were under any legal obligation to operate their mine at any 
pecuniary loss. They claimed that it would be impossible for them to suc- 
cessfully compete with their business rivals at the rate of wages for mining 
coal fixed for their district by that convention, and suspended operations. 
Other mines, however, in the same field, with similar physical conditions, for 
instance, all those in Sangamon, Logan, Macon and Menard counties, car- 
ried out the Springfield contr.ict and paid the scale of 40 cents per ton, and I 
believe (and I have heard nothing to the contrary), are running at a profit. 

"The Virden operators then made an offer of a lower rate— 25 cents per 
ton— which was refused. The situation, therefore, was not a strike by the 
miners, as is charged in the public prints, but was a 'lockout' by the mine 
owners. It existed, not by the choice of the miners, but by that of the mine 
owners. When it became as intolerable to the latter as it had long been to 
the former, they took steps to end it by bringing in cheap labor to take the 
place of the men already upon the ground. 

"No one, I think, possessed of the ordinary sensibilities and sympathies of 
a normal human being can contemplate the condition of the workingman 
who is both able and willing to work and who can not find remunerative em- 
ployment without experiencing the emotion of pity. The ease of the work- 
ingman is peculiarly distressing when, in order to secure employment, he is 
compelled to sever the ties which bind him to the community of which he is 
a member, to srll the little home bought and partly paid for with his scanty 
savings — the home in which his children were born, and from which possibly 
some of them have been carried to their premature graves in the village ceme- 
tery — and to go forth once more into the cold world a wanderer and a fugi- 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. » 

tive, exposed to the charge from the mouths of strangers that he is a pauper and 
a tramp, and a suspicion that his condition is the result of his own vices, in- 
dolence and self indulgent extravagance. If the workingman strikes, in the 
hope of bettering his condition, he takes the risk of failure and its conse- 
quences to himself: and his family, so that, while we feel compassion for him, 
we nevertheless regard his fate as the fortune of war. 

"Bnt those Virden miners did not strike; therefore thp\^ ar^ donhly wo^^t-hy 
of pity; and though we grant that the mine owners had the legal right to 
further oppress these laboring men, I contend that they did not have the 
moral right to de so. It was an act of tyranny, for which they must account 
to their consciences and to their God. If it is sought to justify it upon the 
ground of the exigencies of business, all I have to say is that men have no 
right to crush the life out of other men for the sake of money. It is some- 
times a man's duty to fail in business when success is attained only through 
wrong-doing. 

"As I view the situation at Virden and Paua, the mine owners there were 
not bound by the terms of the Springfield agreement to operate their mine.s 
at a loss. But they were morally bound to keep their contract and pay the 
scale or close the mines, regardless of consequences to themselves. They 
had, of course, a right to operate them at a reduction from the scale if their 
employes would consent to such reduction, but not otherwise. This consent 
they failed to secure. When they went to Alabama for miners they may not 
have transcended their legal right, but they stepped across the line which 
marks the boundary between ethical and unethical conduct. The instinct of 
their former employes told the latter that they were wronged, and they felt 
the indignation which universally follows the sense of an attempted personal 
injury and injustice. Every laboring man in the United States who knows 
the facts felt precisely as they did. 

"The action of the Virden mine-owners was. moreover, contrary to public 
policy. The attempt has been made, for political reasons, to make it appear 
that my position in opposing the introduction of Alabama miners into the Vir- 
den mine was based upon their color. No negro of average intelligence and 
honesty will be deceived by this insinuation. I am as free as any man from 
color and race prejudice. I am the only Governor in the United States who 
sent to the field, in response to the call of the President for volunteers, a 
negro regiment, officered by negroes, with a negro colonel at its head. That 
charge, at best, must fall to the ground. The Republican party is and has 
always been and will long continue to be the negro's best and only political 
friend. But I know, as every well informed man knows, that the coal mining 
industry in Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama has been developed under the 
able lead of a syndicate of capitalists who were the lessees of convict labor in 
all the three states named; that convicts, white and black, in the south, have 
been and are employed in these syndicate mines, and that originally there 
were few, if any, coal miners in these states who did not acquire the knowl- 
edge of their trade in those mines while under sentence for crime. It is im- 
possible to believe that any wholesale importation of miners from the south 



10 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

into any northern state can occur without the introduction into our communities 
of a most undesirable element of the population — not because they are negroes, 
but because they are ex convicts. 

"But if all that 1 have said thus far should be dismissed from consideration 
as irrelevant or inconclusive, the fact remains, even though it should be con- 
ceded that they had a legal right to bring this labor into the State, that they 
proceeded to do so in an illegal manner, and after notification from the high- 
est authority in the State — its Chief Executive — that their action was calculated 
to provoke riot and bloodshed. They can not evade the responsibility for the 
fatal issue of the Virden riot by hiding behind the constitution of the United 
States. That noble instrument was never designed to be a shield for tyranny 
and murder. 

"Did these negroes come here as free men? Or were they brought here as 
slaves? Free men, on a lawful and peaceable errand, need no arms and no 
hired protection up an any foot of soil covered by the American flag. Men in 
a locked car are not free men, but prisoners. These men were prisoners with- 
out authority of law. They were under no criminal charge, had not been 
tried, and were entitled to go and come at their pleasure. The men who, un- 
der the guise of their protectors, were in fact their jailers, had no legal 
authority to bear or use arms. They were outlaws. A lawful purpose can be 
carried out under the protection of law without the aid of hired thugs and 
assassins. Who hired these assassins? What right had they to hire them"/ 
They were not even citizens of this State, but armed invaders of its soil — fifty 
or sixty of them, armed with repeating Winchester rifles loaded with powder 
and ball, invading our State for the purpose of shooting— and they did shoot 
down — our citizens. 

"I am a man of peace, but there is one thing which I value more highly 
than the public peace, and that is public justice." 

This statement presents ia a clear and forcible manner all the facts 
of the case, and thoroughly destroys the criticism of an unfriendly 
press. With the prouress of modern opinion comes new responsibili- 
ties which men active in the sphere of industry or politics can neither 
ignore nor avoid. Our complex system of industrial life has revolu- 
tionized ancient notions and imposed additional duties, principal 
among which is the recognition that the peace and interest of the 
jmblic must be conserved, even at the cost of denying certain abstract 
individual privileges— not on the thecn-y of "'the greatest good to the 
greatest number," a maxim open to serious criticism — but on the 
broadest grounds of public welfare which necessarily includes the in- 
terest of all. Our conduct is controlled by the exigencies of the 
social state in which we live, and our indebtedness t(^ society meas- 
ured bv the extent and character of our advancement. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 11 

The fact that men will persist in putting^ their judgment and indi- 
vidual interests against the i:)rogressive tendencies in social and indus- 
trial affairs indicates that the millenium is not yet in sight, and that 
war in some form will continue. 

It is fair, however, to presume that if industrial contests can not 
be avoided, that the conscience of enlightened communities will not 
tolerate their prosecution by the barborous methods heretofore 
practised. It is generally recognized that certain rules must obtain 
in military warfare, and the local public, embarassed by an industrial 
conflict, will assert its interest at least to the extent of insisting that 
neither party take undue advantage. It was public considerations 
of this kind that censured the action of the Virden Coal Company in 
attempting to stockade its mine, and later, aroused indignation when 
a merciless mob of hired murderers, protected from possible attack^ 
shot down law abiding citizens and unprotected workmen. 

The strike at Virden demonstrated that the American wage earner 
will fight for his job and his home as readily and as earnestly as he 
will for his flag. Governor Tanner's pathetic reference to the "home'^ 
and the ''village cemetery" touches this aspect of the contest. One 
who has devoted much time and thought to the study of social and 
economic questions, writing in commendation of the Governor's 
action in relation to the Virden strike, makes the following sugges- 
tive observation: 

"It .seems absurd that we should spend miUions of money and the best 
energies of onr being in training, educating and developing the children of 
our race, and after we have made men of them, to allow them to be sup- 
planted or forced to accept the standard of men who are hundreds of years 
behind them in what we call civilization, 

"It betokens an immense advance in public sentiment when the Chief Ex- 
ecutive of the State boldly proclaims that the power of the State shall no 
'onger be used to support measures that can ultimate in nothing but the 
deterioration of its citizenship." 

To foster and protect an exalted ci izenship is and should be the 
chief concern of the State and nation, and surely he who may seem 
to strain the function of his office in this respect can not be justly 
charged with having violated any law. Tlie action taken at Virden, 
so far as it invoked the exercise of the powers of the State, was but 
the culmination of the policy adopted by the Governor during the 
notable suspension of 1897, when he refused to make the State an 
agent in the operation of mines at a rate less than that demanded. 
This attitude was instrumental in securing the advance at which 



12 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

work ill the mines was resumed, not only in this but the other states 
comprising the competitive districts. Had the Governor complied 
with the wishes of certain employers by honoring the demands of 
timid sheriffs for troops, a different settlement would have been 
effected and one not so satisfactory to the miners. If the State had 
volnntperf^fl i^^'^ ac;«i''^*iiif*p' to miiips a^'*emptii<g to opprate at less 
than the rate demanded, it would only be a question of time when 
others would have followed, and a material break at any point in 
Illinois would force a similar settlement throughout the competitive 
districts. 

With the exception of a few metropolitan papers, owned and con- 
trolled by corporate interests, the Governor's course has been gen- 
erally endorsed. Referring to the intention of certain operators to 
import Chinese workmen during the suspension last.year, the Chicago 
Record said: 

"If the operators of the mines in the Braidwood district are seriously in- 
tending to hire Chinese labor as a means of coercing their employes into sub- 
mission, it is necessary to warn them that they will be doing worse by them- 
selves than by the miners. The American people will not stand this sort of 
thing. 

"It is all well enough to say that corporations have the right to go to the 
cheapest market for their labor, that the law of supply and demand works 
here as elsewhere. There is a line of reasonable dealing beyond which not 
even a private individual may go. And a corporation, employing hundreds 
of men and depending upon the people for the purchase of its products, oc- 
cupies a public relation which binds it still more firmly to keep within reason- 
able limits in making its struggle against labor. 

"If the mine operators proceed to import Chinese coolies who can live on 
almost nothing, who do not expect to have what American citizens regard as 
the decencies of life, to say nothing of its comforts, who are able to 'compete' 
with American labor by starving it out, they must be prepared to take the 
consequences. They will get no sympathy from the public and they will be 
held responsible for whatever disasters may follow." 

On the question of imported labor during the Virden and Pana 
contests the same paper gave expression to the following opinion: 

"The employing mine owners at Pana, 111., are bringing in negroes from the 
south to take the places of their striking workmen, with whom there is a dis- 
pute over the question of wages. The citizens of Pana in mass meeting Tues- 
day evening adopted resolutions protesting against this course on the part of 
the employers as tending to lower the standard of citizenship in their com- 
munity. 

"The protest of the citizens of Pana is well taken, not because the imported 
workmen are colored, but because they are low ^rade workmen, and the ef- 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 13 

feet of their coining must be to lower the standard of citizenship and of civil- 
ization in that place. If the demands of the strikers at Pana are excessive, 
the operators have a right to secure other workmen. But it is a social wrong 
for the operators to replace one set of workmen with others of a distinctly 
lower grade. The citizenship of a community should be kept up to as high a. 
standard as possible, and the efforts of those at the bottom to raise the stand- 
ard by bettering their conditions are deserving of encouragement. For a 
part of the employers ia a community deliberately to lower the standard by 
importing inferior Avorkmen to take the places of those of a higher grade, 
without doing everything possible to come to an agreement with those who 
have been in their employ, is an offense against the community. 

"In Pennsylvania the miners used to be high grade American workmen, 
who commanded fairly good wages. Every time there was a difficulty over 
wages or conditions of labor, foreigners were imported, and the American 
workiugmen were forced out altogether. As a result the standard of citizen- 
ship in some of the Pennsylvania mining communities has been radically 
lowered to the extent that those communities are not tit for self-government. 
The mob that was fired upon by a sheriff's posse at Lattimer some time 
ago was made up entirely of foreigners of this type, who had crowded out 
higher grade workmen, and then in turn found themselves ground down be- 
yond the point of endurance. 

"In self-governing communities the instinct of self-preservation must 
prompt a protest against this sort of thing. Labor troubles must be settled 
upon some other basis than that which results in radical lowering of the 
standard of citizenship by substituting an inferior for a higher grade of work- 
men." 

The Peoria Herald, an influential joiirna], politically opposed to 
the Governor, was fair enough to make the following bold declara- 
tion: 

"The Chicago papers that are opposed to Governor Tanner can see nothing 
in his recent refusal to send troops to Pana to protect the imported miners 
other than a bid for political favor. The Herald has opposed John R. Tanner 
as bitterly as any newspaper in the State. It does not pretend to analyze the 
motives that may have actuated him in refusing to send troops. It simply be- 
lieves that he did the right thing at the right time. We are willing to leave 
the motives to God and his own conscience. There has been nothing that h s 
caused more trouble in this State than the importation of labor to take the 
place of home labor if the miners make a demand for what is justly due them. 
Heretofore it has been the case that all the operators had to do was to j o 
down south, where labor is cheaper, where the expense of living is less, a d 
get a lot of black or white men to take their places. They have then sat back 
in their chairs and asked the State to run their mines for them to the extt- nt 
of seeing that no trouble came of this business. 

"And it has been to the shame of the State of Illinois that the State has 
usually consented to do this very thing. 



14 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

'*'It is time that some Governor with the necessary courage should rise up 
:and say that this thing must stop. It is time that the militia of the State 
should cease to be used as bond slaves to help perpetuate a series of outrages 
aimed by combined capital at home workingmen. No one pretends that the 
claims of the miners are not just. Competition in coal has become so keen 
that prices have been cut away below what they should be, aud when this is 
done the miner is called on by the operator to shoulder the loss that comes 
inevitably from this fierce competition. This is not the fault of the miner and 
he should not be called on to suffer the loss. He is getting merely what he 
can live on. Anything below that places him below the horse or any part of 
the animal kingdom that is well kept. 

"In the importations of miners that have taken place heretofore, few of the 
importations have remained. They have discovered that they can not live 
here in the north, with its five months of winter, for what they could in the 
sunny south, where the expenses of everything", from food down to clothing, 
are so much less, and they have returned. But they have stayed long enough 
to break the spirits of the miners who were contending for their rights, and 
who have been unable to bear the sight of starving wives and children. It 
has been but a few years since we had an illustration of this at Spring Valley. 
"The Herald hopes that Governor Tanner will" continue firm in refusing to 
u e the State militia for the purpose of helping the coal operators carry out 
the scheme they have in view. We hope that he will continue to refuse to 
allow State . troops to be used against Illinois workingmen so long as the 
property of innocent parties is not threatened. If that course results in in- 
creasing the popularity of John R. Tanner, which seems to be the dread of 
s ime of the Chicago newspapers, so much the better. It should increase his 
popularity. People can not help thinking well of a governor who breaks 
away from the old plan of furnishing aid to the plutoci'ats and nothing but 
shot and bayonets to the workingmen. There is nothing more popular — 
nothing that more increases the esteem in which a state ofiicial is held— than 
his daring to do right. And that is what Governor Tanner is doing in this 
instance." 

Resolutions commendatory of the action taken have been passed 
by nearly all the labor bodies in the United States, the latest ex- 
pression being that of the American Federation of Labor at its 
recent session at Kansas City, where delegates representing every 
•organized craft united in an unqualified endorsement of the Govern- 
or's conduct. 

The most significant expression appeared in the editorial columns 
•bf the Coal Trade Journal oi New York. Representing principally 
the interests of the employers, its editor, a fearless, independent man, 
had the courage to write as follows: 

"Governor Tanner of Illinois is being severely criticised by what is com- 
monly termed the metropolitan press, but which should be more justlj' termed 
the 'moneyed-aristocracy press' of the country. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 15 

"The eoudeumcition heaped upon the Governor, boiled down and crystal- 
lized, is hatred for his position as a fair man, and opposition to his metliod of 
doiu^ justice to all men. It is such a new thin^. 

"Such a departure from the ordiuarj' way of doing- business by the chief 
executive of any state that the employers, who heretofore have, almost with- 
out exception, been able to use the militia to assist in defeating- the projects 
and objects of the laboring people, are surprised. Workingmen have re- 
peatedly charged that the militia were used to coerce them into obedience to 
the wishes of employers, and that they were used for that purpose is at 
present very evident from the abuse heaped upon Governor Tanner. 

"If it wei-e not so the action of the Governor in sending: soldiers to preserve 
the peace, as he has done at Pana and Virden, would meet with approval. 
The attitude of the Governor towards the strikers and his instructions to the 
military that they were to disarm all people found w^ith firearms in their pos- 
session, and that they were not to give countenance or encouragement to the 
actions of employers in their attempt to coerce their workmen nor to lend as- 
sistance to the employers in their efforts to substitute scab for union labor, 
has completely astonished the capitalistic interests and they fall back on the 
time worn erj- of 'anarchist.'' 

••Any ofificial who dares to do right and who dares to execute the laws im- 
partially to all men, rich or poor, to employe as well as employer, is such a 
contrast from the usual run of officials, that he is regarded as a dangerous 
man and the eyes of all men are turned toward him. 

"One thing, however, is very much in evidence in the career of Governor 
Tanner — that neither the gratitude of the one class nor the hatred, envy and 
jealousy of the other, can influence him to depart one iota from the strict line 
uf duty impartially performed by him since the trouble began. 

" The Governor has repeatedly asserted, and has reiterated his assertion, 
that he is opposed to the importation of labor into Illinois, giving as some of 
his reasons that there is labor enough, and moi'e eommgof their own volition, 
to perform all the work that is to be done in the State. In this position the 
Governor will be supported by all the right-thinking people in and out of the 
State. 

"The cry is raised for the purpose of creating a race prejudice against the 
Governor, that he is an enemy to the colored man, yet no negro coming into 
the State of his own volition has been prohibited, and we feel safe in saying 
that if white labor, contracted for and imported in under the same conditions 
that the colored labor brought in was, that the Governor would oppose it just 
as much and as earnestly as he now does the colored, not because of color, 
but because the system is wrong, and he is opposed to Illinois being made the 
dumping ground for any kind of undesirable labor, be it white, black or 
yellow."' 

These opinions, it is fair to presume, merit the approbation of all 
men honestly and legitimately engaged in the coal industry, and 



16 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

they are in strong and refreshing contrast to the obsequious senti- 
ments expressed in certain coal journals, to which propriety in this 
connection forbids even a reference. 

Public feeling is so strong in favor of this new departure in wage 
contests that the precedent established by the present Executive of 
this State will, with or without special legislation, become the recog- 
nized policy. Congressional enactment now makes it unlawful to 
import, under contract, labor from foreign countries; the same prin- 
ciple applied between the states will confine the wage controversies 
of the future to native or resident labor, and encourages the hope 
that the day is not far distant when the military power of state gov- 
ernments will no longer be used for the unholy purpose of oppress- 
ing honest toil. Should this consummation be realized, then, in the 
interest of generations to come, the lives sacrificed in the battle at 
Virden may in some measure be atoned. 

The lockout at Virden commenced on the 1st day of April, 1898, 
and continued until the 15th day of November. During all those 
months the officials of the company declared their inability to 
operate and comply with the scale. The settlement ultimately 
effected utterly destroyed all these contentions. 

The agreement signed on the 15th day of November by the officials 
of the company and the miners' organization stipulated that the 
union would be recognized; that all the former workmen would be re- 
employed without discrimination; that the scale price of 40 cents 
per ton would be paid, and that the services of the superintendent, 
engineers and mine managers who had taken an obnoxious part in 
the contest, be dispensed with, and others satisfactory to the miners 
substituted. 

It is not on record where a corporation made such a complete and 
seemingly humiliating surrender to the claims of its emj)loy6s. The 
presumption is that the company could more readily afford to com- 
j)ly with the demands of the miners at the commencement than after 
the losses sustained in consequence of a seven months' suspension. 
The situation at Pana, so far as it affects the union, remains prac- 
tically the same, except the increased power of the organization to 
continue the contest. The conduct of the mine owners there, like that 
at Virden, is without excuse or justification. Their stubborn policy 
has seriously impaired the interests of the city and almost destroyed 
its reputation. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 17 

Viewed from a strictly business standpoint, it would have cost less 
for the people of the State to have appropriated from the public 
funds a sum equal to the aggregate earnings of the Pana miners for 
the past year. Unless speedily adjusted, the Pana difficulty will cost 
the people of Christian county and the State, for the hire of special 
deputy sherifPs and militia companies, an amount equal to, if it does 
not exceed, what the miners would have earned. 

Thinking people must conclude that this is altogether too high a 
price to pay for the privilege of witnessing a few coal companies 
outraging the good sense of a community and defying the laws of 
the State. 



18 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



STATISTICS OF THE STATE FOR THE YEAR. 



This is the fifteenth annual report of the State Bureau of Labor 
Statistics relating to coal mining in Illinois. It contains the cus- 
tomary statistics of this industry for the year ended July 1, 1898, as 
obtained from the owners of mines by the State inspectors, and by 
them reported to this office. 

The reports of inspectors are made upon uniform blanks prepared 
for them in this office, and embrace the statistical record of the oj)er- 
ating conditions and the output of every mining plant or opening 
within each inspection district for the year under consideration; 
they are accompanied by appropriate text and constitute the major 
portion of the following pages. 

For the purpose of arriving at the facts for the State at large which 
are gathered for the several districts, the reports of inspectors are 
summarized and subjected to such analysis in this office as may be 
necessary in order to determine the status of the industry as a whole. 
The result is a presentation which covers many details concerning 
not only each individual mine, but the mines grouped by counties, 
by inspection districts and for the State at large. 

While this report is prepared on lines parallel with former reports, 
thus preserving an unbroken chain of consecutive statistics, some 
new features of minor import are presented this year as the result of 
special inquiries. These inquiries have related (1) to the relative 
tonnage delivered to the general trade, to the local trade and to the 
plant for its own consumption; (2) to the distribution of the coal 
which is shipped to the several railroads engaged in handling it, and 
CS) to the possible output of the mines of the State as contrasted 
with their actual output. The facts in each of these respects have 
been successfully obtained and are fully set forth in subsequent 
pages. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 19 

Another observable feature of the report this year is the impress 
•made upon the statistics of the industry by the prolonged and general 
•strike which prevailed during the first part of the year, from July to 
December, and, in some parts of the field, from the following April 
to July. This experience was remarkable in its character and results 
and has atfected not only the tonnage of the year, but in some degree 
the price of coal and the prices paid for mining. 

The following- are some of the salient totals for the State for the 
year: 

Summary— 1898. 

Number of counties producing coal ^ 52 

Number of mines and openiugs of all kinds 881 

New mines or old mines reopened during the year 120 

Mines closed or abandoned since last report 92 

Total output of all mines in tons of 2,000 pounds 18,-599,299 

Estimated possible output with present equipment 41,082,925 

Number of shipping mines 329 

Total output of shipping mines, tons 17,655,561 

Number of mines in local trade only 552 

Output of local mines, tons 943,738 

Total tons of lump coal 14,208,795 

Total tons of other grades 4,390,504 

Total tons shipped 15,596,888 

Tons sold to local trade 2,149,808 

Tons consumed (or wasted) at the plant 852,603 

Average days of active operation for shipping mines 174.7 

Average value per ton of all lump coal at the mines $0 91.8 

Aggregate home value of total product $14,567,598 

Number of mines in which mining machines are used 55 

Number of mining machines in use 392 

Number of tons undercut by machines 3,415,635 

Average number of miners employed during the year 26,520 

Average number of other employes 8,506 

Total employes 35,026 

Number of men at work under ground 31,602 

Number at work on the surface 3,424 

Average price paid per gross ton for all hand mining $0 44.09 

Average price paid per gross ton for machine mining $0 31.. 37 

Number of kegs of blasting powder used 379,986 

Number of men accidentally killed 75 

Number of wives made widows 45 

Number of children left fatherless 112 

Number of men injured so as to lose a week or more of time 438 

Number of gross tons mined for each life lost 247,991 

INumber of employes to each life lost 465. 7 



20 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

A comparison of these figures with those of the preceding year 
shows an increase of 28 in the whole number of mines and openings 
of every kind in the State. This is not an unusual fluctuation in the 
reported number of mines, from year to year, as the gains and losses 
usually occur among the mines of smallest consequence. In this 
case, however, 19 of the 28 new mines are of the class known as ship- 
ping mines, and as such will become an appreciable factor in future 
production. 

The whole number of tons of coal raised to the surface during the 
year is, in round numbers, a million and a half tons less than the 
number reported for 1897. This is not surprising in view of the 
duration and magnitude of the strike. It is probably a smaller 
shrinkage than would have been expected. It is explained by the 
fact that while many mines were idle, a few were running night and 
day, and by the further fact that after the strike was settled, all 
mines resumed operations with unusual activity. 

The actual annual capacity or possible output of the mines of the 
State, operating under existing conditions, is here recorded as 41,- 
082,925 tons, or 121 percent more than the actual output for this 
year. Assuming that a normal output for this year would have been 
something over twenty million tons, it appears that the capacity of 
the mines of the State is equal to fully twice the demand for this 
product. 

The average running time for the shipping mines for the year is 
found to have been 174.7 days each, while that of the preceding year 
was 185.5 days. This difference is also le.ss than might have been 
expected. It is not inconsistent, however, with the decline in ton- 
nage, which was only 7.5 per cent, while that for days of active 
operation was 6.4 per cent; both confirm the excessive activity subse- 
quent to the strike. 

A comparison of average values for the last two years shows, for 
the first time in many years, a slight reaction from the tendency to 
lower prices which has so long prevailed. The average value of all 
coal at the mine, as computed for the State for 1897, was 85.2 cents 
per ton, the lowest value ever reported in this State. This year a 
corresponding average is found to be 91.8 cents per ton; and since 
the close of the year fer which this report is made, the demand for 
coal has been firm at advancing prices. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 21 

In the matter of prices paid for mining, or the wages of miners, 
the strike accomplished a material increase throughout the State, 
which is approximately expressed by the figures- 34.26 cents per ton 
for 1897, and 44.09 cents per ton for 1898. These are the averages 
computed for all gross- weight mining for the two years. The differ- 
ence is probably rather a generous measure for the average gain ob- 
tained by the miners, but it is impossible to make exactly parallel 
averages, owing to the establishment, now for the first time, of a uni- 
form gross-weight basis. 

An observable feature of the situation, as shoAvn by the foregoing 
figures, is the recent increase in machine mining. During the year 
the number of mines in which machines have been used has been in- 
creased by twelve and the number of machines in operation by 
seventy-two. This new interest in the mechanical process is ac- 
counted for in part by the impression that the mining rates as fixed 
by the State conferences are specially favorable to machine mining, 
and partly by the degree of efficiency which is being developed by 
some of the newly devised electrical machines. The effect of this 
new use of machines does not as yet appear in the machine tonnage, 
for the reason that many of them are so recently installed, and the 
further fact that the strike was of longest duration in machine mines. 

The reported number of miners and other employes is somewhat 
greater this year than last, the wdiole number being 35,02(). Of 
these, 31,602 are employed underground, and the remainder, or 10 
per cent of the whole, on the surface. 

The whole number of fatal accidents during the year was 75, which 
is six more than the fatal casualties of the preceding year. 

More specific treatment of the leading features of the statistics of 
the State is found under appropriate heads in the following pages. 

Classification of Mines. 
For the purpose of defining the relative importance of the coal mines 
of the State it is customary to separate them into two general 
groups — those operated for shipping purposes and those operated for 
merely local use. Such an analysis of the mines reported this year 
affords the following table, showing not only the number of mines in 
each class, but the number of men employed in and ihe number of 
ions produced by each class : 



22 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table I. — Shipping and Local Mines, hy Districts. 



District. 


Total. 


Shipping. 


Local. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


MerJ Tons. 


First. 


86 
184 
217 
94 
79 
98 
123 


7,377 

6,799 
1.800 
4,030 
6,093 
4,662 
4,265 


2,209,362 
2,551,110 

721.846 
2,572,059 
3,925,690 
3,459.932 
3,159.300 


39 
48 
21 
39 
51 
72 
59 


7,011 
5,966 
1,141 
3,608 
5,976 
4.518 
4,077 


2,018.150 
2,260,610 
567,296 
2.409,702 
3,891,294 
3,407,491 
3,101,018 


47 

196 

55 
28 
2C 
64 


366 
833 
659 
422 
117 
144 
188 


191,212 

290.500 
154 550 


Second 


Third 


Fourth 

Fifth 


162,357 
34,3%- 
52.44t 

58.282 


Sixth 


Seventh 




The State 


881 


35, 026 


18.599,299 


329 


32,297 


17,655,561 


552 


2.729 


943.738 



The whole number of mines here given is 881, or 28 more than was 
reported for last year. . Of the new mines, 19 are found among 
shipping mines and 9 in the local class. The number of shipping 
mines is thus increased to 329 and the local mines to 552. The rela- 
tive unimportance of this greater number is made apparent upon an 
examination of the small number of men employed in ail of them, 
and the consequent insignificance of their entire output. The fol- 
lowing table of percentages renders the contrasts between these two 
groups somewhat more conspicuous: 



Table II. 


— Percentages 


of Shpping and Local 


Mines, 


hii Dis 


tricts. 




District. 




Shipping. 




Local. 






Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


Mines . 


Men. 


Tons. 


First 


45.35 1 95.04 


91.35 
88.61 
78.59 
93.69 
99.12 
08.48 
98.11 


54.65 
73.91 
90.32 
58.51 
34.57 
2(1.53 
52.03 


4.96 
12.25 
36.60 
10.47 
1.92 
3.09 
4.40 


8 65 






Third 








Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 


41.49 
65 .43 
73.47 


89.53 
98.08 
%.91 
95.60 


6.31. 

0.88 
1.52 












The State 


37.49 


92.30 


94.93 


62.51 


7.70 













From this it will readily be observed that the mines which really 
constitute this an industry are the 329 shipping mines, which give 
employment to 92 per cent of all the men, and deliver 95 per cent of 
all the coal. The local mines, however, have their own importance 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



23 



as a convenient source of cheap fuel for many people, and as con- 
tributors of nearh' a million tons to the total fuel supply of the 
State. 

A more specific classification of the mines of the State is that 
based upon their output, which is presented in the following table: 



Table III.^ — Class ijication of Jlines by Ouiput and hij Distrirfs 





Mi>Es Producing— 


District. 


Under 
1,000 
tons. 


1,000 and 

under 

10,000 tons. 


10.000 and j 50.000 and 1 100.000 

under under tons and 
50,000 tons. 100,000 tons. over. 


Total. 




No. 


Tons. 


- 


Tons. No.| Tons. 

1 1 


No.l Tons. No. 


Tons. 'no. 
1 


Tons. 


First 


28j 21.410 

691 35,516 
155 55.328 
20! 11,095 
17 i 9,960 
7! 3,350 
55 1 24.963 


28 
76 

:: 

12 


71,508 
218,602 
113.974 
127,794 
28.436 
74,556 


11 282,137 13 


934.599 
727. 198 
116,414 
842,477 
1.716.560 
1.151.507 
862,758 


6 

7 
1 
7 

13 
6 
9 


899.708 
1.054,716 

142,302 
1,175.453 
1.839,289 
1.033,%2 
1,462,623 


86 
184 
217 
94 
79 
98 
123 


2 209,362 


Second 

Third- 


22 515,078 
13 29.^ S9S 


10 
2 
11 
23 
16 
11 


2.551.110 

721.846 

2,572.059 

3,925.690 


Fourth 

Fifth . 


15 
14 
45 
31 


415,240 

331,445 

1,196.557 

751,677 


Sixth 


3,459,932 


Seventh 


17 


57,279 


3,159,300 


The State. 


351: 161,622 


244! 692,149, 151 


3,785,962 


86i 6,351,513'i 49 

1 1 


7,608,053 


881 


18,599,299 



The five groups into which the mines of the State are here sep- 
arated, sufficiently indicate their relative value as i^roducers of coal. 
Coml)inations of these groups show that 135 mines produce 50.000 
tons or over, each, and a total (jf 13,959,5G'5 tons, that is, an average 
of over 100.000 tons each; while 595 mines j^roduce a total of only 
(S53.771 tons, or an average of 1.-426 tons each, in the year. 

The relation of each of these groups to the whole number of mines 
and the whole number of tons produced in the State, is shown in the 
following table of percentages: 



24 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table IV. 



-Percentages of the Total Numher and Total Output of 
Specified Classes of Mines. 



Mines Producing— 


No. 


Output. 


Percentage of— 


No. 


Output. 


Less than 1 000 tons 


351 
244 
151 

86 
49 


161,622 

692.149 

3.785,962 

6,351,513 

7,608.053 


39.84 
27.70 
17.14 

9.76 
5.56 


87 


One thousand and less than 10 000 tons 


3 72 


Ten thousand and less than 50,000 tons 


20 36 


Fifty thousand and less than 100 000 tons 


34 15 




40.90 






Total.. 


881 


18,599,299 


100 00 


100 00 







The relative size of these respective groups does not materially 
fluctuate from year to year, though they necessarily change in some 
degree. Following is a record of the number of mines which have 
been found in each of these classes for a series of years: 

Table V. — Numher of Mines in Specified Groups for a Series of 
Sixteen Years. 







Number of Mines Producing— 






Year. 


Under 
1.000 
tons. 


1,000 and 

under 

10,000 tons. 


10.000 and 

under 
50,000 tons 


50,000 and 

under 
100,000 tons 


100.000 

tons 

and over. 


Total 
mines. 


1883 


209 
262 
286 
316 
320 
327 
321 
398 
402 
332 
282 
312 
319 
330 
346 
351 


233 
273 
290 
280 
278 
272 
316 
301 
260 
239 
232 
252 
276 
280 
250 
244 


133 
148 
143 
135 
141 
151 
139 
155 
161 
151 
140 
161 
145 
128 
120 
151 


39 
38 
40 
44 
42 
47 
55 
54 
52 

. 

75 

« 

61 
63 
79 

86 


25 
20 
19 
14 
20 
25 
23 
28 
43 
52 
59 
50 
54 
61 
58 
49 


639 


1884 


741 


1885 


778 


1886 


789 


1887 


801 


1888 


822 


1889 


854 


1890 


936 


1891 


918 


1892 


839 


1893 


788 


1894 


836 


1895 


855 


1896 


862 


1897 


853 


1S98 


881 






Averages 

Percentagres 


319.6 
38.76 


267.2 
32.41 


144 
17.45 


56.3 

... 


37.5 
4.55 


824.5 
100 00 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



25 



It is observed here that, as compared with the averai^es for all years, 
the number in each oroiip for 1S9S is greater with the one excepticni 
<^f the second group, that is to say. the better chiss of local mines, 
which are less numerous this year than formerly. There are 49 mines 
of the first class, that is, those producing over one hundred thousand 
tons in the year, and this is the smallest number of mines of thiscla.ss 
which has l)een reported in seven years. On the other hand there 
are more nnnes of the second class, producing from 50.000 to 100,000 
tons, than has ever been reported. This draws attention to the fact 
that this is not a classification of mines, nor of their capacity, but of 
their output for respective years. The excess of mines found this 
year in the second class mentioned is doubtless made up of mines 
which normally belong in the first class, l)ut have been hindered dur- 
ing the present year by the strike. 

Among the mines which have produced over 100.000 tons there are 
seven which have produced over 200,000 tons, and one which has 
produced over 300,000 tons. Following is a list of these: 

3Iinesfrom tvhich more than 200,000 Tons have been delivered 
during the year 1898. 



Companies. 



Location. 



St. Louis and Big: Muddy Coal Co iCarterville.. .. 

Kelly ville Coal Co. No. 2 j VV^estville 

Big Muddy Coal and Iron Co. No. 5 JMurphysboro 



Kelly ville Coal Co. No. 3 i Westville 

Muddy Valley Mining: and Manufacturing' Co iHallidayboro. 

Breese Coal Co ' Breese 



Devlin Coal Co. 
Total 



L'oluca. 



319,697 
248.872 
242,678 
235. 220 
232. 238 
222, 765 
207,987 



,457 



This is the smallest list of mines in this class which has appeared 
for several years. Last year the number was 17 and the year before 
16. The influence of the strike is observed in this and in the further 
fact that the mines here enumerated are those which either had no 
strike, or strikes of least duration. Only one mine in the State reached 
an output of 300,tX)0 tons; last year there were five of these, and the 
year before, eight. All these mines except that of the Kellyville Coal 
Company show gains in outjmt over any previous record, that is to 



26 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



my, they were gHiners rather than losers by the strike. The list of 
mines from which more than one and less than two hundred thousaitd 
tons was raised is as follows: 

Mines from which more than 100,000 Tons and less than 200,000- 
Tons have been delivered during the year 1898. 



Companies, 



Location. 



Tons. 



Spring Valley Coal Co. Xo. 1 jSprine Valley. . 

Centralia Mining and M:tniif acturiug Co jCentralia 

Taylorville Coal Co \ Taylorville 

Chicago-Virden Coal Co. No. 1 Virden 

Pittenger & Davis Mining and Manufacturing Co.jCentralia 

Pawnee Coal Co i Westville 

7 Consolidated Coal Co. No. 6 'Staunton 

8 Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 3 jSpring Valley. . 

9 Chicago, Wilmington and Vermilion Coal Co. No. liStreator 

10 Coffeen Coal Co ICofteen 

11 Odin Coal Co Odin 

i 

12 Westville Coal Co .Westville 

13 Chicago, Wilmington and Vermilion Coal Co. No. 2|Streator 

14 Ri verton Coal Co ' Ri verton 

15 Braceville Coal Co I Braceville 

16 Citizens' Coal Mining Co., Mine "A" 'Springfield 

17 Sandoval Coal Co Sandoval 

18 Consolidated Coal Co. No. 8 iMt. Olive 

19 Whitebreast Fuel Co., Mine "C". ; Dunfermline .. 

20 Madison Coal Co. No. 5 jMt. Olive 

21 Star Coal Co. No. 2 iCarbon Hill. . . . 

22 Wilmington Coal Mining and Manufacturing Co.. | Diamond 

23 Marquette Coal Co | Marquette 

24 Big-Four Wilmington Coal Co |Coal City 

25 Madison Coal Co. No. 2 jt.Tleu Carbon . . . 

2ti McLean County Coal Co JBloomington... 

27 Illinois Central Coal and Salt Co jSt Johns 

28 Spring Valley Coal Co. No. 2 Spring Valley. 

29 Consolidated Coal Co. No. 10 JMt. Olive 

30 Big Muddy Coal and Iron Co ^Murphysboro.. 

Carterville Coal Co Carterville . . . . 

Chicago, Wilmington and ^■ermiliou Coal Co Seatonville — 

33 Starnes Coal Mining Co Springfield 



197, 042' 
182,352- 
180. 000' 
177,623 
176, 75S 
173,5H.f 
171,200 
171,029 
170,839 
170,000' 
169. 554 
165,889 
163, 409 
162,862 
162, 000 
162,415 
152, 249' 
143, 772 
142,302. 
139,817 
136.512. 
135, 736 
134. 941 
131,212 
130, 284 
130.000 
128.068 
127,6.33 
118,579 
116.104 
113,378 
113.035 
112,777 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

List — Concluded. 



21 



Companies. 



Decatur Coal Co. No. 2 j Decatur 

Butler Ballast Co. (stripping) jOakwood .... 

Ohio & Mississippi Valley Coal & Mining Co. No. lIMarion 

Chicago- Virden Coal Co, No, 2 1 Auburn 

O'Gara-King Coal Co IGreen Ridge 



Coal Valley Mining Co. No. 

DuQuoin Union Coal Co 

Pana Coal Co 

Scott-Wilson Coal Co 

Total 



Sherrard... 
DuQuoin... 

Pana 

Carterville. 



111,602 


110,320 


108,400 


105, 106 


163, 400 


103,049 


102,000 


101,738 


100,000 



5,898,596 



Fifteen of the mines in this list were last year in the list of great- 
est producers. One of them, the Braceville Coal Company,, was at 
the head of the list, with an output of 343.518 tons from a 3J-foot 
seam. The number of mines in this class is about the same as usual, 
the average for seven years being 43 mines. Likewise the output of 
the whole shows an average of substantially 140,000 tons for each, 
for a number of years. In these two groups there are 4il mines 
with an aggregate product of 7.608,053 tons, that is to say, they 
represent 5.5 per cent of all mines and 41 per cent of all tons. 

The gains and losses in the number of mines in the several inspec- 
tion districts, during the year, appear in the table following: 

Table VI — Qain and Loss in Number of Mines, by Districfs. 



No, of 
mines, 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State. 

Net gain. . 



No. of 
new- 
mines. 



No. of 
aban- 
doned 
mines. 



No. of 
mines. 



SG 
184 
217 

94 

98 1. 
123 j. 



1 ' 


1 


^tr'- 


! 









28 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The net gain of 28 mines here shown is really the difference be- 
tween 120 mines reported now for the first time and 92 reported 
abandoned. The greatest gain is found in the Third district, where 
the coal is chiefly mined for local uses, and this increase represents a 
number of obscure mines recently discovered by the inspector, as 
well as those which have been newly opened. 

The Output for the Year. 
The volume of the business of the year as represented by the ag- 
gregate output of all mines is given in tons by districts in the table 
below: 

Table Yll—Outimt of the State, hij Districts. 





Total 
output. 
Tons. 


Tons of 
lump. 


Tons of 

other 
grades. 


Percentage of— 


District. 


Lump. 


Other 
grades. 


First 


2.209.362 
2,551,110 
721,846 
2,572,059 
3 925 690 


1,716,685 

2, 080, 702 

590.299 

2, 178. 132 

9 71S 171; 


492.677 
470.408 
131.547 
393,927 
1,207.515 

7,IR n99 


77.70 
81.57 
81.78 
82.73 
69.24 
78.42 
69.96 








Third 




Fourth 


17 ''7 


Fifth 


30 76 


Sixth 


3 459 932 [ 2 713 399 


91 58 


Seventh 


3.159.300 2.211.404| 947.897 


30 04 






The State 


18 599 299 11 "^os 79.1 ! i aan fini 


76.39 


93 gi 













This shows a .total of 18,599,299 tons of coal delivered from the 
mines of Illinois during the year ended July 1, 1898, of which 14,- 
20(5.795 tons, or 76.39 per cent, was lump coal and the remainder was 
coal of all other grades. A glance at the district totals shows their 
relative importance as producers of coal. The Fifth district, em- 
bracing the field in the central part of the State, is most prolific, 
with an output of 3,925,690 tons, though the Sixth and Seventh, lying 
south of it, each have totals of over three millions. Of the four 
northern districts, three produce from two to two and a half millions, 
while the Third shows a much smaller tonnage than any. The per- 
centages of lump coal and of other grades, as shown here for the sev- 
eral districts, are suggestiye rather than significant of the character 
of the coal and the size of the screens. Since the establishment of the 
gross-weight system of weighing coal, the manufacture of miscellaneous 
-special grades has become possible, and the term "other grades" now 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



29* 



signifies something more than mere screenings or refuse. Formerly 
the screenings in the First and Second districts were only 7 or 8 per 
cent of the total output, while in other parts of the State they were 
30 or 40 per cent. Now there is approximate uniformity throughout 
the State, without distinctive geographical differences. 

A comparison of the output of districts and of the State for this 
and the preceding year, is instituted in the following table: 

Table VIII.— Output of 1897 and 1898 Compared, by District!^. 



District. 


Output, 1897. 
(Tons.) 


Output. 1898. 
(Tons.) 


Gain. 


Loss. 


First 


2,937,980 
2,738,408 
575, 199 
2,916.162 
5,009,102 
3,558,405 
2,337.502 


2,209,362 
2,551,110 
721,846 
2,572,059 
3.925,690 
3.459.932 
3,159,300 




728 618 






187,298 


Third. 


146,647 




Fourth 


344 103 


Fifth 


1,083 412 


Sixth 




98, 473 




821.798 








The State 


20,072,758 


18,599,299 


968,445| 2,441,904 






Net loss 


1,473.459 tons. 









It is observed here that the net loss in tonnage for the year is 
1,473,459 tons. This, however, is not distributed j)ro rata among the 
districts; on the other hand, both the Third and the Seventh exhibit 
material gain over any former output. There is a gain of nearly a 
million tons in the output of these two districts, and an aggregate 
loss of nearly two and a half millions in the remaining districts, leav- 
ing the net loss as above stated. The Seventh district is in the ex- 
treme southern end of the State, and through a combination of cir- 
cumstances, some of the largest plants in this field were able to con- 
tinue in operation throughout the general strike. The largest mine 
in the Third district, and some others, were also fortunate enough to 
settle with their men without serious delay, and thus secured a good 
run of business while competing mines were idle. The greatest loss 
fell upon the Fifth district, which was the storm center of the gen- 
eral strike as well as the scene of much later trouble. The Sixth 
district suffered less than any of the others, but the First, that is, 
the so-called Braidwood field, failed of its normal output by three- 



?>0 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



quarters of a million tons. Much of the story of the year's turbu- 
lence may be read in the lines of this table, and all of its influence 
on output. 

The gradual development of this industry for a series of seventeen 
years appears in the following statement of the total tons produced 
in each of the years since statistics of the subject were first gathered 
bv this Bureau: 



Table IX. —Output of the State for Seventeen Years. 



Total 
output. 

(Tons.) 



Tons 
of lump. 



Tons 
of other 
grades. 



Percentage of- 



r i„iiT^ Other 
L"™P- grades. 



■1882. 
1SS3. 
1884. 
1885. 
1886. 
1887. 
1888. 
1889. 
1890. 
1891. 
18'92. 
1893. 
1894. 
.1S95. 
1,896. 
1897. 
1898. 



|. 11.017,069 

I 12,123,456 

! 12,208.075 

1 11,834,459 

I 11,175,241 

j 12,423,066 

! 14.3^,181 



9,115,653 
10,030,991 
10,101,005 
9,791.874 
9,246,435 
10,278, 
11.855,188 



I 14,017,298 11,597,963 
I 15,274.727] 12,638,364 



15,660,6981 

1 

17,062.276 

19,949,564 

17,113,576 

17,735.864 

19,786,626 

20,072,758 

18,599,2991 



12,960.224 
14,730.963 
16,112.899 
13.865,284 
14.045,962 
14,210,024 
14,672,241 
14.208,795 



1,901,506 
2, 092. 
2.107,070 
2,402.585 
1,928,806 
2, 144, 176 
2,472,993 
2,419,335 

2,700,474 
3,131.313 
3,836,655 
3,248,292 
3.689,902 
5,576,602 
5,400.517 
4,390,504 



82.74 
82.76 
82.47 
80.77 
81.02 
79.25 
71.86 
73.10| 
76.39! 



17.26 
17.24 
17.53 
19.23 
18.98 
20.75 
28.14 
26.90 
23.61 



Aside from its historic value as a consecutive record of the coal 
production of the State, the feature of this table which arrests at- 
tention is the showing made of the respective percentages of lump 
and other grades of coal of the total product. This separation of 
grades does not appear until 1890, for the reason that no inquiry 
was made upon this subject until that year, Since then the propor- 
tion of other grades has increased with substantial regularity until 
1896; but for this two subsequent years it has, without apparent 
cause, declined. During the past year, through mutual agreement 
between operators and miners, a uniform practice has been estab- 
.lished of paying for coal on the basis of the gross ton. This, it was 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



31 



believed, would result in careless minini;- and an increase in the 
amount of screenings. On the other hand, this plan permitted the 
operators to take the coal from the scale and screen and separate it 
in any manner they chose, without interference or protest from the 
miners. The result has been that all the softer coals are being han- 
dled with much greater care than formerly, with the two-fold object 
of meeting the demands of a more critical market, and of reducing 
the wastage arising from old methods of screening. Another fact 
which should be considered is that both mine-run voal and the size 
sometimes made and known as egg coal are reported as lump coal 
and not as other grades. The egg coal, although it passes through a 
set of bars, is really a high-grade coal of equal, if not greater value 
than lump, and the mine-run, or unscreened coal, is much more lump 
than screenings. These facts and the new methods of screening m'ay 
explain and may occasion in future a gradually increasing percent- 
age of lump, notwithstanding the introduction of the gross-weight 
basis, and possibly, in a measure, because of it. 

One further statement is offered showing not only the annual ton- 
nage, but the number of mines from which it is derived, and the 
number of men engaged in producing it, for each of a series of years: 

Table X. — Oufpuf of the State for 17 Years, and the Mi)ies and 
Men producing it. 



Year. 1 Mines. 


Men. 


Tons. 


1 Year. Mines. 

1 


Men. 


Tons. 


1S82 1 704 


20,290 
23.939 


11,017,069 
12,123,456 
12,208.075 
11,834,459 
11,175,241 
12,423.066 
14,328,181 


1891 


1 
918 32, 951 15. 660. 698 


1S83 ! 639 


il892 • 


839] 33,6321 17,062,276 


1S84 ' 74l' 25,575 


1893 


7881 35 390| 19 949 564 


1885 1 778 25,946 


1894 


836 .38. 1771 17. 113. .=176 


1S86 1 787 25,846 

1887 8011 26,804 


11895 

1896 


874 
901 
853 

881 


38,630 17.735,864 
37,057 19,786,626 


1888 : 822; 29.410 


! 

11897 


33 788 20 072 758 


1889 ' 854 


30,076 
28,574 


14,017,298 
15.274,727 


1898 


35 0'6 I" "^I'l ''•'' 


1890 \ 936 






260.382.233 










This is convenient as a reference table, and epitomizes the busi- 
ness of coal mining in Illinois for each year since 1881. 

Output by Counties. 
The entire output of the State, 18,599,290 tons, is drawn from 52 
counties, but much the greater i^art of this is obtained in compara- 
tively few of them. Grouping all counties which have produced 



32 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



over half a million tons, in the order of the magnitude of their out- 
put, and for the two years, 1897 and 189S, affords the following table: 



Table XI. 



-Relative Rank of the Principal Coal Producing 
Counties. 1898 and 1897. 



Rank. 



Counties— 1 



Sangamon.. 
St. Clair.... 
Vermilion .. 
Macoupin... 

LaSalle 

Williamson. 

Jackson 

Bureau 

Perry 

Grundy 

Marion 

Peoria 



Fulton.... 
Total. 



Tons. 


Rank. 


1.763.863 


. 


1,600,752 


2 


1,520,699 


3 


1,264.926 


4 


1.165,490 


5 


915, 108 


6 


911, 194 


7 


865.892 


8 


845,329 


9 


796,249 


10 


714,513 


11 


640, 193 


12 


630. 769 


13 


563,397 


14 


14,198,374 



Counties— 1897. 



Vermilion 



Macoupin... 
Sangamon.. 
St. Clair.... 
La Salle .... 

Bureau 

Grundy 

Christian. .. 
Madison. ... 

Perry 

Jackson 

Williamson. 

Marion 

Peoria 

Total.... 



Tons. 



2,000,623 


1,975,981 


1,838,45a 


1.718,194 


1.508.833 


1.145,312 


1,077,576 


837,897 


780,921 


689.921 


675,212 


669.480 


626.850 


504.309 



By this it appears that 14,198,374 tons, or 76.77 per cent of the 
total output was mined in 14 out of the 52 coal counties; also that 
in 1897, 16,049,562 tons, or 79.95 per cent of the output of that year 
was also mined in 14 counties, and in the same counties with one 
exception. Owing to the disturbing influences of the year, the 
changes in the order of precedence observed here have but little sig- 
nificance. During the past year the output of every county has 
hinged, not upou its capacity or natural resources, but upon its rela- 
tions to the strike. Every county in the list of 1898 shows a dimin- 
ished output except Williamson, Jackson, Perry and Marion in the 
south end, and Peoria and Fulton counties, all of which profited by 
the disturbances in other counties. Christian county, the seat of the 
Pana mines, has dropped from the list entirely, for obvious reasons, 
and Fulton county has come into the list for the first time. 

A final exhibit relating to the output for the year is given in the 
table below", containing an alphabetical list of all coal-bearing coun- 
ties, with the number of mines, men and tons reported for each. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



33 



Table XII — Oiilpid of the State — by Counties. 



County. 



Bond 

Brown 

Bureau 

Calhoun — 

Cass 

Christian ... 

Clinton 

Fulton 

Gallatin — 

Greene 

Grundy 

Hamilton ... 
Hancock — 

Henry 

Jackson — 
Jefferson ... 

Jersey 

Johnson 

Kankakee .. 

Knox 

LaSalle 

Livingston , 

Logan 

Macon 

Macoupin. . 
Madison . . . 



ines. 


Men. 


2 


172 


16 


28 


17 


2,915 


1 


17 


3 


31 


G 


991 


4 


467 


87 


1,139 


9 


52 


6 


23 


20 


3,127 


2 


8 


4 


30 


30 


461 


21 


1,225 


2 


57 


1 


4 


5 


16 


2 


190 


34 


196 


44 


3,647 


17 


301 


3 


258 


3 


344 


20 


2.077 


23 


1,026 



County. 



96,314 
1,940 

865,892 

4,893 

2.900 

495.616 

417,584 

563.397 

16,812 

8,520 

796,249 

4,882 

5,S00 

159,049 

911,194 

46,060 

1,680 

2,030 

84,632 

49.819 

1,165,490 

122,087 

177.935 

300.264 

1,264,926 



Marion 

Marshall 

McDonough., 

McLean 

Menard 

Mercer 

Montgomery 

j Morgan 

I Peoria 

' Perry 

Randolph 

j Rock Island 

I Saline 

j Sangamon .. 
I Schuyler . . . 

! Scott 

I Shelby 

i Stark 

St. Clair.... 

Tazewell ... 

Vermilion . . 

Warren 

i 

I Washington 

j Will 

j Williamson. 

I Woodford . . 



Mines. Men. i Tons. 



837 

315 

321 

468 

814 

450 

4 

1,092 

1,325 

421 

152 

144 

2,320 

3' 

55 

152 

90 

2,169 

1 
2,3j4 
55 
88 
112 
929 
438 



714.513 

286,365 

77,696 

171,594 

314, 160 

384 ,.345 

294,667 

1,800 

640,193 

845.329 

274,072 

47,490 

100,005 

1,763,863 

11,149 

21,337 

68,3as 

21,936. 

1,600,752 

84,507 

1,520,C99 

12,245 

43,808 

40,904 

915.108 

145.840 



DISPOSITION OF OUTPUT. 

Hitherto no attempt has been made in these reports to analyze^ 
the output of mines on the basis of the specific disposition made of 
it. It has been assumed in general that the tonnage of so-called 
shipping mines has been shipped, and that of local mines sold to- 
the home market. In fact, the shipping mines also have a home' 
trade, sometimes a large, and always a profitable one. Likewise all 
steam power plants consume some portion of their output in opera- 
tion, and in some parts of the fit'ld a CDUsidcrable portion of the 



34 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



gross tonnage hoisted to the surface and also paid for at the price of 
good coal, is wholly wasted in the form of refuse screenings for 
which there is neither use nor sale. Herewith is a table giving the 
foregoing details of disposition for all the coal of the several dis- 
tricts. 



Table XIII. — Dis2)osition of Output — Bij Districts. 



District. 


Total 
tons. 


TnriQ Tons sold 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 


Fir'st 


2,209,362; 1,759,512: 367,032 82.818 


Second . . . 


1 ! 

2,551.110, 2,113,432, 350,468 
721,846' 549.799; 158,216 

I ! 

2,572.059 1,989,8961 476,089 
3,925,690 3,366,3671 383,801 
3.459.932 3.021.521' 209,598 


87, 210 


Third. 


13.831 




106,074 


Fifth 


175,522 


Sixth 


228.813 




3,159.300: 2,796,361 204.6041 158.335 






The State 


18,599,2991 15.596.8=S8i 2. 149.808! 852.603 






i 





Coal mining in Illinois, as an industry, has contributed to the 
transportation companies during the year fifteen and a half million 
tons of freight. In a normal year it would have been more, as it will 
doubtless be in subsequent years. This is the first fact of interest 
developed by this table. Another is that whereas, eighteen and a 
half million tons of coal were delivered from the various mines, a 
little more than two millions of it sufficed for the communities in 
which the mines are located. The last column contains two elements 
which can not well be separated — the tons consumed and those wasted. 
The general fact is, however, that the districts which show the smaller 
amounts in this column are those in which there is the least or no 
wastage at all. The following table in which all the above totals are 
reduced to percentages affords a plainer reading of the facts: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



35 



Table XIV. — Percentages of Disposition — By Districts. 



District. 


Tons 
shipped. 




First 


79.77 
82.85 
76.17 
77.36 
85.75 
87.33 
88.51 


i 




13 76 3 39 


Third 


21 92 1 1 91 


Fourth . 


18 51 4 13 


Fifth 


9.77 1 4 48 


Sixth 


1 
6.06 1 6 61 


Seventh 


6 48 5 01 


The State. . . 




83.86 


11 56 4 58 







Simply stated, 84 per cent of all our coal is delivered on track for 
shipment, 11 per cent is sold at the mine, and 5 per cent is consumed 
and wasted in the industr}-. In the matter of local sales the per- 
centag-es range from 6 to 22 in the various districts. The largest per- 
centage is expected and found in the Third district, where 90 per cent 
of the openings are purely for local uses. In other districts and in 
general, this percentage must depend upon the density of the popu- 
lation within reach of the mines, and upon the magnitude of the out- 
put, both of which conditions vary greatly in different localities. 

More significance is found in the percentages of tons consumed and 
wasted. In the first two districts this percentage is small because in 
those regions the offal of the screens is not in excess of the demand 
for it and the consumption of it; consequently there is no waste to 
account for. In the Third district there is no waste and but little 
consumption. l)ecause there are but few steam-power plants; conse- 
quently the percentage is least. In the remaining districts the element 
of wastage appears in varying degrees, but presumal^ly in the ratio in 
which the percentages increase. 

The local distribution of output may be observed more clearly by 
.an examination of the following table, showing the disposition made 
of product by counties: 



36 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XV — Disposition of Output — by Counties. 

FIRST DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons sold to 
local trade.' 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 


Grundy . . 


796,249 

84,632 

1,165.490 

122,087 
40,904 


738,912 
78,108 

845.411 
67,470 
29,611 


30, 192 

4,982 

*278,880 

42,587 

10,301 


27, 145 


Kankakee 


1,542 


LaSalle 


41, 199 




12, eso 


Will 


992 








2,209,362 
100.00 


1,759,512 

79.77 


367,032 
16.65 


82, 818 




3.62 







86,000 tons consumed by the producers in the manufacture of zinc. 



SECOND DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons con- 
Tons sold to sumed (and 
local trade, wasted) at 

the plant. 


Bureau . . . 


865,892 
159,049 
286,365 
384,345 
640,193 
47,490 
21,936 
145.840 


800,162 
48,454 
263.793 
337,685 
535.0^ 
2,968 


31,613 
106,415 
16,925 
29, 151 

42, 172 
21,536 
12,668 


34, 117 


Henry 


4.180 


Marshall 


5.64T 




17,509 




15. 117 




2,350 


Stark 


400 


Woodford 


125,282 


7,890 






The district 


2,551.110 
100.00 


2,113,432 

82.85 


350. 468 


87. 210 


Percentages , 


13.76 3.39' 









COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XF- Continued. 

THIRD DISTRICT. 



37 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons Tons sold to 
shipped. local trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 


Brown 


1.940 
563.397 

5.600 
49.819 
77.696 
11. 149 
12.245 


1 1940 




Fulton 


492,599 58,817 

4,200 1,400 

! 49,819 


11 981 


Hancock 










52,460j 23,386 

540 10,609 

12, 245 


1.850 


Schuyler . . . 
















721,846 
100.00 


549,799} 158,216 
76.17 21.92 


13,831 




1.91 







FOURTH DISTRICT. 



County- 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons sold to 
local trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 


• 'ass 


2.900 
177.935 
300.264 
171.594 
314. 160 
84,507 
1.520.699 




2.900 
39.507 
88.463 
119.315 
32.972 
66 452 






128.666 
204.375 

33.650 
266.336 

16.725 
1,340.144 


9,762 
7,426 


Macon 




18,629 




14,852 


Tazewell 


1 "wn 


Vermilion 


126,480! .54 OT."; 










2,572.059 
100.00 


1,989.896 
77.36 


476,089 
18.51 


106 074 




4.13 







38 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XV — Continued. 

FIFTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons sold to 
local trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 


Calhoun 


4.893 

495,616 

8,520 

1,680 

1,800 

1,264,926 

294,667 

1,763,863 

68,388 

21,337 




39.193 
8.520 
1,680 
1,800 

42, 777 

40,800 
229,155 

11,901 
3,082 




Christian 


441,095 


15.328 








Morgan 






Macoupin 

Montgomery 


1,116,363 
246,857 

1,493.021 
51,376 
17,655 


105.786 
7.010 
41.687 


Shelby 

Scott 


5.111 
600 


The district 


3,925,690 
100.00 


3,366,367 

85.75 


383,801 
9.77 


175 522 


Percentages 


4.48 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Tons sold to 
local trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 




96,314 
417,584 


87.488 
380,043 
519. 722 


4,626 
11,253 
49,834 
21, 603 
122,282 


4,200 




26,288 




630. 769 


61.213 




714, 513 676. 840 


16, 070 


St. Clair 

The district 

Percentages 


1.600,752 


1,357,428 


121, 042 


3,459.932 
100.00 


3.021.521 
87.33 


209.598 
6.06 


228,813 
6.61 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

T<Me XF— Concluded. 



89 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 



County. 


Total tons. 


Tons 
shipped. 


1 Tons con- 
Tons sold to sumed (and 
local trade, wasted) at 
the plant. 


f4all«tin 


16,812 

4.882 


10,022 5.740 l.CiO 






1 
4,882 

sn OT.s 4.=; 117 


.lack'ion 


911,194 


ssfi nni 


Jefferson 


46,060 8.000' 36.060 2.000 




2,030 
845.329 
274,072 
100,005 
43,808 
915,108 


840^ 1,190 
i 
762, 534 40. 140 




Perrv 


42, 655 


Randolph 

Saline 


249.236 
G9. 102 
24,900 

835, 723 


17.117 
29,053 
16,832 
23,517 


7.719 
1,850 


Wa.shin^ton 


2,076 




55,868 








3,159,300 
100 00 


2, 796. .361 
88.51 


204,604! 158,335 


Percentage^ 


6 48! 5 01 









An analysis of the tonnage of shipping mines only is found in the 
tal)le followinuT 

Table XVI. — Disposition of the Output of Skipping Mines onlij — 
Bij Districts. 



Pekcenta(tE of 





Di 


STRICT. 


Total output 
of shipping- 
mines. 


Tons shipped 


Tons sold 
to local trade. 


Tons con- 
sumed (and 
wasted) at 
the plant. 


First 


2, 018, 150 
2,260,610 
567,296 
2,409,702 
3,891,294 
3.407,491 
3,101,018 


87.18 
93.49 
96.91 

82.58 
86.51 

90.17 


i..=0 
3.02 
0.83 
13.42 

i 8.98 
4.61 
4.75 


3 6'' 


Second 


3 49 


Third 


2.26 


Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh... 


ite 
•en 









4.00 
4.51 
6.72 
5. OS 


The St 
Per 


17.655.561 
100.00 


15,596,888 
88.46 


1,235,700 

1 


822,973 
4.64 









PreeediiiL!,' tables have defined for the entire outijut the proportions 
shiijijcd. sold at lionu' and eonsunicd; l>ut. in fact, no part of the 
])roduct of local mines is sliippod, and a ])art of the protluct of all 



40 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



shipping mines is sold to the local consumer. This justifies the draft- 
ing of the above table, which shows how the tonnage of shipping 
mines alone is disposed of. Naturally these percentages differ but 
little from those in a former table, as the tonnage of shipping mines 
is but little less than the total output. The principal difference is in 
the percentage sold to the local trade, and the respective figures are 
11.56 per cent of all coal and 6.90 per cent of the coal raised by the 
shipping mines. 

DISTRIBUTION OF COAL TO RAILROADS. 

This year, for the first time, mine owners have l)een asked to report 
the number of tons shipped on each of the railroads to which they are 
tributary, including coal delivered to locomotives for consumption. 
The information thus obtained has been condensed into the following- 
statement of the total tonnage delivered, during the year, to each of 
thirty-six railroads, arranged in the order of their importance as coal 



Illinois Coal delivered to Illinois Railroads — 1898. {On Cars for 
Transportation and to Locomotives for Consumption.) 







4,113,660 tons 


3 


Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Co 

Wabash Railroad Co 


1,335,842 " 
1 285 493 ' ' 


4 


Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad Co 


1, 142 130 ' ' 


5 


Chicago & Alton Railroad Co 

Baltimore & Ohio .Southwestern Railroad Co 


1,116,563 " 
7i:9, 939 ' ' 


7 

s 

9 
10 


Elgin. Joliet & Eastern Railway Co 

Chicago & Northwestern Railway Co 

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Co 

Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis Railway 

Mobile & Ohio Railroad Co 


585,018 '• 
466,818 •' 
449, 236 • ' 
447, 136 • ' 
419.222 " 


I"* 


Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co 


371,291 " 


r^ 


Cleveland Cincinnati Chicago & St Louis Railway Co 


370,651 " 


14 


Louisville Evansville & St Louis Railroad Co.. 


367, 510 • ' 


15 


St Louis Peoria & Northern Railway Co . 


329,940 ■' 


16 


Chicago Rock Island & Pacific Railway Co 


285, 408 ' ' 






251.755 " 






243, 189 • ' 


19 


Toledo St Louis & Kansas City Railroad Co 


237, 860 ■ ' 


20 

21 


Peoria & Pekin Union Railway 

Rock Island & Peoria Railway Co 


202,043 '• 
187, 833 ' ' 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Statement — Concluded. 



41 



St. Louis, Chicagro ct St. Paul Railway Co 

Iowa Central Railway Co 

Peoria. Decatur & Evansville Railway Co — 

Indiana, Illinois & Iowa Railroad Co 

Wabash, Chester & Western Railroad Co 

St. Louis, Belleville & Southern Railway Co. 

.Jacksonville & St. Louis Railway 

Centralia & Chester Railroad Co 



;{0| Fulton County Nwrrow Gauge Railway Co. 



Lake Erie & Western Railroad Co 

Indiana, Decatur & Western Railroad Co 

Toluca & Eastern Railroad Co 

Belleville & Carondelet Railroad Co 

Pawnee Railroad 

Litchfield, Carrollton & Western Railroad Co. 
Total 



409 tons 

314 

441 

295 

585 

500 

999 

975 

100 

100 

000 

900 

199 

321 

448 

173 



These figures represent only that coal which originates on the sev- 
eral lines and not that which is received by one road from another 
for transportation. It appears that the first five roads on the list 
have received from their mines 8,993,688 tons, or more than half of 
all the coal shipped; that is to say, more than all the 31 other roads 
together. ( )f these five, the Illinois Central, at the head of the list, 
handles nearly as much as the other four great coal roads together, 
and, in fact, more than one-fourth, or 26.42 per cent of all the coal 
carried by all the roads. The amount of the original coal traffic 
of any road depends, of course, ui^on its mileage, the mineral resources 
of the territory through which it passes and the nature of the markets 
to which it has access. Presumably the tonnage which flows to each 
of the Illinois roads is an approximate measure of the aliove advan- 
tages which each enjoys. 

Geographically the sources from which each of these roads receives 
its coal is shown in the following table, giving the tonnage contributed 
l>y each county to each road: 



42 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Table X\1I— Railroads which liave hauled the Coal Oidpul of the 
State, and ttie tonnage by Counties contributed io eacJi. 



Illinois Central Railroad Co.— 

Kankakee 28. 328 tons . 

LaSulIe 1 227. 014 ' ' 

Livin gston 1«, 40ii " 

Marshall 42, 500 " 

Woodford (14. 700 ; ; 

Logan 50. 2ti5 

Macou ! 65, 065 " 

McLean i 12. 800 " 

Christian i 2:H2, 564 

Sangamon | 343, 980 ' " 

Shelby 51. 376 " 

Marion : 623. 788 ' ' 

St. Clair 34S, 042 ' ' 

Jaekson ' 675.793 " 

Perry ■ 654, 440 

Randolph 50.123 '• 

Washington ' 14, 400 

Williamson | 610, 643 * ' 

Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Co.— ' 

Marion ' 6, 000 tons . 

Vermilion ; 1.104.762 " 

Williamson - : 225, 080 ' ' 

Wabash Railroad Co.— 

Kankakee ! 26, 610 tons . 

LaSalle : 570 ; ; 

Livingston ; 288 

Macon 118,310 " 

Vermilion 119, 363 

Christian 150,500 " 

Macoupin 357.889 [ | 

Montgomery I 27. 451 

Sangamon 472,055 

Madison ; 1 2. 457 ' ' 

Chicago, Burlington & yuiney Railroad Co.— 

LaSalle I 242, 511 tons . 

Livingston 1,137 

Bureau ! 188. 335 " 

Henry. ' 23. 454 " 

Mercer ^ 152, 120 ' ' 

Peoria : 116, 110 * 

Fulton ! 343,608 " 

Hancock 4, 200 ; ; 

McDonough '. 52, 460 

Schuyler 510 '| 

Scott 17, 655 

Chicago & Alton Railroad Co.— , 

Grundy 106,444 tons. 

LaSalle : 74,318 •; 

Livingston ; 502 

Will 29, 611 " 

Logan 28, 960 " 

McLean 750 

Menard ' 115,286 

Macoupin ', 459, 819 ; ; 

Sangamon [ 300, 873 

Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern Railroad Co.— ; 

Christian ' 13,991 tons. 

Sangamon , 76, 293 ' ' 

Clinton t 380,043 ;; 

Marion 26,525 

St. Clair 23 3. 137 

Elgin, .loliet 6i Eastern Railway Co.— 

Grundy j 585.018 tons 

Chicago & Northwestern Railway Co.— \ 

Bureau ' 466,818 tons 

Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad Co.— 

Grundy 45. 885 tons 

LaSalle 143,351 ;; 

Livingston 6, 176 

Marshall 193. 242 ' ' 

Woodford 60, 582 



4,113,660 ton^ 



1.285,493 tons. 



1,142,130 ton.s. 



1,116,563 tou.s. 

729,989 tons. 
585,018 tons. 
466,818 tons. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



43 



Table XFJJ— Continued. 



Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis Railway— 


151,050 tons. 
74.082 " 

138,878 " 
83, 126 • ' 


















417, 136 tons 


Mobile & Ohio Railroad Cc- 

St Clair 


11,398 tons. 
100,211 " 

68.000 " 
179.613 " 






Perry 










419,222 tons. 


Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co.— 

St. Clair 


253,269 tons. 
10.022 " 
3, 000 ■ • 
5.000 " 


Gallatin 














371,291 tons. 


Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis Railway Co.— 


1.439 tons. 
2, 470 • • 
4,000 " 
116,019 " 
44,040 " 
69,972 " 
62, 769 ' ' 
840 ■' 
69.102 " 

13,923 tons. 
5,000 " 

348,587 ■' 

131,391 tons. 
11,212 ' 
187,337 " 


LaSalle 




McLean 

Vermilion 
















Saline 




Louisville, Evansville & St. Louis Railroad Co.— 


370,651 tons. 


.lefiferson 

St Clair 




St. Louis, Peoria and Northern Railway Co.— 


367,510 tons. 












329,940 tons. 


Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railway Co.— 


126 tons. 
130, 122 • ' 
145,009 " 
10,151 " 

8,647 tons. 
226,812 " 
16. 296 ' ' 

42.967 tons. 
13^.222 •• 
67.000 " 
1.030 •• 


La Salle 








Marshall 




Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad Co.— 


285,408 tons. 






St Clair 




Toledo. Peoria and Western Railway Co.— 


251,755 lons. 


Peoria. 




Fulton 










243.189 tons. 


Toledo. St. Louis and Kansas City Railroad Co.— 


149.470 tons. 
78, 400 ' ' 
9, 990 ' • 


Bond 










237,860 tons. 


Peoria and Pekin Union Railway— 


200,318 tons. 
1,725 •■ 


Tazewell 


202,043 tons. 


Rock Island and Peoria Railway Co.— 


185.565 tons. 
2.268 •• 


Rock Island 






187,833 tons. 


St. Louis, Chicago and St. Paul Railway Co.— 


140,409 tons. 




146,409 tous. 


Iowa Central Railway Co.— 


85,423 tons. 
58.891 " 

49.441 tons 

7.000 '• 






Peoria, Decatur and Evansville Railway Co.— 

Logan . . 


142,314 tons. 


Ta/ewell 






56,14] ton.s. 



44 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XF7J.— Concluded. 



Indiana. Illinois and Iowa Railroad Co.— 


23,170 tons. 
24, 125 ' ' 

39,585 tons. 

38,500 tons, 

21,762 tons. 

7, 167 ' ' 

441 " 

5,629 " 




La Salle 




Wabash, Chester and Western Railroad Co.— 

Perry 


47,295 tons. 


St. liouis, Belleville and Southern Railway Co.- 

St. Clair 


39,585 tons. 


Jacksonville and St Louis Railway— 

Macoupin 


38,500 tons. 






Bond 










34,999 tons. 


Centralia and Chester Railroad Co.— 


975 tons. 
19,500 " 
5,500 " 

23,100 tons. 

15,100 tons. 
8,000 •• 


Randolph 








Fulton County Narrow Gauge Railway Co.— 
Fulton 


25,975 tons. 


.Lake Erie and Western Railroad Co.- 

McLean 


23,100 tons. 


Tazewell 






23,100 tons. 


Indiana. Decatur and Western Railroad Co.— 


21,000 tons. 
17,900 tons. 

8,199 tons. 

3.321 tons. 


Toluco and Eastern Railroad Co.— 

Marshall 


21,000 tons. 


Belleville and Carondelet Railroad Co.— 

St. Clair 


17,900 tons. 


Pawnee Railroad— 


8,199 tons. 




3,321 tons. 


Litchfield. Carrollton and Western Railroad Co.— 

Macoupin 


1,448 tons. 




1,448 tons. 


Total by rail 


25,000 tons. 

3,015 ■• 

700 '• 


SHIPPED BY WATER. 


15,568,173 tons. 












28,715 tons. 






Total '^hipped 


15,596,888 tons. 









The Illinois Central Company draws its coal from eighteen counties 
distributed along its main line, from LaSalle county on the north to 
Williamson county in the extreme south. Four of these counties 
furnish this road with over 600,000 tons each and eight of them over 
200,000 tons each per annum. On the other hand, the Chicago & 
Eastern Illinois Company has its tonnage, in effect, from two counties 
only, receiving over a million tons from Vermilion county and a 
quarter of a million from Williamson county. The Wabash Company 
has ten prolific counties, the most of which are the rich coal counties 
of the central part of the State, while the Burlington finds its coal 
in eleven counties, all but one of which are west of the Illinois 
river. The Alton road penetrates rich coal fields in nine counties, 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



45 



situated on its main line to St. Louis. The so-called Big Four Com- 
pany also gets coal from nine counties rather widely distributed over 
the State. The Elgin. Joliet (t Eastern takes over half a million 
tons from Grundy county alone. The Baltimore & Ohio Southwest- 
ern gets over three-quarters of a million tons from five counties on 
its lines in the southern part of the State. Eight roads have coal 
from only one county each; six have two counties each; six have- 
three counties each, and six have four counties each. 

As a complement to tho presentation of the tonnage of railroads 
by counties, the following table exhibits the tonnage of counties by 
the railroads which handle it: 

Table XY Ill—Counties which have produced the Commercial Coal 
of the State and the tonnage delivered, to the several Raih'oads 
in each. 



Saneamon County— 
Wabash 


472.055 tons. 
343.980 •• 
300,873 " 
146,409 " 
138,878 " 
76.293 " 
11,212 " 
3,3J1 " 








Chicago & Alton 




St. Louis. Chieagro & St. Paul 








Baltimore & Oliio Southwestern. 








Pawnee 






1.493,021 tons. 


.St. Clair County- 
Louisville & Nashville 


353,269 tons. 
348,587 " 
348.042 " 
2.33, 137 ' ' 
38,500 " 
16.296 " 
11,398 •• 
8, 199 ' ' 

1,104,762 tons. 
119,363 " 
116,019 " 

459.819 tons. 
•357,889 " 
131,391 " 

74,082 ;; 

2i;762 •* 
1, 448 • ' 


Illinois Central. 








Terrp Haute & Indianapolis 




Mobile & Ohio 




Belleville <t Carondelet .. . . 




Vermilion County- 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois 


1,357,428 tons. 


Wabash.. 




Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 




Macoupin County- 
Chicago & Alton 


1,340.144 tons. 


Wabash . 








Chicago, Peoria & St Louis 








.lacksonville & St. Louis 




Litchfield, Carrollton & Western. 






1.116.363 ton?. 


LaSalle County- 
Chicago Burlington & Quincy 


242,511 tons. 
227,944 " 
143,351 " 
130. 122 ' ' 
74.318 " 
24, 125 ' ' 
2,470 " 
570 " 

675,793 tons. 
160.211 •• 

010.643 tons. 
225,080 •• 






Atchison, Topeka & Santa F<^, 












Indiana, Illinois & Iowa . 




Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 




Wabash 




.Jackson County— 

11 inois ('entral 


845,411 tons. 


Mobile & Ohio 




Williamson County- 
Illinois Central , 


836.004 tons. 








835.723 tons. 



46 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XTT/J— Continued. 



Bureau County— 


466.818 tons. 
188,335 •* 
145,009 " 

654.949 tons. 
68,000 •' 
39,585 " 




Chicagfo, Burlington <fc Quincy 




Chicago, Rock Island ct Pacific 




Perry County- 
Illinois Central 

Mobile & Ohio 


800.162 tons. 


Wabash, Chester & Western 






762,5.34 tons. 


<Trundy County— 

Elgin, Joliet & Western 


585.018 tons. 
106, 444 
45,885 " 
1,439 " 
126 " 


Chicago & Alton 




Atchison. Topeka & Santa Fe .. 




Cleveland. Cincinnati, Chicago & St. Louis 

Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific 


738.912 tons. 


JVIarion County- 
Illinois Central . 


623,788 tons. 
26.525 •■ 
13,923 " 
6,000 " 
5,629 " 
975 " 


Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 








Chicago & Eastern Illinois 




Jacksonville & St. Louis 










676,840 tons. 


I'eoria County— ■ 

Peoria & Pekin Union 


200,318 tons. 
1.32,222 •• 
116, 110 ' ' 
83.423 " 
3,015 " 






Chicago, Burlington & Quincy . . . 




Iowa Central 

Illinois River 






535,088 tons. 


Madison County— 

Terre Haute & Indianapolis 

St. Louis, Peoria & Northern 


226,812 tons. 

187,337 •' 
83,126 •* 
12,457 " 
9,990 " 


Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis 

Toledo. St. Louis <fc Kansas City 

Wabash 






519,722 tons. 


Fulton County- 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 


343,608 tons. 
67.000 •• 
58.891 '• 
23, 100 ' ' 


Toledo, Peoria & Western 

Iowa Central 

Pulton County Narrow Gauge. 






492,599 tons. 


Christian County- 
Illinois Central 

Wabash. .... .. 


232,564 tons. 

150.500 " 
44. 040 ' ' 
13,991 " 

380.043 tons. 






Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern 

•Clinton County- 


441,095 tons. 




380,043 tons. 


Mercer County- 


185.565 tons. 
152. 120 • ' 


Chicago. Burlington & Quincy 


337,685 tons. 


Menard County- 
Chicago, Peoria & St. Louis 

Chicago & Alton 


151.050 tOBS. 
116,286 " 

193,242 tons. 
42,500 " 
17,900 " 
10. 151 • • 

179,613 tons. 
50, 123 • • 
19,500 •' 


Marshall County- 

Atchison Topeka <fc Santa Fe- 


266, 33& tons. 






Toluca & Eastern 








Randolph County- 
Mobile & Ohio 


263,793 tons. 


Illinois Central. 




Centralia & Chester 






249,236 tons. 


Montgomery County- 
Toledo, St. Louis & Kansas City 


149,470 tons. 
62,769 " 
27.451 " 
7, 167 ' • 






Wabash..... 




Jacksonville & St. Louis 






246.857 tons. 



COAL IX ILLINOIS. 

Tahh XVIII— Continued. 



Maoon County— 1 






Wabash 


118,310 tons. 




Illinois Central ! 


«5,065 •• 




Indiana, Dec-atur \- Western 


21,000 •' 


204.375 tons. 






Logran (Joutiry— 1 






Illinois (.Ifnrral 


50,l'fi5 tons. 




Peoria, Decatur \- E vansville 


vj.m •• 




Chit-ago A: Alton 


ZS, 960 " 








12S.(:(;6 tons. 


Woodford County— 1 






Illinois Central 


64.700 tons. 






00, 58L' ' • 








125,282 tons. 


Bond County— 


1 




Toledti. St. Louis <t Kansas City i 


78,400 tons.] 




Terre Haute tt Indianapolis i 


8,047 




-Taeksouville &, St. Louis ' 


441 " 








S7,4S8 tons. 






Kankakee County— , 








28,328 tons,! 




Wabash ', 


■X. 610 ' • 1 




Indiana, Illinois & Iowa i 


23.170 '• , 








7s, 108 tons 


Saline County- 






Cleveland, Cincinnati. Chicago it St. Louis 


69,102 tons. 








69,102 tons 


Livingston County- 






Toledo, Peoria & Western 


42,967 tons. 




Illinois Central 


16,400 •• 






6. 176 • ' 




Chicago, Burlington & Quincy 


1, 137 ' ' 
502 " 




Chieatro & Alton 




Wabash 


288 " 








67,470 tons- 


McDonough County- 






Chicago, Burlington & Quincv 


52,460 tons. 






52,460 ton.s. 






Shelby County— 






Illinois Central 


51,376 tons. 








51,376 tons. 


Henry County- 






Chicago. Burlington & Quincy 


23,451 tons. 




Kock River 


25,000 •' 








48,454 tons. 


McLean County- 






Lake Erie ik Western 


15,100 tons. 




Illinoi.s Central 


12,800 " 






4 000 




Toledo, Peoria & We.stern 


1,000 •• 




Chicago & Alton 


750 •' 








33,650 tons. 






Will County- 






Chicago iV: Alton 


29.611 tons. 


2'.i,611 tons 






Washington Countv- 








14.400 tons. 
.5,500 •• 




( 'eiitralia A: Chester 




L.niisvillf k Nashville 


5,000 " 








24,900 tons 


Scott County- 






Chicago, Burlington ik Quincy 


17,6.55 tons. 








17,655 tons 


Tazewell County- 






Lake Erie & Western 


8,000 tons. 




Peoria, Decatur it Evansville 


7,000 •' 






1.725 " 








16,725 tons 


<Tallatin County- 








10.022 tons. 






10,022 tons 


Jefferson County- 






Louisville, Evansville it St. Louis 


' 5,000 tons. 




Louisville & Nashville 


3,000 •• 






8,000 tons 


Hancock County- 






Chicago, Burlington it Quincy . . 


4.200 tons. 








4,200 tons 



48 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Table XFJ/7— Continued. 



Rock Island County- 


2,268 tons. 
700 •' 










2,968 tons. 


Johnson County— 


840 tons. 




8!0 tons. 


Schuyler County— 


510 tons. 




540 tons. 


The State 


15,596 888 tons 









Of the four principal coal-bearing counties which export more than 
a million tons each per year, Sangamon and St. Clair have shipping 
facilities over eight railroads each, and Macoupin over seven; but 
Vermilion has only three, and gives over a million tons to a single 
one of them. LaSalle count}^ has eight outlets by rail; two couiities 
have six each, four have five, four have four, and ten have only one 
each. 

The Possible Output of Existing Mines. 

The contrast between the actual output of the mines of the State 
and the possible output of the same mines under favorable conditions 
is illustrated in the following table. This table is the result of a 
special inquiry addressed to the operator of each mine, asking for 
the possible producing capacity of his plant if operated continuously 
with his present equipment. This, it will be obse'-red, is not an es- 
timate based on what might be produced if the hauling, hoisting and 
handling facilities should be enlarged to their limit. A summary of 
the estimates made in response to this inquiry is presented in the 
following totals by districts: 

Table XIX — Comparison of Actual Output iv'dh Possible Output 
of Existing Mines, by Districts. 



District. 


Output— 1898. 
(Tons.) 


Possible 
output. 
(Tons.) 


Per cent 

of possible 

increase. 


First . 


2,209.362 
2.551.110 
721.846 
2,572,059 
8,925.690 
3. 459, 932 
3.159,300 


5.121,710 
5,908,746 
1,272,500 
6,633.425 
9,537,550 
7,180,900 
6, 428, 100 


131.82 


Second 

Third 


131.61 

76.28 
119.05 


Fifth 


142 95 


Sixth. ■ .. .. 


107.54 


Seventh. .. 


103.47 






The State 


18,599,299 


41.082,925 


120.88 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. 49 

The present capacity of existing mines is here found t :> 1)' over 
forty million tons, or more than twice the actual output rc^ported for 
the year. But this year is not a normal one, and, for purposes of 
comparison, an output of something over twenty millions should be 
assumed as representing a normal demand. Even with this under- 
standing, the legitimate deduction remains that the mining industry 
as at present developed in this State is equal to an output twice as 
great as it has yet been called upon to deliver. The capacity of 
increase in output as represented by the percentages of the table 
appears largest in the First, Second, Fourth and Fifth districts; least 
in the Third, and about 100 per cent in the Sixth and Seventh. 
Great variation is naturally found upon an examination of the re- 
ports of individual mines, as they appear in the subsequent county 
tables. Some have a capacity for increase five and even seven fold; 
others, none wdiatever, owing to the fact that the mineral is nearly or 
quite exhausted. Fourteen selected mines which were active during 
the greater part of the general strike claim a possible production 
only 26 per cent in excess of that which is reported for them for the 
year. Yet the computed average for the State at large shows that 
the given output might be increased by 120.88 jper cent with present 
equipment, if the need should arise for it. It should be observed in 
this connection that the majority of first-class plants, which are the 
real producers of commercial coal, are capable of indefinite expansion 
to meet any extraordinary demands which may arise in excess of 
their present capacity. An inquiry as to the greatest possible devel- 
opment of plant and enlargement of output would certainly have 
produced totals very much larger than those given, and, it is possible, 
such greater totals would be more nearly a true exponent of the real 
capacity of Illinois mines. 

Days of Active Operation. 
The customary analysis of the days of active operations for this 
industry for the year affords the following results for the several 
districts and the State: 

—4 



50 STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Table XX. — Days of Active Operation, by Districts. 



District. 


Average Working Days 
OF All Mines. 


Average Working Days 

OF Shipping Mines 

Only. 




Mines. 


Men. 


Days. 


Mines. 


Men. 


Days. 




86 
184 
217 
94 
79 
98 
123 


7,377 
6.799 
1,800 
4,030 
6,093 
4,662 
4,265 


163.3 

161.3 

135.4 

162.3 

191.6 

182 

135.9 


39 
48 
21 
39 
51 
72 
59 


7.011 
5,966 
1,141 
3,608 
5,976 
4,518 
4,077 






171 t 


Third 


187.5 




190 


Fifth 


172.3 


Sixth 


170.6 




186.8 






The State 


881 


35, 026 


156.8 


329 


32,297 


174 7 







The level average for the working time of all mines is here given 
as 156.8 days for each; last year this average was 167.1 days. The 
average working days for 329 shipping mines is 174.7 days; last year 
the average for this class of mines was 185.5 days. This decline in 
average activity is, of course, accounted for by the strike which pre- 
vailed so long throughout the State, and the average loss of time 
would doubtless have been much more had not the activity been so 
great and continuous at points not affected by the strike, and at all 
points after the strike was settled. 

Considered by districts, the average days of activity are found to 
range from 144.5 in the First district, to 190 days in the Fourth, with 
other districts showing averages between these. In the First dis- 
trict, and in the Fifth and Sixth, it will be observed that the average 
for all mines is greater than that for shii^ping mines. This arises 
from the fact that, owing to the unusual conditions, the local mines in 
these districts were active for longer periods than the larger mines; 
in the other districts this experience was reversed. These figures 
represent the average number of days each mine was running, and 
are derived by dividing the sum of all the active days reported by 
the number of mines reporting them. This computation consequently 
does not bring out the actual or average days of work of individual 
miners, though the result is an approximate statement of the work- 
ing time of men employed 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



51 



An examination of the followinii; table affords an opportunity to 
compare the exi^erience of former years with that of this year: 

Table XXI — Days of Active Operation for a Series of Years, by 

Districts. 





1893. 


1894. 


1895. 


1896. 


1897. 


1898. 


District. 




Days... 
Mines.. 


Q 




1 


a 


1 


«j 


1 
Q 




1 


First 


38 
26 
80 
56 
101 


220 
228 
215 
251 
233 


35 ■ 161.5 
26 171 


26 
28 
66 
64 
94 


159.4 

176.1 

173 

188.5 

192.6 


38 
46 
27 
40 
50 
72 
49 


166 
198 
157 
210 
197 
196 
164 


35 
46 
19 
36 
50 
73 
51 


166.9 
183.2 
158.6 
207.7 
202.1 
194.8 
165.5 


39 
48 
21 
39 
51 
72 
59 


144.5 


Second 


171 1 


Tliird 


81 
63 
90 


182.9 
194.7 
186.9 


187.5 




190 


Fifth 


172.3 


Sixth 


170.6 


Seventh 














186 8 
















The State 


301 


229.6 295 


183.1 


278 


182 2 


322 


186 


310 


185 5 


329 


174 7 























This table relates to shipping mines only and shows the number of 
these on which each average is based. The reports of 1894 were the 
first after the financial depression which began in 1893, and as a re- 
sult of which coal mining as an industry dropped from an average 
activity represented by 230 days' operations in the year to 183. 
From this low average the business has never yet recovered, and 
owing to the strike of 1897. it suffered the still greater loss of time 
indicated by this year's average, Comparing, however, the last two 
years by districts, it is discovered that in the Third and the Seventh 
the mines enjoyed a greater duration of activity during the strike 
year than in the former year, and that the real loss of time was sus- 
tained by the mines of the other districts. 

Average Value of Coal. 
The average value of coal per ton at the mines, as reported by the 
several mine owners, is arrived at by dividing the net proceeds of all 
sales made of each grade by the number of tons of each grade sold. 
These values for individual mines are combined by proper calcula- 
tions into averages for counties, for districts and for the State, the 
two last of which appear in the table here given: 



52 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XXll— Average Value of Coal Per Ton at the Mine, by 

Districts. 



District 


Total tons. 


Av. value 
per ton. 


Tons of 
lump coal. 


Av. value 
per ton. 


Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Av. value 
per ton. 




2,209,362 
2,551.110 
721,846 
2,572,059 
3,925,690 
3.459,932 
3,159,300 


$0.9163 
1.0229 
.9818 
.8307 
.6564 
.6499 
.7161 


1,716,685 
2,080,702 
590, 299 
2, 178, 132 
2,718,175 
2,713,399 
2,211,403 


$1.1045 
1.16 
1.108 
.9005 
.80 
.746 
.868 


492,677 
470,408 
131,547 
393, 927 
1,207,515 
746,533 
947,897 








Third 




Fourth 




Fifth 


.3202 


Sixth 


2994 


Seventh 


.3777 






The State 


18,599,299 


$0.7832 


14,208,795 


$0,918 


4,390,504 


$0.3535 



The average value of lump coal per ton for all the year, or for that 
part of the year which remained after the close of the strike, is found 
to have been 91.8 cents at the mine. This is 6.6 cents per ton 
greater than the average for the preceding year. It is also the mean 
between the highest average value for the year, $1.16 per ton in 
the Second district, and the lowest, 74.6 cents per ton in the Sixth 
district. 

This constitutes some evidence of a reaction from the downward 
tendency in prices which has prevailed for so many years, and still 
further evidence of the permanency of such reaction and of a general 
upward movement is gathered from the experience of the trade since 
the above figures were reported. Compared by districts, it is found 
that the average gain has been about ten cents per ton in the four 
southern districts and only about three cents in the northern dis- 
tricts. At the time these reports were mace, however, the industry 
had not yet fully adjusted itself to the new conditions which resulted 
from the strike, and it is probable that the added experience of the 
current year will be necessary to develop all the effects of the terms 
of settlement then made. 

The range of average values for a series of years is exhibited here- 
with: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



53 



Table XXIII — Average Value of Lump Coal Per Ton at the 
Mine for a Series of Years, 1882-1898. 



Year. 


Tons 

of lump coal 

produced. 


Average 

value 
per ton. 


Year. 


Tons 

of lump coal 

produced. 


Average 

value 
per ton. 


1882 


9,115.653 
10,030.991 
10,101.005 
9,791.874 
9,246,435 
10,278,890 
11,855,188 
11,597,963 
12,638,364 


1.48 
1.26 
1.17 
1.10 
1.085 
1.123 
1.078 
1.019 


1891 


13, 960, 224 
14,730,963 
16,112,899 
13,865.284 
14, 045, 962 
13, 990, 924 
14,672.241 
14,208.795 


$1 008 




1892 


1 029 


1884 


1893 


1.025 


1885 


1894 


1 009 


1886 


1895 


932 


1887 


1896 


.899 


1888 


1897 


852 


1889 


1898 


.918 


1890 











This is a recapitulation of the annual output of the tons of lumj) 
coal for each of seventeen years, with the average value of the same 
per ton at the mine for each of the years, as computed in this office. 
This continued, though not always uniform, decline in the value of 
the product of mines from year to year in this State, and pre- 
sumably throughout the country, has often been a matter of observa- 
tion and comment in these reports, and it is gratifying to be able to 
record a figure for this year which is not less than all the others. 

Mine Employes. 
The customary enumeration of employes of mines results in the 
following totals for districts and the State: 

Table XXIV. — Analysis of Employes, by Districts. 





Employes. 


District. 


Miners. 


Others 
under- 
ground. 


Total 
under- 
ground. 


Above 
ground. 


Aggregate 


First 


5,935 
5.336 
1,502 
2, 921 
4.424 
3. 415 


948 
850 
142 
743 
1.013 
642 
71.1 


6,883 
6,186 
1,644 
3,664 
5,437 
4.087 


494 
613 
156 
366 
656 
575 


7,877 




6,799 


Third 


1,800 




4.030 


Fifth 


6. 093 


Sixth . 


4 662 




4,265 










The State 


26, 520 1 5. 082 


31, 602 1 3. 124 


35, 026 















54 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The whole number of emiiloyes here reported is 35,026; last year 
the number was 33,788, or 1,238 less than the present number. The 
fact that an increase in employes is reported for a disastrous year and 
a small output, is not as inconsistent as it appears; it is, in fact, a 
case of cause and efPect and another of the results of the strike. 
These totals represent the average number under employment during 
the year, and the average is reached by dividing the sum of all the 
men on all pay-rolls by the number of pay-rolls. With the resump- 
tion of business at the close of the strike the demand for men was as 
unusual as the demand for coal, and this naturally led to an increase 
of the working force wherever it was x^ossible to acquire it. The 
semi-monthly pay-rolls consequently grew and the resultant average 
is larger, though the output is less. Comparing this table with that 
of last year, it is found that in the First and Second districts the 
numl)er of employes is less, l)ut that in all others, especially in the 
southern part of the State, the number is greater, than formerly. The 
separation of employes underground from those above, and miners 
from others, shows that substantially 10 per cent of all the mine 
workmen are on the surface, and that 16 per cent of those under- 
ground are laborers of various kinds rather than miners. 

The number of employes reported for each of seventeen years is 
given in the table below by districts: 

Table XXV. — Emploijes for Sixteen Years. 



Year. 


First 
District. 


Second 
District. 


Third 
District. 


Fourth 
District. 


Fifth 
District. 


Sixth 
District. 


Seventh 
District. 


The 

State. 


1883 


7,566 
8,013 
7,463 
7,613 
7,915 
8,623 
9,014 
8,258 
9,128 
9,572 
8,831 
10,280 
9.644 
9,380 
7,632 
7,377 


3,211 
3,616 
3,391 
3.599 
4,068 
4,914 
4,498 
4,099 
5,089 
4,865 
5,974 
6,714 
7,184 
7,103 
6,872 
6,799 


4,070 
5,018 
5,213 
4,870 
4,903 
5,250 
5,117 
5,171 
6,458 
6,453 
6,964 
7,112 
6,607 
2,134 
1.635 
1,800 


4,417 
4,781 
4,950 
5,197 
4,934 
5,086 
5,679 
5,685 
5,881 
6,542 
7.021 
7,750 
8,005 
4,467 
4,021 
4,030 


4,675 
4,147 
4,429 
4,567 
4,984 
5,537 
5,764 
5,361 
6,395 
6.200 
6,780 
6,621 
7,190 
5,758 
5.672 
6,093 






23. 939 


1884 






25, 575 


IQQ^ 






25, 446 


1»SR 






25,846 








26,804 • 









29.410 









30,076 









28, 574 


1891 






32,951 








33,632 








35,390 


1894 






38. 477 








38,630 


1896 


4,374 
4,100 
4,662 


3.816 
3,855 
4,265 


37,032 


1897 

1898 


33,788 
35, 026 







COAL IN ILLINOIS. OO 

The apjDarent statement here is that the number of mine workmen 
has materially fallen off since lb9<). The fact is that since that year 
the number reported is the average for the year, while before that it 
was the j^ractice to take the highest number emiDloyed at any time 
during the year. It is believed that, although the highest number 
may approximately indicate the whole number of men available for 
mine work in the State, the average number employed throughout 
the year is the better number for record for comparisons and for all 
statistical purposes. Substituting the average for the highest num- 
ber for three years prior to 1897 we have the following result for five 
years: 

1894 32,635 ! 1897 33,788 

1895 31,962 1898 35,026 

1896 33,054 j 

From this the true proportions of the relative working force for 
these years are made apparent, and the fact of a normal increase in- 
stead of a decrease is established. 

Prices Paid for Mining. 
Among the more important results of the recent strike was the 
agreement by the parties in controversy upon a uniform tonnage 
basis of wages, for both machine and other mines, and upon the 
gross ton instead of the screened ton as the unit of computation. 
This very much facilitates the making of a scale of uniform applica- 
tion, and equally simplifies the statistics of the subject. The result 
is that a single table is now made to cover the facts in regard to the 
whole output more satisfactorily than many tables have done here- 
tofore. 



56 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XXVI. — Average Prices Paid for Mming by Hand and 
With Machines, hy Districts. 





Miking BY Hand. 


Mining W 

CHIN 






GROSS-TON BASIS. 


SCRKENEDTON BASIS. 


ES. 




Tons on 
which aver- 
age is based. 


Average 

price per 

ton. 


Tons on 
which aver- 
age is based. 


Averave . 

price per 

ton. 


Tons on 
which aver- 
age is based. 


Average 

price per 

ton. 




2,144,240 
2,122.576 
493.084 
2,016.457 
2,871.012 
2,334.341 
2.576,923 


$0 60.3 
58.5 
45 

43.67 
38.7 
40.4 
34.4 






6,022* 
87.944 
10,412 
555,602 
1.045,678t 
1,018.0911 
582,377 


$0 37 


Second 

Third 


340. 590 
218. 350 


SO 75.2 
83.4 


27 
31 




27.22 


Fifth 






31.95 


Sixth 






33.6 








30.41 










The State 


14,558.633 


!t0 44.09 


558.940 


$0 78.4 


3, 306, 126 


$0 31.37 



* Mining of 59.100 tons in this district paid for by the day. 
t Mining of 9.000 tons in this district paid for by the day. 
I Mining of 107,500 tons in this district paid for by the day. 

The general statement embodied in this table is that out of a gross 
output of 18,599,299 tons, 14,558,63H tons, or 78.27 per cent was paid 
for on the gross-ton basis at an average for the State of 44.09 cents per 
ton; 558,940 tons, or 3 per cent was paid for on the screened-ton 
basis at an average rate of 78.4 cents per ton; o, 306,126 tons, or 17.78 
per cent was mined by machines and paid for at the average rate of 
31.37 cents per ton, and that 175,600 tons, or 0.95 of 1 per cent of 
the machine work was paid for by the day. The smallness of the 
percentages paid* for by the screened ton and by the day is substan- 
stantial evidence of the universality with which the terms of the 
agreement have been put into effect. Only 3 per cent of the total 
output was paid for on the old basis of the screened ton, and this oc- 
curred only among the local mines in rural districts, whose practice 
has no influence wiiatever on the industry at large. Some of the 
machine tonnage reported here as paid for by the day comes from 
mines where a few machines were operated experimentally, but in 
the case reported in the Sixth district the practice of paying by the day 
has now been abandoned and the scale rate and method adopted. 

This radical cliange in the principle and practice governing the 
payment of wages effectually destroys the parallel which has hereto- 
fore existed between the statistics of one year with another in these 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



57 



reports. Last year about six million tons of the output were paid 
for by the gross ton, six millions by the screened ton, and the re- 
maining eight millions by so many devious and different methods 
that it was impossible to tabulate them, thus leaving more than a 
third of the out^^ut unrepresented in the State average. This year 
9(5 per cent of the entire output is accounted for under definite heads 
in the foregoing table, and of all the hand-mined coal, 97 i^er cent is 
paid for on the uniform basis of the gross ton. To compare State 
averages, computed under such conflicting conditions, can not be 
conclusive as to the percentage of increase in the price of all mining. 
As to gross-ton mining alone, the average rate for less than one- third 
of the output was for last year .34.2fi cents per ton; this year the 
average for practically the whole of it is 44.09 cents per ton. This 
is obviously a defective comparison, and none whatever can be 
drawn between the last year's prices for screened coal and this year's 
prices for unscreened coal. Statistics of the strike, gathered and 
published in the last report of this office, showed the advance in prices 
gained by the miners in all parts of the State and an average for the 
State at large of 26.42 per cent. 

Next in importance to the rate of wages, in the estimation of the 
miner, is the frequency with which wages are paid. The statistics 
of this subject for the several districts and the State are compiled 
herewith: 

Table XXVII — Frequencij of Wage Payments, by Districts. 



Wages Paid Weekly, 



Mines. Men. Tons 



Wages 
Paid Semi-Monthlt. 



I Wages Paid Monthly. 



Mines. Men. Ton 



Mines. Men. Tons 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State 



142,840 
111,876 

29,807 
536,237 
8,681 
26.924 
72.658 



,023 



5,766 
1,573 
3,183 
6,050 
4,132 
3,825 



2,066,222 
2,054,243 
681,253 
2,025,554 
3,912.116 
3,053,413 
2,904,210 
16,697,011 



17 j 
451 
282: 

1,5.38! 

i 



384,991 
10,786 
10,268 
4,893 
379,595 
1S2,432 
973.265 



Over thirty-one thousand of the miners employed in the State are 
paid their wages twice a month, and this preponderance is so great 



58 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



as to establish the rule as general, the number who are paid by the 
month being more than offset by the number who get their pay every 
week. The percentages of the foregoing table read as follows: 

Table XXVIII. — Percentages of all Mines, Men and Tons Affected 
by Specified Intervals of Wage Payments by Districts. 



Wages Paid Weekly. 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State 



51,16 

38.58 
26.73 
47.87 
8.86 
18.37 
33.33 



Wages 
Paid Semi-Monthly. 



Wages Paid Monthly. 



4.00 
4.76 

20.32 
0.43 

3.70 



1 
6.47i 

4.381 

4.14 

2C.85; 

0.22, 

0.78: 

2 



47 

52.18 
70.05 
48.94 



77.55 
54.46 



93.52 

80.53 
94.37 
78.761 
99.65 
88.25 
91.92! 



1.16 
9.24 
3.22 
3.19 
1.27 
4.08 
12.21 



5.45 



Men. 



0.03 
10.44 
2.72 
0.68 
0.28 



Tons. 



0.01 
15.09 
1.49 
0.39 
0.13 
10.97 
5.78 



.23 



In brief, 90 per cent of all mine workmen receive their pay semi- 
monthly, 5 per cent are paid monthly, and 5 per cent weekly. The 
semi-monthly payment of wages has been long contended for by 
miners, and is now for the first time substantially accomplished. The 
gradual growth of this practice in the mines of Illinois is exhibited 
in the following table of i^ercentages for a series of years: 



Table XXIX. — Percentages of Mines, Men and Tons Affected by 
Specified Intervcds of Wage Payment for a Series of Years. 



Wages Paid Weekly. 



Wages 
Paid Semi-Monthly. 



Tons. Mines. Men. 



Wages Paid Monthly. 



Men. 



Tons. 



1895. 
1896. 



67 

43 

31 

49 

46.78 

32.23 



27.6 


26..' 


11.7 


9.7 


6.5 


1.2 1 


7.8 


5.3 


6.91 


4.34 


5.36 


4.99 



25 

46 

57 

.37.5 

39.04 

62.32 



56 

66.6 

78.3 

74.6 

74.69 

90.25 



50.4 
67.2 
74.4 
73.5 
73.71 



11 
12 
12 

14.18 
5.45 



16.4 
21.7 
15.2 
17.6 
18.4 
4.3! 



23.4 
23.1 
21.4 
21.2 
21.9 
5.23 



Six years ago about half the men were paid semi-monthly; more 
than a quarter were paid weekly, and less than a quarter, monthly. 
The movement since then has been towards a reduction of both the 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



59 



smaller classes and a corresponding increase in the number paid 
twice a month. For the three years 1895-7, inclusive, there was 
little change, about three-fourths of the men being under semi- 
monthly pay and twice as many under monthly as under weekly pay. 
But here again the impress of the recent strike is discerned, and for 
the year 189S the percentage is raised from 75 to 90. It is observed 
that the percentage of men paid every week has diminished during 
these years as well as that of those paid monthly. This is explained 
by the fact that it was at first attempted to establish weekly pay- 
ments by law, and this was so far successful that in 1893, 27.6 per cent 
of employes received pay each week. Subsequently the semi-monthly 
pay was agreed upon by employers and men as a compromise between 
the weekly and monthly intervals, and, as a consequence, the shorter 
interval was in some cases lengthened, and the longer was shortened 
to the common semi-monthly period. 

Machine Mining. 
Inquiries relating to the extent to which machines have been used 
in mines during the year have resulted in the accumulation of the 
following facts for the several districts and the State: 

Table XXX. — Number and Tonnage of Mininci Machines, hij 

Districts. 





Mines in Which Machines Are Used. 


District. 


EXCLUSIVELY. 


IN PART. 


TOTAL. 




Mines. 


Ma- 
chines. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Ma- 
chines. 


Tons. 


Mines. 


Ma- 
chines. 


Tons. 


First 








2 
1 
1 
6 
4 
2 
5 


17 
2 
2 

52 

10 
31 


65, 122 
10,825 
10.412 
487, 508 
207,686 
137, 500 
356, 245 


2 
2 

1 
7 

15 
18 
10 


17 
8 
2 
56 
133 
123 
53 


65, 122 






6 


77,119 


87, 944 


Third 


10,412 


Fourth 


11 
16 
5 


4 

101 
113 
22 


68,094 
846,992 
921,900 
226,232 


555 602 


Fifth 


1,054,678 


Sixth 


1, 059, 400 


Seventh. 


582 477 






The State 


34 


246 


2,140,337 


21 


146 1,275,298 


55 


392 


3.415,635 



There are no mines operated exclusively by machines in the First 
or Third districts, and only one each in the Second and Fourth 
districts, but in the three southern districts there are o2 mines 



60 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



operating 236 machines, which have mined 1,995,124 tons, wholly by 
machines. Twenty-one mines in all districts using machines for part 
of their output are employing 146 machines with a result of 1,275,298 
tons. In all, 392 machines in 55 mines have undercut 8,415,635 
tons. Compared with the year preceding, these figures show an in- 
crease of twelve in the number of mines in which machines are 
installed and an increase of seventy-two in the number of active 
machines. This, however, does not result in any increase in the 
machine outjDut, which is, in fact, less than usual in the same pro- 
portion as the total output is less. But the fact should be noted 
that the general strike was of greatest duration at the principal 
machine mines, and the shortage would doubtless have been greater 
than it is if there had been no increase in the machine plants. 

It is also true that in many cases the new machines have been so 
recently installed that their output could not materially affect the 
total tonnage. At the close of the current year results may fairly be 
expected which will indicate a decided revival of interest in 
mechanical minina;. 



Table XXXI. — Kinds of Machines and the Number of Each 
Use, by Districts. 



District. 


o 


1 




2.3 
: H 

if 


r 
5' 




II 

^ 1 


!X1 

< 

3 


O 

o 
c 

1 


i 


First.. 




9 






8 


1 








17 


Second. 






7 


8 


Third . 










2 

8 

1 


5 




2 


Fourth.. 


20 
90 
55 
23 


7 
27 
52 
12 


2 
3 
6 
5 






17 

1 
8 

3, 


2 
4 


56 


Fifth.. 




8 
4 


133 


Sixth 


123 


Seventh 




5 


53 






20 




The State 


188 


107 


16 


7 


6 


16 


5 


392 







The foregoing is a classification showing the number of each of 
the various types of machines in use, by districts. The Harrison 
machines outnumber all others, as they have for many years; there is' 
however, no increase in their number over that reported for the pre- 
ceding year. The Ingersoll-Sergeant machines have increased from 
88 to 107 in number, and the Sullivan from 4 to 16. These, with the 
Yock and Chouteau, are pick machines, operated by compressed air. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



61 



More noticeable, perhaps, is the interest which has been developed in 
the Link-Belt and Jeffrey machines,- both of which are of the chain- 
cutting type and both impelled by electricity. The number of these 
machines in use has increased five-fold during the year, and their 
reported efficiency gives promise of much future usefulness. 

Following is a list of the mines in which machines are used ex- 
clusively, showing the number and kind of machines used and the 
number of tons undercut. This is followed by a corresponding list 
of the mines in which a part only of the output is mined by ma- 
chines. 



Mines in ivhich Machines are Used Exclusively. 



Company. 


Location. 


Machines. 


Tons. 


Newsam Brothers. . 


Kingston . 


f 5 General Electric... 
I 1 Jeffrey 


77, 119 




Westville 


HimrodCoalCo 


4 Sullivan 


68,094 

4,893 

180, 000 

77,873 






1 Ingersoll-Sergeant.. 
14 Harrison 


Taylorville Coal Co 


Taylorville 






10 


No.8 


Mt. Olive 




No. 10 




14 " . 


118,579 




Gilles'.ie 


10 




7 " 






Girard 


9 Ingersoll-Sergeant.. 
16 
1 Harrison. 


88,971 


Madison Coal Co No 3 


Mt. 01i\'e. 


139 817 


William Neil & Co 


Bunker Hill... 


6 046 


Raymond Mining Co 

Sorento Prosp. & Mining Co 




(■ 1 Sullivan 


4.000 




1 1 Ingersoll-Sergeant.. 

7 




92, 754 


Abbey, No. 3. 
■' '• Heintz Bluff 


Collinsville. 


10 


9"^ 379 




8 


66 327 






5 " . 


17,410 




Glen Carbon 


15 Ingrrsoll-Sergeant. . 

8 
12 

3 Harrison. 


130, 284 


No. 3 




28, 908 


No 4 


Glen Carbon 


86 216 


Con Coal Co Richland 


Belleville 


8,481 


" " Schureman 




/ 1 Ingersoll-Sergeant.. 


41,372 




.. 


5 " 


38,541 






5 


47 368 


Rose Hill 




3 


26, 145 




.. 


4 Ingersoll-Sergeant.. 

5 Chouteau 


51,367 


Glendale Coal Co 




74.058 



82 STATISTICS OF LABOE. 

Mines in which Machines are Used Exclusivehj — Concluded. 



Company. 


Location. 


Machines. 


Tons. 


Lebanon Coal Mining Ass'n 


Lebanon 


6 Yoek 

3 Ingersoll-Sergeant. . 
5 Yock 


37, 449 
35.G15 


" " No 3 




69 043 


No 4 




5 Ingersoll-Sergeant.. 
4 Harrison. 


88 857 


Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. No. 6. . . 
Ohio & Miss. V'y C. & M. Co. No. 2. 




14,217 


Marion 


5 .Jeffrey. 


18, 500 


246 machines. 






2,140,337 







Mines in Which Only Part of the Output is Cut by Machines. 



Company. 


Location. 


Machines. 


Tons. 




Gardner 

St-reator 

Reed City 

Dunfermline... 
Athens 


9 IngersoU-Sergeant 
8 Link-Beit.. 


6,022 


Chicago, Wilm. & Verm. Coal Co. No. 2.... 


59, 100 


2 General Electric... 
2 Sullivan.. . . 


10.825 


Whitebreast Fuel Co Mine C 


10.412 


AtVipn« Minin<yCo 


7 Ingersoll-Sirgeant 
2 Jeffrey 


53, 263 


TCellevville Coal Co No ' 


Westville 

Glenburn 

Westville 

Staunton 

Virden 


43 234 






] 




i 9 Harrison 


> 107,512 




{. 2 Yock 




Wf^tvillp r'nni On 


10 .Jeffrey 


135, 124 


J W Ellsworth ifc Co 


11 Harrison 


7.000 




f 5 Jeffrey 


[ 141,375 

} 138,791 

25, 446 




I 2 Morgan-Gardner .. 
f 3 Yock 




Consolidated Coal Co. No. C 






8 Link-Belt 


Hillsboro Coal Co 


Hillsboro 

.\Ioweaqua 

Odin 


4 Morgan-Gardner . . 


9,000 




34, 449 








Odin Coal Co 




1 107,500 
30, 000 


Trenton Coal Lio'ht & Power Co 


Trenton 


5 IngersoU-Sergeant 
11 Harrison 


Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co. No. 5 

Big Muddy Coal & Iron Co., Harrison 

Willis Coal & Mining Co . 


Murphysboro... 

Willisville 

Marion 


189, 396 


8 Harrison 


93, 849 


4 IngersoU-Sergeant 

5 Sullivan 


55,000 


Oliin V<i11pv final Jir O.nkc Cn 


8,000 




Murphysboro. . . 


3 Jeffrey 


10, 000 


Total '1 mines 


146 machines 


1.275,298 











COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



63 



The latter list, embracing 21 mines, is found to be more than twice 
as large as the corresponding list of last year, and to contain more 
than twice as many machines. This list, in effect, represents the 
new territory occupied by the machine men, as there has been only 
one added to the list of the exclusively machine mines during the 
year. 

Consumption of Powder. 
The customary statistics relating to the use of blasting powder in 
mining have again been gathered and are summarized for the year 
in the table herewith: 



Table XXXII — Distribution of Powder to Long- wall and Pillar- 
and-room Mines, by Districts. 



District. 


Tons 
produc'J 
without 
powder. 


Long-wall 
Mines. 


Pi LLAR-AND-ROOM 

Mines. 


All Mines. 




Kegs 


Tons 


Keg-s 


Tons 


Kegs 


Tons 


First 


725, 733 
956,350 
143,086 
445, 554 
19, 142 
7,570 
60 


597 
253 


694, 106 
534, 791 


27,246 
42,952 
21.601 
59,640 
86, 144 
71,757 
69,671 


789, 523 
l,059,96t 

578, 760 
1,996,055 
3,844,148 
3,452.362 
3,159,240 


27.843 
43.205 
21.601 
59.665 
86.244 
71,757 
69,671 


2, 209, 362 


Second 


2 551 110 


Third .. 


721,846 




25 
100 


130,450 
62,400 


2,572,059 


Fifth 


3, 925, 690 


Sixth . 


3 459 932 


Seventh 






3, 159 300 










The State 


2.297,495 


975 


1,421,747 


379,011 


14,880.057 


379,986 


18,599,299 



All the tonnage of the State is here accounted for by way of estab- 
lishing what portions of it are mined with and without explosives. 
Two and a quarter million tons are reduced without any powder. 
These are produced in the long-wall mines where the weight of the 
roof brings down the coal after it is mined, and in many local mines 
where the coal is undercut and forced down with wedges. Nearly a 
million and a half tons are reported, for which the quantity of pow- 
der used was very small. These are from those long-wall mines in 
which powder is used for miscellaneous other purposes than for dis- 
lodging the coal at the face. This leaves the tonnage which is the 
direct result of the use of explosives in the mining process, which is 
all from the so-called pillar-and-room mines. In all, 975 kegs of 
powder were used for miscellaneous purposes during the year, and 



64 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



379,011 kegs for the purpose of blasting the coal itself. The amount 
of coal reduced through this agency was 14,880,057 tons, or 80 per 
cent of the entire output. 

Two systems of mining, or of securing the coal, prevail in pillar- 
and-rooDi mines, by one of which the mineral is undercut before 
blasting, and by the other the coal is blasted from the solid wall 
without undercutting. The latter process naturally requires the 
more poAvder; and, as the miner has to pay for whatever powder he 
uses, involves greater expense to the individual workman. The 
average amount of powder used by the miner in these two kinds of 
mines, and the average number of tons of coal acquired for each keg 
of powder consumed in the two methods of mining, are set forth in 
the three tables following: 

Table XXXIII — Powder Used in Mines Where the Coal is Un- 
dercut Before Blasting. 



District. 


Kegs 
cousumed. 


Miners 
employed. 


Tons 
produced. 


Kegrs 
per man. 


Tons 
per keg:. 


First 


9, 255 
951 


651 

189 


280,534 
111,929 


14.22 
5.05 


30.31 
117.48 


Third 






3,323 
7.903 
12,091 

7,972 


235 
1,509 
1,115 

617 


233,993 
1,274.413 
1,127,640 

700.674 


14.14 
5.23 
10.84 
12.92 


70 11 


piftli 


161.25 


gixth ••• 


93.26 




87.89 






Tlie State 


41, 495 


4,316 


3. 729, 183 


9.61 


89.87 



Table XXXIV — Powder Used in Mines Where the Coal is 
Blasted Withont Undercntting. 



District. 


Kegs 
consumed. 


Miners 
employed. 


Tons 
produced. 


Keg-s 
per man. 


Tons 
per keg-. 


Pii-st 


17. 991 
39,960 
21,601 
37,991 
76.521 

61, 699 


961 
1,326 

894 
1,281 
2,536 
2,298 
2,338 


508,989 

888,039 

578, 760 

978,722 

2,452,498 

2,321.722 

2,458,566 


18.72 
30.14 
24.16 
29.66 
30.17 
25.97 
26.43 


28.29 


Second 

Third 


22.22 
20.79 


Fourth 

Fifth 


25.76 
32.05 


gixth 


38 96 


Seventh 


39.85 


The State 


315,429 


11,634 


10,190,296 


27.11 


32.31 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 65 

Table XXXV—Poivder Used in Mines Where Coal is Bofk 
Blasted from the Solid and Undercut Before Blasting. 





District. 


Kegs 
jconsumed. 


i 
Miners 
employed. 


Tons 1 
produced. 


Kegs 
per man. 


Tons 
per keg. 


St-coml 




1 2 Oil 


95 
868 
160 


60,001' 
7S3,34o! 
117.237 

1)60.578: 


91 ii^l 99 39 


Fourtli 




1 18,326 


21 111 42 74 


Fifth 




1,720 




Total.... 




22.087 


19.67 IS 4<) 













A condensed statement of the foregoing statistics of jjowder and 
tonnage is, that in all, 14,880,057 tons were wrought by the use of 
879,011 kegs of powder. Of these, 3,729,183 tons were mined before 
blasting, and required 41,-49o kegs of powder; 10,190,296 tons were 
blasted from the solid face, requiring 315,-129 kegs, and 960,578 tons, 
requiring 22.087 kegs, were produced in mines where both practices 
are in vogue. In the first class an average of 89.87 tons were ob- 
tained from each keg of powder; in the second, an average of 32.31 
tons per keg, and in the last, an average of 43.49 tons per keg. 

The relative cost of powder to the miners working under these 
two systems is indicated by the average numbe.'of kegs used per 
man as computed in the foregoing tables. The number of men min- 
ing and blasting was 4,316, and tht'ir expenditure of powder was 
equal to 9.61 kegs per man per year: the number blasting from the 
solid was 11,634, and they burned, on the average. 27.11 kegs each 
per year. These averages vary somewhat, though not materially, 
from year to year, and this year are somewhat less than usual. It 
should be said, however, that while the cost of powder to the miner 
is greater per ton of product in the solid blasting method, the manual 
labor involved in that process is considerably less p^r ton than it is 
when the coal is undermined with the pick. That the saving of 
labor in the one case is regarded as quite equivalent to the saving of 
powder in the other, is observed by tlie Tact that it is not often that 
a miner will undercut his coal for what he can save in powder by 
doing so. 

Fatal Accidents in Mines. 
Th(> number of deaths which have occurred during the year as re- 
sults of accidents in and about the mines of the State is 75. which is 
six more tlian the number of lives lost last vear and about the same 



m 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



as the averai;e number for the three years preceding that. The dis" 
tribut.i(3n of these casualties amona; districts, and their relation to the 
number of men eni])loyed and the numbt^r of tons delivered, is found 
in the following table: 



Table XXXYl.— Fatal Casualties, by Districts, i6'.9.s. 



Number NumV)er of 



employes. I .J9"^i?,l 



Number of Nu 
employes tons 



to each 
death. 



mber of 
^ of eoal 
ined to 
h death. 



First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 

The State 



7.377 


2,209,362 


615 ! 


184,114 


6.709 


2, 551, no 


680 


255,110 


1.800 


721,8^6 


450 1 


180,462 


4,030 


2.572,059 


212 ; 


135,-372 


6.093 


3,925,690 


1,219 1 


785,1.38 


4, 6(;2 


3,459,932 


583 I 


432,492 


4,265 


.3,159,300 


251 


1S5,841 



35,026 : 18,599,299 



It will be o))served that there is no correspondence between the 
number of deaths and the number of em])loyes, and none between 
deaths and tons of product, in the several districts. Large numbers 
and large tonnage are found alike in conjunction with ;i high nnd a 
low death rate. In fact, the district is too suniU a unit, and afpords 
too narrow a basis for the formulation of any general ratios between 
the casualties in districts and tlie numbers exposed to them. More- 
over, these deaths are each the result of an accident, usually of a 
moment's inadvertance on the part of the victim, and consequently 
are among the mere chances of life which foUoAv no rule and are gov- 
erned by no law. The conditions under which all miners work are 
hazardous. The law contemplates, and the inspector enforces, the 
removal of those dangers which are preventable, but there are those 
which neither the law nor the inspector can reach. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XXXVII— i^'aia/ Arcidenfs for 16 Years. 



67 



1884 

1885 

1886 

1887 

1888 

1889 

1890 

1891 

1892 

1893 

1SP4 

1895 

1896 

:1897 

1898 

Average 16 years 



Number 
killed. 



Total 
number of 
employes. 



23,939 
25,575 
25,446 
25,846 
26,804 
29,410 
30,076 
28, 574 
32.951 
33, 632 
35,390 
32,635 
31, 962 
33,054 
33, 788 
35, 026 



Number 
of em- 



Number of 
tons of coal 



Total 

Ton^s'of°*' Ploye.sto i produced 
tons of ; „_.,. ,,.^,„ i to each 

life lost. 



co^f'^i^^d.l -f^f« 



12,123,456 

12, 208, 075 

11,834,459 

11,175,241 

12,423,066 

14,328,181 

14,017,298 

15, 274. 727 

15,660,698 

17.062,276 

19,949,564 

17.113,576 I 

17,735,864 | 

19,786,626 

20,072,758 

18.599,299 | 



179.6 

566 

652.4 

497 

654 

534.7 

716.1 

539.1 

549 

580 

513 

453.3 

426.2 

429.2 

489.7 

467 



90,474 
265,393 
303,448 
214,909 
303,002 
260,512 
333, 745 
286,316 
261,012 
313, 372 
289, 124 

236.478 
256, 9f 9 
290, 910 
247,991 



257 



15.585,328 



476.5 



245, 438 



* 69 men drowned by the flooding of the Diamond mine, Braidwood, and 10 men killed by 
an explosion at Coulterville. 

The above is the casualty record of the State for a series of six- 
teen years. Omitting the exceptional year, 1883. it is found that the 
number of deaths per annum has increased during this period from 
46 to 75, or 63 per cent; the number of employes has increased 
from 25,575 to 35,02(), or 37 per cent, while the output has increased 
from 12,208,075 tons to 18,599,299 tons, or 52 per cent. It thus ap- 
pears that in the State at large as well as in districts, and for a term 
of years, as well as for the year, there is no fixed or common relation 
which thf accidental deaths in mining sustain, either to the whole 
number employed or to the tons of product. Throughout the inter- 
val these deaths increase or decrease from year to year regardless 
alike of the number of men or of tons with which they are asso- 
ciated. It can not, therefore, be regarded as a matter of especial sig- 
nificance that the fatalities for this year are rather more in number 
than those of the year preceding. As a matter of conjecture, it 
might have been expected that the number would have been less this 
year than usual, because operations were susiiended altogether in 



68 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



many mint's fur a number of months. On the other hand, the actual' 
days of activity for the year, as a whole, were reduced only from 
185.5 to 174.7, and it is true that the longer a mine stands idle the 
greater the dan,u:er to life and limb when men return to work. The 
influence of the strike, therefore, if observable at all, would be to 
increase, rather than diminish, dangers and deaths. 

Following is an analysis of the deaths of the year by the causes 
which occasioned them: 



Table XXXYlll—Fatal Accidents, hij Causes. 1S9S. w'dh Toi<ds 
and Averages for Nine Years. 





1 
H 


District. 


1 

a- 

1 


Cause. 


V. 


Second. 

Third. 

Fonrtli. 

Fifth. 

Sixth. 


a 
1 


Ca*^es 


1 
1 
3 


1 




! 1 J 




1.35 






■■'! 


1 


1 

1 

7 




1 35- 




1 

8 



1 


1 
5 
1 






1 


4 05 




43 
4 
1 


1 


15 


J , 


58 1 


Falling down shaft 


1 1 i 2 


5.4 
1 35 




1 
1 








' 


1 




1 35 


Fan on surface 




1 




i i 


1.35 


1 
1 




, ! 


2 7 




7 

5 

1 
1 
75 

77 
75 
72 


' 




1 




5 


q iK 












I 




1 
1 -1.1 






1 
1 


1 








2.7 




2 


1 

1 1 


1 


5.68- 




1 





1.35 














1 


1.35 


Totals, 1898 

1897 

1896 











12 
11 
18 
16 
19 
17 
10 
15 
16 
134 
14.9 


10 
9 
11 

9 


4 j 19 
4 j 10 

4 : 14 

16 1 15 
10 19 


19 
16 
16 
l.'S 


8 
11 


17 
5 
10 


100.00 


1895 

1894 








1893 


57 
GO 
53 


5 i 12 10 1 "^T 






1890 


1 11 ; 24 


11 
20 
11 






1891 




i 


1890 


5 
66 
7.3 


10 11 

80 134 
8.9 14.9 




j 








607 
67.4 


138 
15.3 


23 


32 




10.7 















COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



69 



The foregoing statement distributes the deaths by the nature of 
the accidents which led to them, and chiefly shows the great pre- 
ponderance of deaths which come from the falling of rock and coal 
upon the working miner. This is the peril fnmi which he can never 
escape, and against which he is ahvays watchfully, but not always 
successfully, on guard. Another feature of the table is the distribu- 
tion, by districts, of the fatal casualties of nine successive years. 

Table XXXIX — Fatal Accidents for Eleven Years by Leading 

Causes. 



'Blasts, explosions, etc. 
•Cages 



Coal and other things falling down 
shaft 



Falling down shaft 

Falling coal and rock, etc. 

'Falling props, etc 

Fire-damp and gas 

Pit-car* 

Railroad cars 

■ Other causes 



3, 4 
i 4 



5! 

48 43! 
2.... 
3 ....[ 
6 2 6 
1 1 2i 



4 


6i 


38 


4l! 


1 


i; 


5 


2! 


5 


^1 


1 


il 


4 


si 


75 


^1 



88 12.5 

41i 5.82 

i 

5' 0.7 

I 

42: 6 

415| 58.8 

10! 1.42 

30' 4.26 

45] 6.4 

12! 1.7 

I7J 2.4 

7041100.00 



This is an analysis of all the deaths for a series of years by the 
causes which have led to them, and the noteworthy observations are 
that 58.8 per cent of all the deaths which have occurred about mines 
in eleven years were occasioned by the fall of mineral upon the miner 
while at work, and that only 4. 2() per cent of deaths was caused by 
ifire-damp or other gases. Although in general our mines are free 
from dangerous accumulations of gas, there are some localities in 
which fire-damp affords a constant menace, reciuiring the utmost 
caution on the part of mine managers and men. In such a place, in 
Williamson county, four men were instantly killed and two others 
seriously injured by an explosion of fire-damp during the year, and, 
in all, seven deaths caused by gas are here reported. This is a 



70 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



greater number of deaths from this cause than lias occurred in any 
year since 1S83, when ten men were killed by an explosion of fire- 
damp and dust at Coulterville. Yet, in the eleven years civered by 
this table, only 30 deaths out ol 704 have been occasioned liy gases 
of any kind, while 414 have resulted from falling material. 

Table XL. — Percentages of Fated Accideiits Caused hy Falling 
Roof or Sides, for 10 Years, hy Districts. 



The State. 



First. Second. 



Third. 



It'll 
Fourth. Fifth. Sixth. 'Seventh.! ^^otal^^ | Pe^r_ 



8.9 
27.3 
60 
64.3 

84.2 
57.1 

i>3.S 

66.7 

80 

88.2 

68.4 

50 

77.8 

72.7 

66.7 



82.4 
66.7 

45.5 

60 

50 

50 

80 

44.4 

45.5 

66.6 

50 

43.75 

75 

75 



' i 
67 

,1 i 



100 
72.7 
50 



50 
40 
41.2 



43.8 



30 

5C.5 

51.3 







41 




55 


60 


42 


62 


53 


67.9 


60 


55 


57 


49.1 


69 


69.6 


72 


58.3 


75 


50.7 


77 


53.3 


69 


66.7 


75 


58.1 



Here is the record for sixteen years of the percentages of all deaths 
which have befallen miners in this State from falling rock or coal in 
each of the several districts. These percentages fluctuate variously, 
botli for years and districts, with the common resultant of 55.5 per 
cent of all deaths occasioned by falls. 

The occupation and conjugal relation of all the killed are shown, 
in the following table: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



71 



Table XLl.— Occupation and Conjugal delation of Killed. 



Districts and Number of 
Fatal Casualties in Each. 



Occupation. 



Drivers j 

Engineers : 

Laborers < 

Loaders j 

Machine helpers | 

Miners ^ 

Picker j ^ 

Pump man i — 

Road man I ^ 

Tirabermen j • ■ ■ • 

Topmen 1 — 

Trip rider ; •••• 

Totals I 1' 



\ '! 



Conjugal Re- 
lation. 



■|- 



-5 !-£» 



27 
1 9 5 

I 
& 

2| 10 9 
l| 3 4 
44 115 14a 



More than lialf the killed are naturally found to have been miners 
proper, as distinguished from other mine workers, as it is the miner 
who is chietiy exposed to the falling roof and the perils of the blast- 
ing process, through which two agencies 71.3 per cent of all deaths 
are brought about. 

Of the killed. 31 are found to have been unmarried, and U were 
married men: the latter left 44 widows and 115 children. Some of 
these were self-supporting, but some of the single men also had de- 
pendent relatives, and the whole number dependent upon all the 
deceased was 143. Last year, although the number of killed was 
somewhat less, those dependent upon them numbered 177. 

This subject is closed with the following table, covering the essen- 
tial details for each district for all the years in which statistics have 
been gathered: 



72 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table XLII — Fatal Accidents from Falls in Mines cmd from 
Other Causes, icith Averages and Percentages for 16 Years. 





District. 


1^ 

P 


u 

i 
£ 






First. 


Second 


Third. 1 Fourth. 

1 


Fifth. ] Sixth. 


Sev- 
enth. 


5 




1 


i 


1 


^i 1 





"5 
fa 


Other 
cause.s. 

Falls. 


Jl . 


li 


2 


li 



1 




7 72 


1 


3 

2 
4 


13 ! 5 11 5' 8 

8 4! 1 !^' 6 


12 
2 
4 

. 

7 
3 
4 
9 
5 










i 
40] 94 

29 17 


134 


Af&l 










46 


^^* 1 1 " r 

1885 \ p.' a. \ 


2 4 

5 6 


! 

9 1 41 S 










20' 19 


39 




loj , 

16, 3 
«| 6 
15) 1 
10 5 
8 ■' 


2 

1 
3 
5 

4 
5 


, i , 


7 

10 
6 

8 










32j 20| 52 


1887 


3 1 2| 2 i 1 
5 1 5 5 1 3 
% '\ 3 fi '> 


1 






931 is'i 11 


1 






33 
26 
36 
33 
28 
48 
43 
38 
41 
46 
43 


22 55 




} 






16 42 




4 8 ! oi .. i J 7 


i 






17 53 


1891 

18^' 


2 

2 

4 
5 

7 
5 
5 


4 5 ! 6 

5 6 8 ! 16 


': 

le 
10 

9 
3 
11 
3 










27 60 










29i 57 




151 2 

13 6 
8 8 

14 4 

; 81 3 

i 81 4 


I 1 
8 4 6 

5 5 10 

7 1 9 7 

3 ! 1! 8 


4 

9 
8 
fi 


9 
5 
7 
13 










21 

29 


69 












72 




.... 

i 






37' 75 


1896 


4 I 


5 
2 

7 

14 


5 
3 
10 

18 


36 77 


1897 

1898 


3 1 1 10 .... 
1 1 3 15 1 4 


8 Is J3 
J_M_4_ 
99 |l6 7 


23 69 

32 75 


16 years....! 16l! 134 !46 49 83 j 65 1 120 j 80 


124 


564 452 1.016 


Averagres lOj 8.4' 2.9 


ill II II 
3 5.2 4; 7.5 5 7.7j 6.3 5.3 


2.3 


4.6 


6 135.228.3 


63.5 


Percentagres .. 


1 
54.6 


45.4 


48.4 


51.656 44 

1 1 


60 


4o! 55.6 

1 


1 1 
44.469.630.4 


43.8J56.2 


55.544.5 





Non-Fatal Accidents. 
The inspector.s are required to gather, not only statistics of the ac- 
cidental deaths about mines, but also the facts in regard to injuries 
received which were less than fatal. Injuries which have caused less 
than a week's loss of time are not considered. The following table 
for injuries shows the number of injured in each district, likewise 
the relation which they sustain numerically to all employes and all 
tons of product: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



73 



Table XLIII— Nov -Fatal Accidents, hu Districts, 1898. 



District. 


Number of 

men 

injured. 


Number 
employes. 


Number of 

ton.s of 
coal mined. 


Number of 

employes to 

one man 

injured. 


Number of 

tons mined 

to one man 

injured 


First. 


108 
60 
12 

92 

48 


7,377 
6.799 
l.SOO 
4,030 
6,093 
4,662 
4,265 


2.209,362 
2,551,110 
721,846 
2,572,059 
3.925.690 
. 3, 459, 932 
3,159.300 


72 
113 
150 

44 

127 
62 
89 


21.450 
42.519 
60. 154 
27.597 


Second 

Third 

i^urth 

Fifth 


Sixth 

Seventh 


75 

48 


46.132 
65.819 


The State 


438 


35,026 


18,599,299 


80 1 42 464 







The whole number of injured, as reported above, is 438. which is 
less than the number reported for any one of the four years prece- 
ding. The facts for non-fatal accidents for all years are as follows: 

Table XLIV — Non-Fatal Accidents for Sixteen Years. 



Number of 
I injured, employes. I coal mined. ^°f„?it" 



iNumberof] Total j Total number!, 
men jnumber of of tons of 



Number of tons 
of coal pro- 
duced to one 
man injured. 



Averages, 16 years . . 



231 

197 
176 
171 
180 
179 
201 
294 
367 
370 
403 
521 
605 
672 
518 
438 



23,939 
25, 575 
25,446 
25.846 
26.804 
29,410 
30,076 
28,574 
32,951 
33,632 
35,390 
32,635 
31.962 
33. 054 
33.788 
35.026 



,256 



12. 123. 
12.208. 
11.834. 
11. 175. 
12,423, 
14,328, 
14.017. 
15, 274, 
15,660. 
17,062, 
19,949, 
17,113, 
17. 735. 
19. 786, 
20.072, 
18,599, 



15,585.323 



52,482 

61,970 
67.241 
66, 126 
69,017 
80,046 
69,738 
51,955 
42,672 
46,114 
49.503 
32,848 
29,313 
29,444 
38.751 
42,464 



45,150 



The statistics of the injured can not be collected with as much 
certainty or accuracy as those for the killed for the reason that loss 



74 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



of life is always made a matter of official notice, while the record of 
minor injuries is often imperfect and sometimes neglected altogether. 
The inspector can not do otherwise than accept hearsay evidence in 
a great many cases, and as a consequence it is quite possible that 
the record is in some measure incomplete every year and in every 
district. But this has always been true and probably more so in 
former years than in more recent ones. 

Computed in percentages, it is found that the persons reported in- 
jured for this year are equal to 1.25 per cent of all the employes of 
the year, while the average number of injured per annum for sixteen 
years is equal to 1.14 per cent of the average number annually em- 
ployed. Thus, by embracing a term of years in the comparison some 
wide numerical differences are neutralized, and the accidental in- 
juries for the year assume what may be considered normal propor- 
tions. 

x\n analysis of the injured by occupation gives the following 
results: 

Table XLV — Xon-Fafal Accidents hy Occupation and Districts, 
(oith Tot<ds and Percentages. 



Occupation. 



District. 



First Second! Third :Fourth! Fifth Sixth 



Sev- 
enth 



Totals 



Per- 

eent- 
ases 











\ 


"1 
2 






31 2 

ii; 7 


1 

li 


1 
10 


1| 


31 




si 23' 81 


Engineers 


1 


i 




1 






1 












1 




! 




1 

5 
2 

1 
1 
42 


3 

: 

1 


6 

10 

1 


1 









9 

2i 
2 








Machine runner's. 


•> 




.... 


Mine managers 


1 


S 


80 : 49 


27 


20! 


Operators 


\ 1 1 




1 










1 








Roadmen 


2! 1 


9 




1 


2 



0.48 
3.14 
16.43 
0.48 
0.48 
0.24 
2.42 
C.53 
1.45 
1.93 
0.72 
59.9 
0.24 
0.48 
0.24 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Table XiF— Conduded. 



Occupation. 


District. 


Totals 


Per- 


First 


Second 


Third 


Fourth 


Fifth 


Sixth 


Sev- 
enth 


ages 






• 




1 






1 
5 
3 
3 


0.24 




1 






4 


' 


1.21 








1 
1 
24 


1 


i 


0.73 








1 


2 


0.73 










! 
1 






















103 


60 


12 


92 j 48 


4 


48 


438 


100.00 



Naturally, the miners are those most frequently hurt, as they are 
especially exposed and are by far the most numerous emi)loyes in 
any mine; next to them are the drivers, and after them the loaders. 
These three classes contribute 82.86 per cent to the total of injured. 
Among the hurt in this year's list are three mine managers, a class 
which, owing to the responsibilities of the position, is quite as much 
exposed to injury as any about the mine. 



Table XLVI- 



-Conjugcd Relation of the Injured ami tht 
Lost from Injuries. 



Time 



District. 


Total. 


Married. 


Single. 


1 

Chil- i Depend- 
dren. ents- 


No. of 
men re- 
ported as 
losing 

time. 


Total 

days 
lost. 


Average 
days lost 
per man. 


First 


103 
60 
12 

*92 
48 
75 
48 


32 
8 
36 
17 
44 
31 


37 
28 
4 


199 
90 

20 


253! 98 


3,433 
2.810 
439 
2,988 
1,351 
2,547 
1,0.31 


35 


Second 


121 


57 


49 


Third . 


23 
134 

59 
115 


12 

67 
39 
72 


37 


Fourth 


! 

32! 101 


45 


Fifth 


31 
31 
17 


44 

77 
17 


35 


Sixth 


35 


Seventh 


90 42 








The State.... 


438 


234 


180 


548 795 


387 


14.599 


38 



*24 men not reported as to marriage relations, dependents or time lost. 

In this table the details of circumstance are not reported for 24 of 
the men injured in the Fourth district, but for the remainder the con- 
jugal relation and number of dependents are stated. Tlie number 
of married men injured is somewhat greater than that of the unmar- 
ried: among the killed the number of married men was also the 
greater, and in about the same ratio, which indicates simply that 
more of the employes are married. 



76 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



In the matter of time lost as a result of injuries sustained, it is 
often difficult, and sometimes impossible, to arrive at the facts. The 
more seriously injured are often sent away to hospitals or friends for 
treatment, and thus are lost sight of; others are frequently shifting 
their location, and still others have not recovered at the end of the 
year when the record is made up. For this reason the number for 
whom the duration of disability is given is always less than the num- 
ber injured, and this year that number is 387 out of a total of 438. 
For these the average number of days lost to each, by reason of in- 
juries received, was 38. Last year 459 injured men lost, on an aver- 
age. 37 days each, and for a series of years preceding that the average 
ranges from 34 to 44 days. 



Table XLVII. — Causes of No7i-Fatal Accidents, by Districts. 





District. 


The 
State. 




Cause. 


s 


■6 

o 

1 




Fourth. 
Fifth. 


Sixth. 
Seventh. 


Per- 
eentagres 


Cages 1 


1 
3 


1 


. 


3' 2 


1 


9! 2 17 








1 


4 

4 
252 


0.97 










4 
22 


0.97 




83 


44 


7 


40 


30 

1 


26 

1 
2 


60 87 


Falling timber 


3 


5 1 21 












1 
1 


2 


8 
2 
84 
11 


1.21 











i 
1^ 3 


1.93 










0.48 


Pit-cars. 


13 


9 


2 


13 


Q 


26 

1!? 




4 


20 29 


Premature blasts 


- 

4! 3 

6 4 


2 66 


l^Iiscellaneous 


4 




2 


2! 30 


7.24 


Not reported.. 


24 






24 




















103 


e. 


12 


92 48| 73J 48 438 


100.00 



In the foregoing table of causes the falling of material in mines 
again api)ears as the occasion of the greatest number of accidents, and 
the percentage is even higher than that for the killed. Accidents 
arising from the handling of pit-cars are next in number and consti- 
tute one-fifth of the whole number. This is always a fruitful source 
of injury, and the percentage here shown is not excessive. 

The proportion of non-fatal injuries caused by falling rock and coal 
.for a series of years is shown herewith: 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



77; 



Table XLVIII. — Percenfrujes of Xon-Faial Accidents Caused hy 
Falliiu} Roof and Sides. 



Non-fatal Accidents. 



Total. 



Falling .„ 



Per cent 
caused \ 
by fall- I 
ins: roof I 
or sifJes.i 



Non-fatal Accidents. 



Falling 
roof 
and 
sides. 



All 
other 
causes. 



Per cent 
caused 
by fall- 
ing roof 
or sides. 



1898 
1897 
1896 
1895 
1804 
1893 



438i 


252 


. 186 


CO. 87 


J1890 1 


518: 


310 


208 


59.85 1SS9 


fu?:> 


373 


?99 


55.51 


il888 


605 


338 


267 


55.87 


■1887 i 


521 


294 
254 


227 
149 


50.43 
63.03 


11886 


403' 


\'^' : 


370j 


234 


130 


63.25 


i'^ i 


367 


227 


140 


61.85 


l'.8S3 ! 



294 


>». 


201 


129 


179 


112 


ISO 


124 


171 


109 


176 


118 


197 


135 


231 


130 



98 


66.66 


72 


64.17 


67 


62 58 


56 


6S.8S 


62 


63.74 


58 


67.00 


62 


68.53 


101 


56.28 



A further combination of both fatal and non-fatal accidents for a 
series of years affords the following table of x3ercentagesof all casual- 
ties which have 'heen occasioned by falls: 

Table XLIX — Percentages of all Accidents Occasioned by Fcdliiuj 
Roof or Sides During Sixteen Years— 1SS3-1S98. 



Yeai 



Killed, i Injured, 



Total. Killed. 



Injured. Total. 



1898 


: 

77 

75 


438 


513 


58.1 

53.3 
50.7 
58.3 
69 6 


60 8" 60 1'^ 


1897 


518 
672 
605 


587 
749 
680 
593 
472 


59.85 1 60.65 
55.51 1 55.27 


1896 


1895 


1894 


72 521 
69 403 
57 1 370 


56.43 ! 56.82 
63.03 1 63.98 
63.25 i 61.36 
61.85 60.88 


1893 


1892 


427 




1891 


1 
60 I 367 


427 


55.0 


1890 


53 } 204 i 347 
42 201 1 243 
55 179 234 
41 180 1 221 
52 171 223 

39 176 215 

40 197 243 
134 231 1 365 


1889 


61.9 64.17 63.78 
60.0 62.58 I 61.97 
68.3 1 68. f« j 68.77 
61.5 63.74 63.23 
51.3 67.00 j 64.18 
56 5 1 >^^ '^'^ ' 'iK "'^ 


1888 


1887 


1S86 


1885 . .. 


1884 


1883 


30 


56.28 1 47.7 


16 years 


1,016 , 5.523 1 6,539 


55.5 


60.38 1 59.61 



78 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 



A j&nal showing of the percentages of increase and decrease, both 
of employes and tons, and of killed and injured, from year to year, 
since this office was established, is made in the following statement: 

Table L— Percentages of Increase and Decrease from Year to 
Year of Men EmplojjeiL Tons Produced, Men Killed and Men 
Injured. 



Year. 


Men Employed. 


Tons Produced 


IClLLED. 


In.jured. 


lucrease 


D'crease 


Increase 


D'crease 


Increase 


D'crease 


Increase 


D'crease 


1883 to 1884 


G.83 




0.7 







65.67 
15.22 




14.72 


1885 


0.5 


3.06 
5.57 






10 66 




1.57 
3.71 
9.72 
2.26 




33.33 




2.84 


1S87 




11.17 
15.34 


21.15 



5.26 




ISSS 






34.15 


0.56 






2.17 


23.64 


12.29 
46.27 
24.83 
0.82 

8.92 
29.28 
16.12 
11.07 




ISOO 


5.00 


8.97 
2.53 
8.95 
16.92 




26.2 
13.2 






15.31 
2.07 
5.23 














5.00 




1893 






21.05 
4.35 
4.17 
2.67 




1891 


7.78 


14.22 






1895 





2 06 


«4 
11.56 
1.45 






189G 


3.42 
3.66 










1897 






10.4 


8.04 






7.34 


■ 8.7 




15.44 



















Conclusion. 

The foregoing survey and analysis of the statistics of the State 
for the year is closed with a general table which is a recapitulation 
of the leading totals for each district and the State. 

Following this table will be found the text and tables of the re- 
ports of the several State inspectors in their order, and in them will 
be found all the detail concerning individual mines and county 
groups of mines which has here been given to the district groups and 
the State. 

This section is followed by an appendix containing the registers of 
certificated mine managers, hoisting engineers and tirebosses, together 
with a financial statement of the fees charged and collected for mine 
inspection. 



80 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Sf(iiif<fi('S of Coal Mining in 

RECAPITULATIOX 





. 




Mine 


5. 




Products. 








o 






-:; 




o 




>.bt 




.i 


«• 




5 




X 




H 


"^ 








~ 


s 


■'. 






a 


•o 


§ 


tSi 






District. 


o 










^ 


g 


a 


■-, 


rs 








Zt 




■i 


■c 






^ 


& 


o 




I 


^ 


= i^s 


.| 




5 


i 


o 

=t4 


"i 


5o» 




'- 




S i 


> 


5 


"a 


= 




c 
















o 


c 










'^ 


2 


X ; S 


^ 


<< 


E-i 




H 


H 


w-s 


First 


5 

8 


86 
184 


39j 47 

48| 130 


11 


27 


2,209,362 
2,551,110 


1,716,685 
2,080,702 


492, 677 
470, 408 


1.759.512 
2.113,432 


5,121,710 


Second 


5, 908, 740 


Third 


10 
5 
10 
52 


217 

94 

79 
98 
123 

881 


2lj 196 
39 55 

51 ! 28 
72| 26 
59 04 


64 
2 

8 
1 


32 
3 

8 

. 

8 


721,846 
2.572,059 
3.925.690 
3,459,932 
3.159,300 


590,299 
2, 178. 132 
2,718,175 
2,713,399 
2,211.403 


131,547 
393, 927 
1.207,515 
746,533 
947,897 


549, 799 
1.989,896 
3,366.367 
3,021,521 
2,796,361 


1.272,500 


Fourth 


5,633,425 


Fifth 


9,537,550 


Sixth. 


7,180,900 


Seventh 


6,428,100 


Totals 


329 j 552 


120 


92!l8,599,299jl4,208,795 

i .. __..__ 


4, 390, 504 15, 596. 888 41, 082, 925 




■■•■r'T"'T'"i'""i""i 1 " ■ 1 1 1 



Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 853. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 120. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 92. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 881. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



81 



the State of Illinois, 1808. 

BY DISTRICTS. 



Values. 


EMPLOyE.S. 


o 
> 

-a 
o 

as 

«a 
1? 

<^ 


is 

a 

o 

|i 


Ca-sual- 

TIES. 


Wa 


GES. 


Machines. 


T^ a 


Agrgres-ate value of 
total product. 


Number of miners. 

Number of other em- 
ployees. 


o 
"a 

1 


W 


3 


g 
> 


a 


Average price 

paid per 

gros.s ton. 


m 

oi a a 


2 




•a 
a 
J hi 

£3 


_a 

It 

a 
5h - 


a 
a 


SI. 1045 


$2,024,429 


5,935 1,442 


7,377 


163.3 


27,843 12 


lOS 


8 


29 


$0,603 


80.37 


2,1 17 


65, 122 


1.16 


2,609,696 


5,336 


1,463 


6.799 


161.3 


43,205 10 


00 


8 


17 


t .585 


.27 


2] 8 


87, 944 


1.108 


708,691 


1,502 


298 


1,800 


135.4 


21,601 


4 


12 


3 


2 


* .834 


.31 


1 2 


10.412 


.9005 


2,136,629 


2.921 


1,109 


4,030 


162.3 


59.665 


19 


92 


11 


22 


.437 


.272 


7 56 


555,602 


.80 


2,576.994 


4,424 


1,669 


6,093 


191.6 


86,244 


5 


48 






.357 


.319 


15! 133jl.054,678 


.746 


2.248,733 


3,445 


1,217 


4,662 


182 


71,757 


8 


75 


7 


20 


.404 


.336 


18 123 


1,059.400 


.868 


2.262,426 


2,957 


1,308 


4.265 


135.9 


69,67117 

379. 986175 


48 


9 


23 


.344 


.304 


lol 53 


582,477 




$14,567,598 


26.520 


8,506 


35,026 




438 46 


113 






55I 392 3.415,035 


SO. 918 









156.8 




1 


:t$0.4409 


SO. 31 37 

















1 


\ 



* Price per screened ton. 

+ Price for mining 310,590 screened tons, 75.2 cents per ton. 

J Average for 14,558.033 grcss ton.s. 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



OF THE SEVERAL 



State Inspectors of Coal Mines 



FIRST INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1898. 

Counties: Grundy, Kankakee, LaSalle, Livingston, Will. 
Hector McAllister, Inspector, Streator, 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Spriyigfield. Illinois: 

Sir: — In compliance with section 12 of the mining law of this State, 1 here- 
with submit the fifteenth annual report of the coal mines in the First Inspec- 
tion District, for the year ending July 1, 1898. This report presents tabu- 
lated statements showing the number of mines in operation, both shipping 
and local; the depth of coal below the surface; the geological number and 
thickness of the various seams; the number of new and abandoned mines, 
with the total number of persons employed at each mine; the number of tons 
of lump coal and of other grades, with the average value of both at the mines; 
the aggregate value of the total product; the number of kegs of powder used: 
the number of fatal and non-fatal accidents; the number of widows and 
orphans, and the number of days of active operation in all mines in the dis- 
trict. 

The following is a summary of the statistics of the year 1898: 

Total number of miues 86 

Number of shipping mines 39 

Number of local mines 47 

Number of new mines 11 

Number of abandoned mines 10 

Number of miners 5,935 

Number of other employes 1, 442 

Total number of employes 7,377 

Number of fatal accidents 12 

Number of non-fatal accidents 103 

Number of wives made widows 8 

Number of children left fatherless 29 

Total tons of coal produced 2, 209, 362 

Tons o f lump 1, 716. 685 

Tons of other grades 492, 677 

Average value per ton of total product at the mine $0,911 

Average value of lump coal per ton $1 . 1045 

Average value of other grades per ton $0,258 

Aggregate value of total product $2, 024, 429 

Average price paid per gross ton for hand mining $).603 

Average price per gross ton for machine mining $).37 

Average number of days of active operation 163.3 

Number of mines operated by hand mining 84 

Mines using machines 2 

Number of kegs of powder used 27,843 

Tons of coal cut by machines 65, 122 

Number of machines in use 17 

Number of tons of coal shipped 1,759.512 

Tons sold to local trade 280.942 

Tons consumed .at the plant 168,908 

Tons of coal mined to each fatal accident 184,113 

Tons of coal mined to each non-fatal accident 21.450 

Number of employes per fatal accident 615 

>Jumberof employd-s per non-fatal accident 72 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Coal production by counties in the First district, with increase or decrease- 
in each, for the years ending June 30, 1897 and 1898. 





Counties. 


Total Output of all Grades 
of Coal in Tons. 


1 
Increase, i 


Decrease. 




«,. 


1898. 






1.077.576 
180,683 

1,508.833 
145.206 
25,682 


796,219 

84,632 

1,165,490 

122,087 
40,904 


1 


281, 327 




1 


96.051 


LaSalle . . 




343, 343 


Livingston 
Will . 






23,119 




15,2221 










Total... 


2,937.980 


2,209,362 


15,222 


743,840 










I 


743,840 










i 


15, 222 
















728, 618 















This decrease is due to the continuous strike of five and a half months 
duration during the first part of the year. The gain in Will county is due to 
the fact that the miners in this county continued at work nearly full time 
during the strike. 

New Miyies. — LaSalle county. — The Piny Coal Co. of Streator, located on 
the Benekindorf farm, two miles north of Streator, has sunk a new shaft 
about 400 feet south of the old one, and will use the old one for an air shaft. 

S. A. Muntz & Sons have opened a new mine in South Streator, which is 
intended to supply local trade only. 

Love & Sons have opened a new mine two and one half miles north of 
Wilsman. The shaft is 73 feet deep: the machinery at this^time is light and 
intended for local trade only. 

James Plauger, Daniel Verzain and Taylor (!v; Jenningslhave opened new 
mines near Ottawa. 

Livingston county. — C. G. Darni has opened a new mine near Streator. 

A. M. Barackman, of Streator, has opened a new mine at Coalville. 

Edgar Hamilton has opened a new mine at Coalville. 

Kiraes' Cooperative C'oal Co. has opened a new mine near Coalville. 

Abandoned Mines. — LaSalle county.— William Thomas & Co. have aban- 
doned their mine one mile northwest of Streator, at thelEagle Clay Works. 

Price & Jones have abandoned their mine on Prairie Creek, near Streator. 

Sowerby Bros, have abandoned their mine, one mile north of Streator, and 
opened a new one a quarter of a mile south of the old one. 

Livingston county. — John Caswell has abandoned his mine at Coalville. 
Jesse Massy ^ Son have abandoned their mine at South'_Streator. 

Grundy county.— The Wilmington Star Coal Co. has abandoned its No. H 
mine at Coal City. Hai-ry Kay has abandoned hisi[mine near IMorris, and 
opened a new one about four miles north of Morris. 

Grundy county. — Thomas Stott & Son have abandoned their mine near 
Morris. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 87 

Will county. — Robert Crighton has abandoned his mine at Braidwood. 

Fires.— On September 2'2, 1897, the top works of the Carbon Hill mine No. 1, 
belonging to the Star Coal Co., were consumed by fire. The fire occurred 
during the strike; its origin is not known, but it is thought to have been in- 
cendiary. 

Floods. — The mines of the following proprietors were flooded with water 
during the heavy rainfalls in March, 1898, at Streator, in LaSalle county: 
The A. V. Swarthout Coal Co., W. D. Thorn, Joseph Fairbairn and Edward 
Dawson. In Livingston county: Joseph Kllburn, Oscar Kimes, Thos. Ed- 
wards, C. O. Darm, Burrell & Reese and J. Massy & Son. 

Improvcuicnts. —^iWiKm Maltbj', of Braidwood. has put in a shaker screen 
and has also erected an eight-foot fan, which has greatly improved the venti- 
lation. 

The Big 4 Wilmington Coal Co. has put in a shaker screen of its own de- 
sign, which is working very successfully. 

The LaSalle County Carbon Coal Co. has put in at its LaSalle mine a shaker 
screen and erected an elevator and storage hopper for handling screenings, of 
one hundred tons capacity. 

The C. W. & Y. Coal Co.. at Streator, has put in shaker screens at its 
mines Nos. 1 and L'; also at its ""R" shaft at Braidwood. all of which are work- 
ing very successfully. 

The Pontiac Coal Co. has purchased the mine formerly owned by Richard 
Evans & Sons, at Pontiac, Livingston county. This company has completed 
the air and escape shaft, which has put the ventilation of the mine in good 
order, and has increased the safety of the miners and other employes in the 
mine. 

Netr Coinp(tny. — A company of miners has been engaged for six months in 
sinking a shaft at Forrest, Livingston county. The shaft was sunk to the 
depth of 72 feet, when it was abandoned, owing to the difficult nature of the 
ground and the immense quantity of water encountered. The timbers were 
too light for the depth of the shaft, which caused a collapse and the shaft was 
lost. 

The relations between the operators and miners have been harmonious since 
the strike; no stoppage of any kind has occurred in this district, except at a 
few mines where new scales were put in, and this was amicably adjusted. 
The prospect of the coal trade in this district for the coming year is very flat- 
tering for a large output, as all the mines are working nearly full time at this 
date. 

• Fatal Accidrnts. — December 21, 18i)7, Frank Brazina, a miner, came to his 
death by an explosion of gas in the Star Coal Company's mine at Spring Hill, 
LaSalle county. He had just gone in that morning to look for a place, btit 
did not find one to suit him. W. J. Brown, mine manager, told him to go 
home and come back the next morning and he would have a place ready for 
him: but instead of going on toj), he went to the south side into an old aljan- 
doned entry, through a door with a danger signal on it. and over fulls and 
through water two feet deep, with a naked light, when an explosion of g;is 
occurred, killing him inst;uillv. Deceased was 35 vears of age niul siimlc. 



88 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

February 28. 1898, Michael Creshak, a miner, aged 26 years and married, 
bad his back injured by a fall of rock in his room in the No. 1 mine of the 
Chicago, Wilmington & Vermilion Coal Co. at Heenanville, LaSalle county. 
At the time of receiving his injuries he was setting a prop under a bad rock, 
when a portion of it gave way, striking him on the body. He was taken to 
the hospital, where he died June 10, three and a half months after receiving 
his injuries. Deceased leaves a widow and two children. 

March 9, 1898. Christian Aderholdt, a miner, aged 58 years, married, was 
fatally injured in James Cahill's mine, Peru, LaSalle county, by a fall of rock 
at the face of his room, in the first north entry. Deceased and his partner 
had been brushing and were in the act of cleaning the rock away, when, with- 
out any warning, a large rock fell, crushing him on the left side and breaking 
his left leg, and injuring him internally. At the time of the accident it was 
not thought that he was fatally injured, but he died of internal hemorrhage 
about 9 o'clock the same evening. He leaves a widow and five children, three 
dependent. 

Mai'ch 15, 1898, Joseph Diggle, a miner, aged 52 years, married, was severely 
burned by an explosion of powder in the Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Co.\s 
mine, at LaSalle, LaSalle county. Deceased, at the usual time of firing, 10 
a. m., had made two cartridges and filled them with powder, and. being in a 
hurry to get the blasts off in time, had neglected to close the end of the cart- 
ridge, and the supposition is that a spark from his lamp ignited the powder, 
burning him severely about the chest, face and arms. Although the burns 
were painful and extensive, thej' were not considered at the time of a serious 
nature; but he died of his injuries April 2, eighteen days after the accident. 
Deceased leaves a widow and four children, three of whom are dependent. 

March 16, 1898, James Black, a coal picker, aged 60 years and married, was 
caught by the cage and instantly killed, at the No. 2 mine of the Star Coal 
Co., Carbon Hill, Grundy county. It appears from the evidence of the eager, 
William Taylor, that he had belled away an empty cage for the mine manager 
to come down upon, and had turned away to get a car ready for the next cage, 
and did not see deceased on the opposite side of the shaft. It is supposed the 
deceased was reaching over the cage to take off a piece of coal, when the cage 
was taken away suddenlj-. Deceased was taken to the door-head and thrown 
back, breaking his neck. He had been warned several times to keep away 
from the cage. He leaves a widow and nine children, five of whom are 
dependent. 

March 30, 1898, Joseph Cuguatti, a miner, aged 60 years, single, was fatally 
injured at the Big 4 Wilmington Coal Co. 's mineat Coal City, Grundy county. 
Deceased was being hoisted out with five others, and when about thirty-five 
feet from the bottom he fell from the cage to the bottom of the shaft. This 
is a round shaft and there is about eighteen inches of space between the wall 
of the shaft and the platform of the cage from which he fell. Deceased died 
one hour after receiving his injuries. 

April 20, 1898, Thomas Early, a road man, aged .50 years and married, was 
fatally injured by a large piece of rock falling on him while at work in James 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 89 

€aliill's mine at Peru, LaSalle county. Deceased was taking' aown some 
loose rock on the entry, when a piece fell on him, causing injuries from which 
he died four hours after the accident. He leaves a widow. 

May 17, 1898, Arthur Coop, a miner, aged 25 years and married, was fatally 
injured at 7:10 a. m. in the C, W. & V. Coal Co.'s "K" shaft southwest of 
Braidwood, (rrundy county. The accident occurred about ten minutes after 
work commenced in the morning. Deceased and his brother, George Coop, had 
gone to their room, when they observed a dangerous rock near the face of 
their roadway, and determined to secure it before commencing work. De- 
ceased went back on the roadway to get a timber, and as he was coming back, 
and about thirty feet from the face, a mass of rock fell on him, crushing his 
head so that he died three hours after receiving his injuries. He leaves a 
widow and three children, all dependent. 

June 2, 1898, Joseph Feletto, a miner, aged 28 years, single, was fatally 
injured by a fall of rock at the face of his entry in the straight south entry 
in the Diamond No. 4 mine of the Wilmington Mining and Manufacturing 
Co., Grundy county. Deceased was cutting in the brushing along one side 
of the roadway, and had cut from one break to another close to the face, 
which was about three feet apart and within three inches of a smooth in the 
top, when suddenly without any warning a large rock weighing about 3,000 
pounds fell on him, breaking his neck; he died 30 minutes after receiving 
his injuries. This accident was due to the victim's own negligence; with 
one prop in the center of the roadway the accident would have been avoided. 

June 2, 1898, Thomas Ward, a miner, aged 43 years, was instantly killed 
while at work in No. 1 mine of the C, W, & V. Coal Co., at Heenanville, six 
miles south of Streator, LaSalle county. He was loading a car at the time 
when a great mass of rock came down on him. He was working alone and 
was very hard of hearing, and if the roof gave any warning he could not 
hear it. The evidence showed that deceased got an empty car about 2 p. m. 
He asked the men in the next room to give him a push in with the car. Mr. 
Arthur Goslin complied with his request, and stated that the room was well 
propped and there seemed to be no danger at that time. About ten minutes 
later they heard a fall, and going into the room, saw the rock down and gave 
the alarm. I found, on examining the rock, there was a slip running diag- 
onally across the room from the right to the left side, and another one run- 
ning nearly parallel with the room on the right rib at the thick end of the 
rock, and between those two slips the rock fell. Deceased leaves a widow 
and three children, all dependent. 

June 7, 1898, Zathan Fox, a driver, aged 22 years, single, was fatally in- 
jured by a fall of rock in the Braceville Coal Co.'s No. 4 mine at Braceville, 
Grundy county. At the time of receiving his injuries he was going in with 
two cars, the first one being empty, the second loaded with props. On this 
entry there is quite a grade down to the first right turn, in favor of the 
empties. He was sitting on the car of props and going at a good speed, 
when his light went out. The first car ran off the track at the froe-, knock- 
ing out a set of timbers, which let down a large mass of rock and knocked 



90 



STATISTICS OF LABOR, 



him to one side of the car and crushed his head. He was so seriously in- 
jui'ed that he never regained consciousness. He died two and a half hours 
after receiving: his injuries. 

June 10, 1898, John Kirski, a miner, aged 48 years, and married, was in- 
stantly killed at James Cahiirs mine, Peru. LaSalle county, by a fall of rock 
in his room. He was working alone at the time of the accident, and was in 
the act of setting a prop under a bad rock, when the rock, weighing about 
3,000 pounds, fell on him, killing him instantly. Deceased leaves a widow 
and five children, of whom three are dependent. 

Following are the tables of casualties and the county tables showing the 
details of character and output of every mine in the district, and a recapitu- 
lation table for all counties, with summaries for the district, all of which is 
Eespectfully submitted. 

Hector McAllister, 

State Inspector, First District. 
Streator, III. 

Faial Casualties— First District, 1S98. 



Occiipation. 



Residence. 



1897 
Dec. 21 

1898 

Feb. 28 

Mar. 9 

'• 15 

" IG 

" 30 

Apr. 20 

May 17 

June 2 

" 2 



Frank Brazina [35 Miner.. 



Kangley. 



MikeCreshak i26 IStreator .... 

Chri'- Aderholdt i5fe " [Peru 

Joseph Diggle |52 " LaSalle 

JaiuesBlack i60lPickei- Carbon Hill. 1 1 

Joseph Cugnatti ;60 Miner ICoal City... 

Thos. Early 50 Koadnian....!Peru 

Arthur (Joop I25 Minei- 'Braid wood.. 

Joseph Feletto |2S| " ; Diamond.... 

Thos. Ward 'M " [Streator .... 1 li 3 

Zathan Fox 22' Driver Bracevill 

John Kirski !43iMiner iPeru ! 1' 1| 3 



Si^ 



Totals .. ! 1 8, 8:29 4|26 

M I I i I 



Cause of Accident. 



Explos'u of fire-damp 

Palling rock 

Esplos'n loose p'der. 

Ascending cage 

Fell fr'ra ascend. cage 
Falling rock 



Total fatal casualties— It: 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties— First District, 189S. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Braeeville — 
Braidwood.... 
Carbon Hill... 

Coal City 

Diamond 

Kangley 

LaSalle 


1 
3 


Driver 

jMiners 

Picker 


1 

9 

; 


Ascending cage ... 
Explos'n fire-damp 
Exp. loose powder. 
Falling from cage. 
Falling rock 

■ 


1 
1 


Big4 Wilm'tonC. Co. 

Braeeville 

Cahi'l James 


1 

1 
3 


Roituman 


Chi.. W. & V. C. Co.. 

M. ctH. ZincCo 

Star Coal Co 

Wilni'ion M. & M.Co. 


3 

1 
2 

1 


Streator 






12 


12 


12 


1? 













COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



91 



Non-Fatal CasuaJfies— First District— 1898. 



hi 



1^97. 
Aug. 
Sept. 
Oct. 



Nov. 
Dec. 



1S98. 
Jan. 



20; George T. Kerr .. 

10 A. A. Browu 

16 John Wilson 

lOThos. Kelley 

22'Evan Williams... 

27Gus Thoren 

2S Thos Thornton . . 

2! Archie Frew 

29|Thos. Powell 

6:Chas. Mollie 

91 Wm. Fo.K 

10 Mike Poniatti .... 

lllThos. Burns 

13!a. .Schinnuel 

13i Edward Murphy 
131 Alma Lettsome.. 
14!Aug. Bambesaro 
141 James Alroyd... 

14; Joe Branco 

ISiPeter Bednarsh. 
20iGeorge Bell 

21 John Shallow.... 

22 John V'ernou — 
22 Joseph Dermee. 
23J0S. Slice 



:28IFairoury — 
42i 

;4S,Gardner .... 
. . Fairbury.... 
10 
!.35'Clark City.. 

i30,Streator 

j35!Clark City.. 
144! Fairbury — 
|40jBraidwood.. 
j41;Braceville .. 
l36:Coal City... 

i30Oglesby 

i50 Diamond 

!27 Carbon Hill 
124' 

■40:CoalCity ... 
'22iBraceYille .. 

;40 Diamond 

:48 I'eru 



Streator — 

.150, Peru 

. i21iStreator.... 

.'40iLaSalIe 

.38! Braid wood. 



3'Mart. Maddellino.,32:Coal City .. 



6 Mike :Menamara. . !20| Braidwood, 

6 Wm. Davidson... i35]Streator 

7 Joe Swansburo...i38| Braidwood,. 

10 Albert Verhey. . . i22;Diam()nd, 

11 Caponi Foustone.j35 C. B. Junc'n 

13 John Tracy 130 Diamond.. 

14 Geo. Peters |32 Streator. . . 

14 W. Babbington...!21 Braidwood 

17 Jehn Grogan 154 Streator 

19 Thos. Watts |16lCarbon Hill. 

19 Jos. Pomotto 155! Braidwood.. 

22 H Perry i65 Carbon Hill. 

24 P. Gatemia '33l 

26|Geo. Olingrer !43jCoalville.... 

28 Jos. Jacover |24 Braidwood.. 

IF. Modrjanski 35| LaSalle 

l' Levi Myers 50| Oglesby 

11 Henry Brown 28; Braidwood. . 

4lVVm. Suddish....l3G'Carbon Hill. 
HT. McCuin 4lj 

12 Pat Blaske '54 LaSalle, 

19' Wm. Anderson... |17 

22|Wm. Robnett |38 

24IM. Screvonis !21 

24iJ. Button 130 

24 J. Bolen |18 

25 G. R. Smith 140 Peru. 

:;8 L. Barls 23 Carbon Hill. ! . 

. 1 L. E.Denny i31 

4 Jos. Rule 37 

4 Henry Guy 19 

4 Aug. Greever 19 

4 John Cooper 58[ 

5 Jlodesta Leone... 34i Diamond 
SiChas. Huber. 



Braidwood. 

Rutland 

Carbon Hill 



hlMike Barra 38 

11 Fred Berge 46 

14; John Dillon 2i 

Adam Pooley 45 

Andrew Ductk 



Coal City... 

Streator 

LaSalle..... 
Braidwood.. 
Heenanville 



Robert Robertson llDiamond.. .. ! 

Clias. McLean 35 Braidwood.. 

Jos. Milb-v 2filCarbon Hill 

George Mfiore 5U' Braidwood.. ^ 



Character of In.jury. 



Knee crushed 

1 Back injured 

6 5 Side and arm cruslud. 

2 3 Foot injured 

4 SlLeg broken 

' Foot injured 



Ribs broken. 

Foot injured 

Leg broken 

Back injured 

Knee fractured 

Foot injured 

Hand injured 

Leg injured 

Head, back and leg injured . . 
Back and shoulder injured... 

Foot injured 

Ankle injured 

Back injured 

Leg broken 

Hip and collar-bone broken.. 

Thigh injured 

Finger brui.sed 

Leg fractured 

Leg injured 



90 
15 
70 
208 
107 



3 4 

2! 3 

3' 4 

4! 5 



Toe bruised 

Foot injured 

Finger crushed 

Eye injured 

Leg broken 

Leg crushed 

Arm broken 

Head and foot injured. 

Hand bruised 

Head injured 

Body bruised 

Finger crushed 

Arm injured 

Leg injured 



Hand bruised. 
J aw broken... 
Hand injuied 



Foot injured.... 
3iKnee injured... 

6 Leg bniised 

.'Finger crushed 
2|Back injured.... 

Leg injured — 



41 Leg broken. 
. . Back injured 

1 Arm and shoulder crushed.. 
. . Back injured 

4 Foot injured 

. . Leg injured 

1 Leg and hand injured 

..'Finger bruised 

6l Hand injured 

5' Shoulder 'njured 

. . iFoot injured 

7!Leg and hand injured 

. . : Side injured 

5lHand bruised 

..iF'oot crushed 

OlBack and head injured 

4 Back injured 

..|Side bruised 

rLeg injured 



131 
16 

28 
111 



10 
147 
14 

10 
28 

77 
28 
21 
12 
14 
44 
2.S 
42 
10 
90 
10 
40 
18 
12 
10 



92 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Non-Fatal Cas ualties — First District — Concluded. 



Date 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


1 




a 
1 


a 

<v 

I 

Q 


Character of Injury. 





1898. 
April 8 


P. Btn-rello 

Tom Geroat 

Emile Sabola .... 


as 

45 
22 
26 
40 
35 
30 

i 

f5 

18 
40 
20 
25 
24 
51 
40 
28 
35 

i 
'^ 

34 
42 
50 

18 
50 
30 
22 


Kangley .... 
Braidwood.. 

Carbon Hill 
Braceville . . 

LaSalle 

Braidwood.. 

LaSalle 

Braidwood.. 

Diamond ... 
Streator .... 
Oglesby .... 
Braidwood.. 
Carbon Hill 
Og-lesby .... 
Streator .... 
Braidwood.. 
Carbon Hill 

Streator .... 

LaSalle..;;;; 

Braceville... 
Braidwood.. 
Streator .... 

Braidwood.; 
Streator 

Coal Br.Jc; 
LaSalle 


1 

1 
1 
1 

.... 

1 
1 


"i 

1 


2 
3 
4 
4 


3 
4 

5 

5 




10 


•• 15 


Foot injured 


42 


" 15 




?8 


" 18! Godfrey Morri.son 


Toes crushed . 


42 


" 21 


Jobn Alderson... 
A. Budrewitih . . . 

Prank Stiff el 

Frank Kocca 

StanT Zura 


Hand crushed 


16 


" 21 


"3 

"i 
"s 


2 

"4 

■■■5 


Leg broken. . . . 


70 


" 23 




46 


" 23 


Leg bruised 


7 


" 26 




H 


'' 27 William Allison. . 


....! i 

.... 1 
i!.... 

....I 1 
1 

....! 1 
1 .... 


Back injured. 


21 


" 291 William Bovd.Jr 




S5 


'' 30 Jake Braugham. . 


Finger iniured 


21 


May 2!Benj. Bashton.... 




?n 


' ' 21 Burt Pascoe 


Leg injured . 


35 


" 3 Prank Hanpa .... 




'>H 


" 10|B. Gabriel 


Body injured 


10 








" 19iMike Bua'iik 


.... 

"i 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
.... 


1 

1 

.... 

"i 

"i 

1 

37 


Head injured. 


42 


" 20Chas. Schroll .... 




?5 


" 21 A. Belzerine 


3 


4 


Leg injured 


14 


" 23|P. Benetone 




10 


" 28!.Tolin Hudella. .. 


3 
6 
2 

1 

3 
6 
4 

""5 
199 


4 
7 
3 
4 
4 
4 

I 

"h 

253 


Leg miured 


18 


" 31iJoP Butcbko 






" 31i.lohn Dauck 


Body injured 


13 


-June l!Mike Pack 


Leg broken 


•^0 


' ' lOjJacob Nobara 


Leg and head injured 


14 


" 13 Shottin Spragin . 


Back and ribs injured 


17 


" 13iSr,pphen Lobo 


Hand bruised 


14 


" isl William Clelland 


Back bruised 


"Jl 


•■ 16 


Mike Retoff 

Stephen Verden. 

Frank Bruchi 

Frank Wagren . . . 






" 17 


Head cut 




" 21 




10 


" 29 


Back and ribs crushed 








66 















Total men injured 

Not yet recovered, July 1, 1898 

Number recovered 

Time lost by men recovered 

Averige time lost per man recovered 



3,433 days 
35 " 



* Not recovered July 1. 1898. 

t Amputated; not at work July 1, 

+ Amputated" 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



93: 



Recapitulation of Xon-Fatat Casualties— First District— .1898. 



Occupation. 



No. 



Braceville | 4 

Braidwood ! 24 

Carbon HilL., 18 

Clark City — j 2 

Coal City 4 

Coal Br. Jc...! 2 

Coalville 1 

Diamond 8 

Fairbury 5 

Gardner 1 

Heeiianville ..; 1 

Kanjjley ; 1 

LaSalle I 8 

Oglesby ! 4 

Peru 3 

Rutland 1 

Streator ; 10 

Totals I 103 



Cagcrs j 3 

Drivers 11 

'Engineers I 1 

IForeman i 1 

Miners [ 80 

[Mach. runners 2 

iPicker 1 

Roadmen 2 

Timberman... 1 

:Top man 1 



Nature of Casualty 



Compressor, lever 

Door 

Palling: coal 

Failing' rock 

Falling timber 

Machine jack 

Pick 

Pit cars 



No. 



Colliery. 



Braceville Coal Co... 
|Big Four Coal Co.... 

iCahill. James 

jCooperative Coal Co. 

C.. W.& V. Coal Co.. 
iGard. & Wilm. C. Co. 

jKimes, Oscar 

I LaSalle Co. Coal Co. 

M. &H. ZincCo 

iOglesby Coal Co 

iOtter Creek Coal Co. 
jRutland Coal Co i 

Star Coal Co I 

Walton Bros I 

I Wilm. M. & Mfg. Co.i 



T((l)te sJiou-iiuj the Xafure of Injjirics. Nnmher of Persons Injured,. 
Dependents. Time Lost, witli Averages and Pei-centanes. —First 
District. 



Nature of Ix.iuries. 



Ankle injured 

Arm broken 

Arm injured 

Arm and shoulder injured 

Back injured 

Body injured 

Eye injured 

Face injured 

Feet injured 

Fingers broken 

Fingers injured 

Hands injured 

Heads injured 

Head and back injured 

Head and foot injured 

Hip and collar hone injured 

Knees injured 

Jaw broken 

Legs broken 

Legs and hands injured 

Legs and head injured 

Legs injured 

Ribs broken 

Shoulder injured 

Side and arms injured 

Toes injured 

- Totals, averages and percentages 




^ Time Lost. 



age 
days. 



56| 

14 
40 
246! 
331 
281 
20; 

560; 
30i 



28 

56 

14 

40 

19 

11 

28 

10 

37.5 

30 

47.4! 

24.1 

r\ 

20 I 
131 I 
69.2 
77 ! 
54.31 
53 

14 I 
32.1! 
30 I 

24. i; 

33.11 
31 



D4 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Grundy Countij— First District— 1898. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 



l! Braceville Coal Co. ... Braceville .... I 
2j Frederick Scbultz . . . . | " — 
3'W. Star M. Co.,No. 3:Coal City \ 

i\ " " No.5 '• : 

5|StarCoalCo.,No. 2...!CarbonHill...! 
-6 " •' No. a... I 

7 C..W. &V. C.Co.,"R" ' 

SiW. C. M. & M.Co 

9 -Big: 4 Wil. Coal Co.... 
10 Gardner & W. C. Co.. 

lll.J. T. Espley 

.12;Charles Heather 

13! A. W. Telfer &Son.. 
.141 Griffith & Wren. 

l5lJame.s Bell 

16! William Wood.. 

17 Harry Kay, No. 3 

18'Frank Gilbririe 

19' Thomas Stott & Son. 
2U: William Laherty 



Totals . 
Averages 



Braid wood... 

Diamond 

Coal City. ... 

Gardner 

Morris 



Sh. 



« ! 

I I Total j rr. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



162,000 130,000i 
600, 600| . 



i::i 



.249 649,912 146 



Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 26. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 7. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 20. 



Kanl-akec Con ntij— First District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 




Description. ! Output. 


1 

:S 

-2 


Postoffice. 


1 

§ 
=1-1 
o 


1 

!l 

II 


Geological number 
of seam. 

Shaft, slope or drift. 

Steam, iiorse or hand 
power. 


1 
o 
a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 1 Gardner & W. C. Co.. 
:2' William Treasure .... 


Gardner 

Essex 


106 
63 


4.8 

2.8 


7iSh. S. B. 
2 " Ho. M. 


82,432 
2,200 


43,086 
2.200 


39,346 






84, 632 


45,286 


39,346 










i 1 








1 


1 1 ! 









Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Gnuidji Coiiitfi/, AS.'AS— Coiicludcd. 



;~ Ai;4jrpsf!ite 

,, ■^ i value 

s 1 I of total 

~. 3 i pi-oduct. 






SI 04 
1 75 
1 04 
1 04 
1 04 
I 04 
1 03.1 
1 04 
1 04 

1 38 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 



Wa.je.s. 




jr- 1 




.i k. 


I'rioe paid 


g^ 


a. 


per sjros.s ton. 


■- 










>i r 
















p 1 •= 






^ti 1 -gii 


- jC 


~ 












.„ ;:•_, 




- 




-:; O 




























-> . -4 


-* 


— 



A.-ci-i 
den's- 



Capacity 
of 

mine— 



$143,200: 

1.0501 

7. 721 1 

22.541 

119.33S)! 

84,0^1 

61,376] 

122.295; 

116, 1271 

15.0061 

7, 479] 

1,6751 

4,752 

2, 150 

2, 456 

3,000i 

1,575; 

5, 515 

2,250 

2, 140' 



522! 
5'. 



69 
410! 

352; 

278i 
450 
406 

31; 

10' 
4 . 



iS-M. 



S725.731 2,026 359 



3, 127j 

i I [81 06.9 



190i . . 
46: 
1201 
136^ 
]36i 
1171.. 
1301 
1281 
155 . . 
254! . . 
175i.. 
275 .. 
2981 . . 
175!.. 
200!.. 
150! . . 
3001 . . 
195 .. 
125i . . 



•I 1 



37i . . i 
67 ..1 
86! 1! 



... 1 

50 1 
11! 1 



300, 000 

1,000 

120.0W 

100, om 

3(;0,0l.HI 

240, 000 

187,200 

260,000 

350,000 

25.000 

18,000 

3,000 

5,000 

1.300 

4,000 

5, 000 

1..500 

3. 000 



....|..|.... 2,000 

3461 si 61 1.98*5,000 



Kdiikdiccr Coil ilfij. IS'JS — Coiicludod. 



1 Values. 


Employes. 




Wages, 




1' 
'■- 1 

1; 

5| 


3 

a; 


0. 

1 


Afci- 
den's 




aa; 


A2'y:reg:ate 

value 

of total 

prorluct. 


\ \l '\i 


ft 
c 


Pricp paid 
per gros.s ton. 


II 

— 2 








■S! 


Capaeity 

mini — 
tons. 


■- B^ 


1 1 aS 

"_: - S 

6'z. 1 -S — 


as i 

ill 

< \ 




«.5 


1 .SI 17 

2 2 00 


$.56. 706 
4,400 

$61, 106 


112i 59: 10' 

6 li 2 

118! 60 12' 


181 
9 

190 


$0 4- j SO 37 
100 

1 


S-_M. 


145I 

1751 


2.040 




2 


200, 00(' 
4.000 

•'(U. ffllO 




2.040 




'f 


Si 21 


i 

$0 48 4' Si> 37 




I60! 


1 


1^ 




1 1 










1 



96 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



LaSalle Count ij— First District— 1808. 











Description. 


Output. 




T 


J. 

8| 


s 

C3 




1 

J5 


i 








c 


Name of Operator, 


Postoffice. 


i 




■^nf 


o 
1 


c 


o 


Total 
tous pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tous 

of 
other 
grades 


x: 










.-i'.t 














a 






^ 


o 9 


■H=M 




ffl b 


































:z; 






-^ 


H 


^ 


(/.• 


-/) 


2 








1 


James Cahill's Estate 


Peru 


350 


3 


2 


Sh. 


s. 


M. 


73. 420 


61.018 


12,402 




LaSalle C. C. C, No. 1 


LaSalle 


440 


3 6 


2 








70, 984 


60.590 


10,394 


■A 


LaS.C.C.C, LaSalle.. 




392 


3.6 


2 








64,091 


54.708 


9,383 


4 


Union... 




390 


3.6 


2 








74, 196 


60.741 


13,365 


5 


" Rockw'll 




37,^ 


3.6 


2 








40,815 


32.066 


8,749 


C. 


C.W. ct V. C. CNo. 1 


Streator 


90 


S 


7 


' ' 


' ' 


B. 


170,839 


110.350 


60.489 








110 





7 






iVI. 


163.409 


113, 35S 


50,051 


H 


Star Coal Co.. No. 2... 





SH 


5 


7 






B. 


65.618 


40,861 


24, 757 


<t 


•• 3... 




125 


3 


2 






M. 


21,873 


16, 774 


5.099 


in 


Acme Coal Co 





110 


6.6 


7 


' ' 


' ' 




51,800 


34,534 


17.266 


11 


Wni. Howe <fc Co 





50 


5 


V 








36, 137 


24,037 


12,100 


1?, 


Bate & Cotter, lesse's 




100 


5 


7 


" 


' ' 


B. 


24.452 


20.852 


3,600 


18 


Price& James 




32 


5 


7 




Ho. 


M. 


2.050 


1,457 


593 


14 


Nelson & Westerlund 




20 


4.8 


7 




" 




3.042 


2.742 


300 


1R 


Wm. Thomas Coal Co. 




60 


5 






s. 




3,065 


2.365 


700 






" :;;:;: 


40 

55 


4.6 
4.6 




" 
SI. 


Ho. 




1,485 
3, 309 


1.094 

2.889 


391 


17 


Swartho;;t Coal Co . . . 


420 


^y 


D. W Thorne 





,5(1 


4.6 


7 








850 


80C 


50 


V.) 


Benjamin Davis 




35 


4.6 


7 


Sh. 


" 




860 


760 


lOO 


'>n 


S. A. Munts & Son.... 




35 


5 


7 








3,168 


2,032 


1,136 




Robert Fairi>airn 




20 


4 


7 




" 




1,100 


1,OOC 


100 


?.:>. 


Alloway & Heiuze.... 




35 


5 


7 


D. 






85C 


70t 


150 






Rutland :::::: 


45 
500 


2.10 


2 


Sh. 


S. 




600 
76,248 


500 
61,130 


100 


•M 


E. Hakes 


15,118 


•/^ 


Ojrlesby Coal Co 


Ojrlesby 


404 


3.6 


2 








65,08C 


54, 23£ 


10,847 


•Ji; 


Standard Coal Co 


Seneca 


iOd 


2.9 


2 








14,001 


13,48t 


1.121 


■M 


MarseiliesL.&W.P.Co 


Marseilles 


12(; 


2.10 


2 


' ' 


' ' 




* 35,000 


35,000 




L'S 


I'harles ScotE 


Kana-ley 


75 


8.6 


7 






B. 


2,00C 


1,50C 


500 


?.9 


John McNeil 





75 


8.0 


7 


' ' 


Ho. 




500 


40C 


100 


;w 


Charles Kain 


Deer Park .... 


175 


3.6 


2 


D. 


S. 




240 


200 


40 


81 


Pmey Coal Co 


Streator 


05 


4 


7 


Sh. 


Ho. 


M. 


75C 


528 


222 


S'' 


Love & Sons ... 


Wilsman 

LaSalle 


73 
310 


4!6 


5 




S. 


B. 


1.000 

* 88.861 


700 

88,861 


300- 


3;f 


M. ct H. Zinc Co 




34 


U. S. Silica Co 


Ottawa 


45 


2.4 


2 


i). 


Ho. 


iVI. 


* 427 


427 




■Ah 


John Halffinch 




45 


2.4 


2 


" 






225 


20( 


25 


3(i 


Taylor & Jennings . . . 




5C 


2 


2 


' ' 


' ' 


' ' 


195 


165 


30 


;h7 


James Plaueer 




OC 


2 


2 








IOC 


IOC 










55 
00 


2.4 
2.4 


2 








175 
660 


150 
640 


25 


39 


James McCullough... 


20 


46 


Daniel Vezain 




oc 


2.4 


2 


' ' 


' ' 


' ' 


28C 


238 


42 


4] 


P. M. Fishhnrn 




0(: 


2.4 


2 






•' 


300 


240 


60 


4X 


John Delhridere 




• 45 


2.4 




' ' 


' ' 




425 


400 


25 


43 


Nelson Nelson 




,5(: 




2 








30C 


30C 








•• 


60 


2.4 


2 








200 


200 












1.165,490 


905,320 


260, 170' 








1 

...1 


















. 1 










i 1 



* Mine run consumed by the company. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 39. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 6. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 44. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



97 



LdSdllc Counfy, iS.9S— Concluded. 



.2 8 



j oS (Aggregate! g i o'-g i .^ 

I »■§ t 1^1"^ i p ; g§ ' o . 

I 3rt I of total I s^ I Sg ■^x! 

I "rt o 1 product. I ^ o ! '" be ' p c 



I Price paid 
I ^ per gross ton 



$1 42 
1 20| 
1 20 
1 20 
1 201 
89 
91 
93 
1 04 
93 1 
I lo! 
1 10| 
1 50 
1 40 
1 45: 
1 50 
1 25i 
1 501 
1 30 
1 50l 
1 001 
150 
1 251 
1 35' 
1 13l 
1 29, 
1 10 
1 50| 
1 25' 

1 25; 

1 50 
1 oOj 
1 00^ 
1 301 
1 50i 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 



1 £X 



2^ 



$H.606 

76,658! 

69,225! 

77, 672 j 

41,804| 

109,0071 

111,6641 

42,208: 

18, 108' 

35,152 

31,281 

25.817 

2,541 

3,944 

3,779 

1,797 

3.779 

1.218! 

I.OI81 

3,446 

1,025| 

1.1481 

700 

8B,305| 

65, 080 i 

17,726; 

3S.500! 

2,5001 

535 1 

270 

870. 

I.2OO1 

88,861! 

555! 

313 

263 1 

150 

197 

815 

329 

3751 

600 

450' 



163 

2251 
1801 
230, 



1151 
100 

50 
150 



4 

165! 12 
198i 34 
36 6: 
30 41 
4 



4 
3 
3 

'i 


'1 


1 

8 

1 














4 

3 





i 


'> 






2 












,6 


207 


29 


296 


24 


234 


28 


292 


17 


159 


18 


474 


25 


478 


11 


254 


7 


138 


10 


132 


9 


68 


10 
1 


185 


1 

1 


8 
11 



78 

60 

60 

64 I 

60 

08 

40 

85 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5' 
87. 5| 



475! 278J 3,647l |. 



. $0 



•50 



W. 
S-M. 
W. 

S-M. 
W. 





Acci- 




d'nts 


!p 












3 












«j 
























u. 




■3 







■a 


bo 


rt 


a 








bd 


fc 


"^ 



Caiiacity 

of 
mine- 
tons. 



230 
118 
125 
123 
111 
130 
125 
91 
133 
160 
221 
190 
135 
200 
130 
180 
1301 
125 1 
140! 
273! 
100 
200 
110 
136! 
1051 
21 18 



300 
100! 
160| 
150| 
280 
90 
160 
200 
120 . 
175 
200! 
100 
120! 
118 
160 
150 



105,000 
240.000 
150, 000 
240,000 
125,000 
395,000 
387,000 
180,000 
62.500 
12,000 
70. 000 
90,000 



5,000 
6,000 



8,000 
2,000 
9,000 
3,168 



2,000 

1,500 

100,000 

200.000 

20.000 

35, 000 

2,000 

500 

1.000 

i,(;oo 

6, 000 
105,000 

2,000 
800 
500 
300 
300 

2,000 
500 

1,000 

1,000 
500 
500 



Machine miners paid by the day. 



98 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Livingston Couniy — First District — 189S. 





• 


1 
i 


Desckiption. 




Ot'TPUT. 




















-feet 


es. 
mbe 

drift 


p 
2 


^ 






■J. 

4J 


Naiue of Operator. 


Postofficf. ' 1 

■ °G 


ness of 
and inch 

gical nu 
eam. 

slope or 


o 


o 


tonfnro Ton. 

'rceT|«fi--p- 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 
















Si 




SZ o-l "S gS 














<U 


^«H a>oia £a 










2; 




i° 


EH Z> \^ 


rj 


s 









1 Pontiac Coal Co IPontiac .. 

2 Diamond Coal Co | 

3 Walton Bros , Fairbury. 

4;Cooperative Coal Co..i 

5|A. M. Barackman jStreaTor . 

ehtreator Clay Mfg.Co.' 

7 Joseph Kilburn i 

S| John Caswell 1 

9[R. Evans, Jr., & Bros. I 

10 Thos. Edwards & Son; 

11 Oscar Kiraes ' 

12; Edgar Hamilton ; 

13|Kimes Coiip. Coal Co.! 

U J. Massy & Son \ 

15 Burrell & Reese \ 

JG C. <T. Dar.ii ; 

17 1 Henry Singer & SonslCornell .. 



464 i 
200 
180 
165 
57 
75 
40 
501 
40 
64 
35 



4 
4 
4 
4 
4 

4.6 ! 
4 ! 
4 I 
4.6 I 
4.10 
4.6 I 
3.6 



Sb.i S. 



5 

7 
7 
7 

7 
7 
7 
D. 

7 

7i " 
7jSh. 

71 " 



Total ^' 



Averages I — ' ! — ....; I. 

'' '' ill I 



25. 262 i 
5,7651 
54,942! 
12,3401 
1,564! 
4,1201 
2.692! 
1,200 
2,813! 
l,076i 
5.380 

175 

558! 

600, 
1,350' 

640j 
1,610' 



13. 550 i 
3,343' 

37,2951 
9,774! 



2,4131 

1.034! 

4, 170i 

125; 

468: 
500 

1,050; 
600: 

1,610; 



11,712 
2,422 

17,617 

2,566 

625 

' ■ ■ '892 
300 
400 

42 
1,210 

50 

90 
100 
300 

40 



83, 691 38, 396 



* Mine run; consiimed by Company. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 15. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 4. 

Number of mines exhau.sted or abandoned during tiie year, 2. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1808. 17. 



Will Couvtjj— First District^l89S. 



Description. 



Name of Operator. Postoftict 



Output. 



William Maltby JBraidwood 

Cooperative Coal Co.. I 
Robert Crichton 



60, 3 
551 2.10 
50: 2 



Totals 

AA'erages. 



2Sh. 

2 •• 
2 " 



Ho. 



, Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 
of lump. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



3.3,804: 26.676' 7.128 

5,100 4,000! 1.100 

2,000 1,800 200 

40,904 32,476 8,428 



Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 3. 

Number of new mines opened during the year. none. 

Number of mines exhau.sted or abandoned during the year, none. 

W'hole number of openings reported for 1898, 3. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



99 



Livingston Counttj, 18!)8 — Concluded. 




Values. 



Will County, 1S5»8— Concluded. 



IbMPLOTEe. 






Aggregate! 
value ! 
of total ' 
product. 



Z I O 



I Price paid 
iper gross ton. 






d 




Acci- 


o 




den's 








f, 


® 






s 









© 








1 V 


» 






























I :: 






-^ 








n 










ai 


« 


_ 




' >i 


tJt 




a 












W 


^ 


Z 



SI 35 
200 
2 00 


$1 46.6 



$37,795, 
8,550 
3.S00i 



83 $0 68 . 
21 100 I. 
8 100 !. 



... S-M. 177i 

...I '■ 180 
.... W. I 150| 

~! \Z7\' 



Capacity 

of 

mine — 

tons. 



60,000 
15.000 



100 



STATISTICS OF LABOK. 



Reccqy it Illation hy Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 


County. 


EC 

0) 

a 

o 


1 

a 


-a 

a! 
1 


s 


2 
a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Tons 
shipped. 


s 


Is 

-I 


o 

3 

H 

4. 




a 


1 


a 


12; 


«3 












tea. 

il 
<*- 


Grundy 


20 


10 


10 


1 


7 


796.249 


649,912 


146,337 


738.912 


1,986,000 


$1,069 


$725,731 


Kankakee.... 


2 


1 


1 


•■ 




84.632 


45,286 


39,346 


78.108 


204,000 


1.21 


61,106 


LaSalle 


44 


20 


24 


6 


1 


1,165,490 


905,320 


260, 170 


845,411 


2,573,668 


1.098 


1.060.794 


Living.ston . . . 


17 


7 


10 


4 


2 


122,087 


83,691 


38,396 


07, 470 


283,042 


1.27 


126,653 


Will 


3 


1 


2 


11 


10 


40,904 


32,476 


8,428 


29,611 


75,000 


1.466 


50. 145 








Totals 


86 39 47 


2,209,362 


1,716,685 


492.677 


1,759,512 


5,121.710 





$2,024,429 




1 
















$1.1045 






....|.. .. 


















Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 85. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 11. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 10. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 86. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



101 



First District— 1898. 



Employes. 


© 

1 


1 


Casualties. | Wages. 

[ 


Machines. 


i 

a 

g 

1 

s 

12; 


Number of other em- 
ployes. 

'J'otal employes. 


Average number of d 
active operation. 


ft 

•4-1 

ll 


3 


a 




3 



Average price 
paid per gross ton. 

For For 

hand machine 

mining, mining. 

1 


a 
i| 

"0% 

a.2 


1 
i 

Is 

s a 


k 

s 

>> 

7) 

a 


2,626 


501 i 3,127 

72I 190 
753| 3,647 
87 301 


172 
160 
161 


346 
2,040 
23. 136 


5 

7 


6, . 


n 


SO. 691 
.484 
.552 
.522 
.735 












2 

34 
6 




SO. 37 


1 
1 


9 
8 


6,022 
59,100 


2,894 


6 


17 


' 


158 2. 321 






831 291 112 


169 






















... 






5,935 


1,442| 7.377 


163.3 


27,843 


12 


103 


8 


29 


1 





17 


65 122 




$0,603 $0.37 


1 






1 



















COAL IN ILLINOIS. 103 



SECOND INSPECTION DISTRICT- 1898. 

rounties: Bureau, Henry, [Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Rock Island. 
Stark. Woodford. 

Thomas Hudson, Inspector, Galva. 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Sjtringfield, Illinois: 

Sir: — In compliance with section 12 of an act of the General Assembly 
defiuinj,-' tlie duties of State Inspectors of coal mines, and providing for the 
health and safety of parsons employed therein, I have the honor to submit 
herewitli to you the fifteenth annual report of the coal mines located in the 
Second Inspection District, comprising the coal producing counties of Bureau, 
Henry. Marshall, Mercer, Peoria, Rock Island, Stark and Woodford, for the 
year ending July 1, 1898. 

The tabular part of thi.-, report gives the number of mines in the district, 
both shipping and local; the depth of coal below the surface in all shafts and 
slopes; the thickness of the seams, and the geological number thereof; the 
number of miners and other employes engaged in the mining industry of the 
district; the number of days each mine was in operation during the year: the 
tlie number of kegs of powder consumed; the number of accidents, fatal and 
non-fatal; the number of tons of lump and other grades of coal produced, and 
the disposition made of the same, whether shipped, sold to local consumers 
or consumed at the mine, the prices per ton paid for mining; the value of 
lump and other grades of coal per ton at the mine, and the aggregate value 
of the total product. 

The following summary of coal produced, number of miners and other em- 
ployes, accidents and ratios is presented for the year: 

Number of shipping mines 1 **^ 

Number of local mines : 1*> 

Total nuinlier of mines i _ IM 

Number nf miners employed , 5,336 

Mumber of otlier employes \-i^'^ 

Total muiilier of employes : **• l'**!^ 

Number employe<l above ground ] _ *>!•> 

Number employed under ground j I^- ^^ 

Number of kegs of powder consumed *''• ^^? 

Tons of lump coal produced j 2,080.702 

Tons of other f,-rades produced i 470. 408 

Total product, tons | 2.551.110 

Tons of .'OM 1 shipped 2. 113. 432 

Tons ..f CO!.! sold to local trade ■•• 350,46.s 

Tons of coal cojisumed at the mines 87,210 

Number of f.-,tal accidents 10 

Number of n(m-fatal accidents w 

Total numlier of personal injuries '0 

Number of employes to each fatal accident t^^O 

Number of employes to eaili 'ion fatal accident . -. ^' 

Tons of coal produced to each fatal accident 25-), 111 

Tons of coal produced to each non-fatal acjident ■'-•;'*]^ 

Tons of coal produced tQ each employ^ •*" ' 



104 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



The coal production, by counties, in the Second district, with increase or 
decrease o£ output in each, for the years ending July 1, 1897, and 1898, is 
shown as follows: 



Decrease 
Increase . 



Total Output of all 
Grades of Coal— in Tons. 



Couxfv. 


" 


■| 


Increase. | Decrease. 




1897. 


t 
1898. 




Bureau. . . ... 


1.145.312 
119.497 
339,820 
425.518 
504. 309 
35.651 
19.472 
148.829 


865.892' 
159,049i 
286,365! 
384.345; 
640. 193 
47.490 
21.936 
145.840' 




279, 420 


Henry 


39. 552 




Marshall. 


53, 455 






41, 173 


Peoria . . 


135,884 
11.839 
2.464 




Kock Island 




Stark 




Woodford 


2,989 








Total 


2. 738, 408 


2. 551, 110' 

! 


189,739 


377,037 


. 





377,0.37 
189,739 



Net decrease. 



187.298 



The counties of Henry, Peoria, Rock Island and Stark show a gain of 
189,739 tons, and the counties of Bureau, Marshall. Mercer and Woodford a 
loss of 377,037 tons, leaving a net loss for the district of 187,298 tons. 

Neiv and Abandoned Mines. — Two mines have been opened in the district, 
and three have been abandoned during the past year. 

Shaft No. 2, operated by the Kewauee Coal Company, at Kewanee, Henry 
county, went into operation August 10, 1897, and a drift mine, owned by the 
Hayes Coal Company, of Muscatine Iowa, commenced operations, in a small 
way, in April, 1898. This latter mine is located on an arm of the Mississippi 
river, in Buffalo Prairie township, Rock Island county. A tipple has been 
built, and the coal will be loaded on barges and taken down the river to Mus- 
catine, which will be the principal market. Such, at least, is the present in- 
tention of the company, but it is very doubtful whether this mine can be 
operated successfully; the coal seam is less than two feet thick, and the roof 
is a rotten black shale, requiring cross-bars every two or three feet, even in 
the entries. Added to this, the mine, owing to its isolated location, can not 
be operated during the winter months when the river is frozen over. Hence, 
it is quite safe to infer that the product of this mine will not materially in- 
crease the output of Rock Island county. 

The three mines that have been abandoned were all operated by the Kewa- 
uee Coal Company, at Kewanee. Shaft No. 7, the old Lathrop mine, was 
worked out in July, 1897. Shaft No. 1 was worked out in April, 1898, and 
shaft No. 2, which went into operation in August, 1897, was abandoned in 
June, 1898. A combination of causes brought about this result. From the 
time the shaft was sunk, large numbers of "clay-slips," "horse-backs," and 
other irregularities for which seam No. 6.is noted weie encountered, making 
the successful operation of the mine rather difficult. The management strug- 
gled along, however, against adverse conditions^, until June, 1898. when the 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



105 



miners in tlieir service, about 100 in number, requested a change from tlie 
screened coal basis of paying to the gross-weight system, and stopped work 
until their demand should be complied with. The company could not comply 
with the demand of the miners, and promptly abandoned the mine. 

I)n2)rovements. —In the matter of improvements, those made by the Spring 
Valley Coal Company at their No. 2 mine are by far more extensive and 
costly than any made during the year. Masonry and steel have been used 
quite liberally at the bottom of the shaft to make it safe and durable. A 
Capel) ventilating fan, similar to that at the No. 1 mine, is in course- of eree- 
tion; this will secure excellent ventilation for this mine in the future. 

An escapement shaft 102 feet deep has been sunk by ShoU Brothers at their 
No. o mine, located near Bartonville, Peoria county. 

Newsam Brothers, have erected a 10- foot ventilating fan at their "Star" 
mine, in Peoria county, taking the place of the smaller fan in use previously, 

7.7,.(,,,..— A very disastrous fire broke out in the engine and boiler room of 
Newsam Brothers' mine, located at Kingston. Peoria county, on the morning 
of September 2G, 1897, by which four steam boilers were damaged, and the 
hauling engine, a small engine, the djmamos and a large stock of necessary 
material, usually found at a coal mine, were all practically destroyed. The 
scales, scale-house, tipple, etc., were saved. Horses were put to work on the 
slope to take the place of the hauling engine; hand mining took the place of 
the machines, and 24 hours after the lire the mine was in running order again, 
with a slightly decreased capacity. Everything destroyed by the fire has 
since been rebuilt and heavier and more substantial electrical and steam ma- 
chinery erected. 

The following is a detailed account of the fatal accidents that have taken 
place in the Second district during the year ending July 1, 1898. 

August 7, 1897, Bruno Lambrecht, a pump-man, aged 82 years, married, 
leaves a widow and two children, was killed by falling from the top to the 
bottom of the pump-shaft, a distance of 52 feet, at John J. Pryce's miue, lo- 
cated near Coal Valley, in Rock Island county. Deceased, whose duty it was 
to attend to the boiler and pump, came to work about noon on the above date. 
Another man had been acting in his place during his absence. When Lamb- 
recht came to the shaft he was informed that everything was working all 
right, but he insisted on going down the shaft, at the bottom of which the 
pump was located. He stepped on to the ladder, and had gone but a few feet 
when he slipped and fell to the bottom. He was dead when removed from 
the shaft. 

October 14. 1897. Charles Preller. a miner, aged uS years, married, leaves a 
widow and two children, had his leg broken by a fall of coal in the Roanoke 
mine, located at Roanoke, in Woodford county, and died from the effects 
thereof the following day. Deceased was at work in his room and in the act 
(if taking down a piece of loose coal, when it came away suddenly and caught 
his leg, breaking it just above the ankle. There was nothing in this accident 
that would lead to the belief that it would terminate fatally; but he never re- 
gained consciousness after the drug \Yas administered, as is usual in .such 
K?ases, before reducing the fracture. 



106 vSTATISTICS OF LABOR. 

November 20, 1897, Peter Syrk, a miner, ag'ed 42 years, married, leaves a 
widow and three children, was severely crushed by a fall of roof at the face 
of his working place in Minonk mine, located at Minonk, in Woodford county ,^ 
and died from the injuries received two days after the accident. Deceased 
was at work in his working: place, and knew that the over-hanging rock was 
in a dangerous condition. He was about to put up additional props to secure 
it, when it came down suddenly with the above result. 

December 6, 18'J7, Michael Schmidt, a miner, aged 28 years, single, was 
severely crushed by a fall of roof at the face of his working place in the 
Minonk mine, located at Minonk, in "Woodford county, and died from the in- 
juries received in a hospital at Bloomington, January 17, 1898. At the time 
of the accident deceased was in the act of wedging down coal at the face of 
his room. When the coal fell it displaced a number of props and let down 
about 1,500 pounds of roof, part of which fell on deceased, crushing him 
severely. He died 42 days after the accident. 

January 7. 1898, Edwai'd Madrill, a laborer, employed above ground, aged 
30 years, single, had his right arm terribly mangled by being caught in the 
ventilating fan at the Marquette mine, located at Marquette, Bureau county. 
Deceased was employed as a laborer, doing any odd jobs around the top-works 
of the mine. On the above date he went to clean and oil the bearings of the 
ventilating fan, which was running at a high rate of speed. By some mishap 
he got his arm inside of the fan casing, it was. caught by the rapidly revolv- 
ing blades and literally torn from his body. He was conveyed to a hospital 
at LaSalle, but died 12 hours after the accident. 

January 10, 1898, Benjamin Smith, a miner, aged .39 years, married, leaves 
a widow and three children, was severely crushed and had his back broken 
by a fall of roof at the face of his working place in Wantling & Son's mine, 
located at Pottstown, in Peoria eouutj'. Deceased was in a sitting posture, 
cutting the right hand side of the brushing, when a mass of roof, weighing 
about 1,000 pounds, suddenly fell, striking Smith and injuring him as above 
described. He died from the injuries received January 27. 17 days after 
the accident. 

March 30, 1898, John Rogers, trip-rider, aged 34 years, married, leaves a 
widow and three children, was severely crushed by being caught under an 
empty pit-car in the Wenona mine, located at Wenona, in Marshall county. 
Deceased was engaged as trip-rider; his duty was to accompany the trip on 
the engine plane from the shaft to the inside partings and out again. He was 
making what is termed a flying switch on the sixth north parting. He was 
riding in the first empty car, and had detached the "dog" or "preserver" 
from the trip, which was running rapidly. In throwing the rope from iu 
front of the trip he leaned too far forward, causing the front car to tip up, 
and becoming uncoupled from the second car, it went clear over, upside 
down, with Rogers under it, bi'uising him internally. He died from hemor- 
rhage two hours after the accident. 

April 23, 1898, William Hutchius, a miner, aged 'A years, married, leaves a 
widow and three children, was severely burned by exploding loose powder in 
the Alden Coal Company's mine, at Wanlock, Mercer county. Deceased was. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



107 



in the act of charging a drill hole with loose powder, contrary to law and to 
the rules of the company. He was down on his knees in front of the drill 
hole, and had a keg containing several pounds of powder by his side. He was 
throwing loose powder into the drill hole and ramming it back with an iron 
scraper. In doing so a spark was generated by the scraper striking a small 
ledge of sulphur in the drill hole, which exploded the powder in the hole, and 
the'flame therefrom exploded the powder in the keg, burning Hutchins as 
above described. He died seven hours after the accident. 

May 12, 1898, James Knox, a miner, aged 65 years, married, leaves a widow, 
was killed instantly by a fall of coal at the face of his working place in shaft 
No. 1, operated by the Spring Valley Coal Company, at Spring Valley, Bureau 
county. Deceased was iu the act of taking down a large fall of coal, and m 
removing the sprags the coal came down suddenly and caught him against a 
prop, crushing his breast and killing him instantly. The mass of coal that 
fell was about 24 feet long, and would weigh fully six tons. 

June 30, 18U8, James Salkeld, a miner, aged 31 years, married, leaves a 
widow and one child, was instantly killed by coal flying from a blast in shaft 
No. 2, operated bv the Coal Valley Mining Company, at Sherrard. Mercer 
county Deceased had fired one shot, and went back to the face to fire a 
second one. He lighted the match and left the face, but when only about 
twenty feet away from the shot it exploded, and large pieces of coal flymg 
therefrom struck him on the head killing him instantly. 

April 25, 1898. Patrick McQuade, a miner, a resident of Spring Valley, em- 
ployed in the Marquette Coal Company's mine at Marquette, Bureau county, 
was cleaning up a fall of roof in an entry in the above mine when a small 
piece of rock fell, striking him on the top of the head and cutting it. The in- 
jury was seemingly very slight, and it was not expected that he would lose 
more than a few days' work thereby. Other complications, however, set m, 
and McQuade died May 2, eight days after the accident. 

This death has not been tabulated as a fatal accident, because the attend 
ing physician certified that death resulted, not from the accident, but from 
endocarditis, or inflammation of the lining membrane of the heart. 

Following are the tables of fatal and non-fatal accidents, their causes and 
the nature of the injuries sustained; also, the regular county schedules of the 

district. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Thomas Hudson, 
State Inspector of Mines, Second District, 
Gal.va. 111. 



108 STATISTICS OF LABOR, 

Fatal Casualties — Second District, 1898. 



Date. 


Name. 


a 
< 


Occupation. 


Residence, |~ 

1 S3 


1 




6 

% 
c 


a 
a 


Cause of Accident. 


1897. 
Aug. 7 
Oct. 14 
Nov 26 


Bruno Larabrecht 

Charles Preller 

Peter Syrk 


32 
53 


Pumpman . . 
Miner 

Laborer 

Miner 

Trip rider . . 
Miner 


Coal Valley. 

Roanoke 

Minpuk 


1 
1 

1 


1 
1 
1 


2 
2 
3 


'i 
1 


3 

I 


Falling: down shaft.. 

Palling: coal 

Fallingr roof 


Dec. 6 




^8 


Falling roof 

Fan on the surface . . . 


1898. 
Jan. 7 
Jan. 10 


Edward Madrill 

Benjamin Smith 


30 
39 
34 
51 
65 
31 


Marquette . . 
Pottstown.. 

Wenona 

Wanlock.... 
SpringrVal'y 
Sherrard ... 


i 
1 

1 

I 

8 


i 

1 

1 
1 

1 

8 


\ 

17 


Mar. 30 


.. 4 

:: \ 

.:. 2 




Apr. 23 
May 12 


William Hutchins .... 


Exploding powder. . . . 


Jame.s Salkeld 






Totals 
























Total fat".l casualties, 10. 



Recapitidafion of Fatal Casiialties — Second District, 1898. 



Residence. No. Occupation. ' No. Nature of Casualty No 



Colliery. 



•Coal Valley...! 
Marquette. ...| 

Minonk I 

Pottstown ! 

Roanoke j 

Sherrard 

Spring Valley 

Wanlock | 

Wenona I 

Totals 



Laborer ... 

Miners 

Pumpman 
Trip rider 



1 I Empty pit car 



jExplod. loose p'dr.; 

jFallingcoal 

Falling down .shaftj 

I Palling roof I 

j Premature blast ... 
I Ventilating fan — I 
i 



Alden Coal Co 

Chicago Minonk C. C 
Coal Val. M. Co. No.2 
Marquette Coal Co... 

Pryces Mine 

Roanoke Mining Co . 
Spring Valley No. 1 . 
Wantling & Son 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



109^ 



Non-Faial Casualties— Second Disfrict—1898. 



1 1 ! 

Dat«. Name. j Residence. 

Si 

Hi 


i 


6 
"3) 
a 


Children. 
Dependent. 


Character of Injury. 


1 


1897. 1 
July 6] Peter Linn 40 


Cable 

Elmwood... 
Toluea 


1 

1 


.... 
.... 

!!!! 
1 

j 

!!!! 


..." f 

!!!!'!!!! 
' 4. 5 

5 6 

2' 3 

6 7 

4' 5 

■■■2:'"3 

!!!.!!!!. 

2 3 

3' 4 

4; 5 

4' 5 

3 4 
5; 6 

■■■2 "■3 

6 7| 

■■"2 "'3' 

T'i 

!!!!:'"ii 


Collar bone broken 


40 


Sept. fSMelvin Johnson.. 13^ 




''OO 


Oct. 14iFrank Baubles. .. J25 




60 


2I1J0S. Cumincavich!3l 
•• 801 John Brezenski..!25 
■• 30Claus Dude '53 


Minonk 


.... 


Arm broken 

Leg broken 


40 
I'O 


Sherrard 

Minonk 

Roanoke — 

Kingston!.! 
Minonk 

Wenona — 

Minonk 

Marciuette . . 

SprgValley 

Wanlock.... 

DePue 

Kewanee.... 

Spr'g Valley 

Coal Valley. 
Spr'g Valley 

Toluea 

.Minonk 

Kewanee.... 

Sherrard!! ;; 
Seatonville. 
.•Spr'gValley 

DePue 

Toluea 


1 

1 

' 

I 

.... 

1 

1 

i 

1 
.... 

1 

1 

.... 

1 

!!!' 

.... 
.... 


Bodv bruised 


''0 


Nov. SiGeorg-e Hellens..'40 




1-'5 


" 13 
•' 13 

" 17 
" 18 


P. W. Morris 45 

R. W. Ratclilfe... 55 

Chas. Evans 15 

T. Andenspring.. 50 

Anton Brusk |45 

Geo. Bahr. Jr....ll9 
JobnMolitski....!42 
JoeChristetto .. |30 

Chas. Bendris 37 

Frank Grodriras.i25 
.Joseph Nicoli ...140 


Finger broken 

Hand crushed 

Head bruised 

Leg broken 


21 

135 


" 22 


Shoulder dislocated 


30 


•• 22 






" 26 


Bodj' bruised. 


40 


" 29 


Jaw fractured .... 


40 


" 29 


Arm cut 


35 


Dec. 1 




•'0 


4 


Leg bruised 


25 


1898. i i 
Jan 4j William Black... 130 




05 


7 Geo. Griffith 129 


Collar bone broken 


lO 


8 Fred Carl son 136 


Back bruised. 


30 


'■ 11 L. Linholm (40 




SO 


" 12lJohn Boetta 148 




30 


" 13 Thomas Fab)c....|45 






" 28 Peter Sabana !27 


Body bruised. . . . 


20 


•• 30 1). Philletts |30 




''O 


Feb. 3iJohn Williams. .. |45 






7!Joseph Perona...27 
8JA. Mesach |42 


Body bruised 


z 




39 
27 
44 
43 

42 
22 
15 
54 

20 

28 
30 






Mar. 2 
" 3 


Axel For- burg 

A. F. Carlson 

H. Kohlmorgan.. 
Thos. Keenan.... 

Thos. Osborn 

Frank Ismau 

S. McPherson.... 

James Miller 

John Galvetti.... 

John Clinton 

Joe Yanklomis... 


Ankle brok'n and body bruised 
[iibs broken and body bruised 
Leg broken. 


40 

48 
90 


4 


Back bruised 


15 


5 






•• 10 


28 


•■■5:--"5| 

!!!!■'"! 
■3 ■"■4I 

3, 4 

2 3| 

■■■3 '"4 
90' l''l 




m 


" 10 


Foot bruised 


i"* 


" 14 




40 


" 17 


Arm broken 


45 


'• 21 


Body bruised. . . 


80 


" 22 


Collarbone broken 


SO 


'• 25 


John Wood [30 

Geo. Griifith 29 

Julio Moreskini.. 33 
Joseph McKinney 19 
Adolph AndersonisS 


Arm broken 


60 


•• 30 






" 31 




S5 


April 4 


Elmwood ... 

Cable 

Marquette,.. 

Spr'gValley 

:; 


i 

\ 

l 

1 
.!.! 


Leg broken. . . 


63 


" 18 


Foot l)ruised. 


■'0 


" 19 

•• 19 

'• 26 

May 15 

" 17 


James Craig, Jr.. 
Barto Bellegank. 
John Roganiski.. 
Jos. Sfhivinski.. 

John Barto 

Louis Hody 

D. Kenneck 

Nels P. Sehultz.. 
John Saunders... 
Wm. McAdams.. 
Joseph Backer... 


i 

18 
28 
24 
35 


i^inger crushed 

^es broken (small bone) 

jeg bruised 

Body brui.sed 

Body bruised 


34 
30 
20 
50 
40 


" 17 
" 20 


38 Toluea 

40 Spr'g Valley 

45 


Hand severely crushed 


90 


" 21 


"Vnkle bruised 


30 


•• 23 
• ■ 26 


19 
18l 
45; 


Hollis 


3ody severely bruised 




JunelOiHutrh Dewyer... 


Marauette..., 


~J> 


Ankle bruised.. 


24 


'• ISBaptiste Matiado 


33!SprgValley! 

29i 






" 21 Mike Cisco. 


Body bruised 


* 




Totals. 








1 


i 


90, 1.1 1 





Not recovered, July 1,1898. 



Total men injured 

Not recovered July 1, 1898 

Number recovered 

Total time lost 

Average time lost per man recovered 



3 
57 
2.810 days 
49.3 •• 



110 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recap it uldt ion of Non-Fatal Casualties — Second District — 189S. 



Cable 

Coal Valley... 

DePue 

Elmwood 

Hollis 

Kewanee 

Kingston \ 

3Iarquette i 

Minonk I 

Roanoke 

Seatonville. ..1 

Sherrard 

Spring: Valley 

Tolusa 

Wanlock 

Wenona 



Totals 



No. Occupation. No. Cause of Accident. No 



Cagers 

Drivers 

Miners 

Mine manag-er 
Roadman 



Cage 

I Coal fall's: d'nsh'ft 
iPalli'gcoal in mine 
iPalli'g rock in mine 
iPly'g: coal from sh't 

Pit cars 



Colliery. 



AldenCoalCo 

C.,W.& V.Coal Co.. 
Coal V. M. Co.. Cable 
CoalV.M.Co.,yh'rra'di 2 

Devlin Coal Co 4 

Elmwood Coal Co — | 2 
German Coiip. C. Co. 1 
j Kewanee Coal Co — I 4 



iKingstou Coal Co.. 
Marquette Coal Co. . . 

Minonk Coal Co 

iPryce.John 

1 Roanoke Coal Co 

ISpring Valley C. Co. 
Wenona Coal Co 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Ill 



TdhU' slioiniiij fhc Xa^in-r of Injuries. Xiniihc)- of I'ersonx In- 
jured, Dcpriulriih. TlUK' Losi. with Arcrnij^'s cikI I*rrreufiif/('s, 
Second Districf. 



Nature -t^F In.iurv. 



Per cent 

of 
Total Averagre :ii).iurie,'i. 
daya. | days, i 




Ankle broken — 
Ankles bnii.sed.. 
Ankle dislocated 
Arms broken 
Arm bruised. . 
Backs injured 
Bodies injure^ 
<'i)ll-i:'liiines broken 
l-"eet injured 
Fiugrer broken 
Finjrer crushed 
Hands injuret 
Heads injured 
.Taw fractured 

[jCi^s broken 

Le?s bruised 

Ribs broken 

Shoulder disloi-ated 
Toes I>roken 

Total, averages and percentagre; 



40 


1.66 


27 


3.34 


28 


1.66 


46 


8.34 


o5 


1.66 


;n.3 


6.67 


31.8 


18.34 


53 


(J. 67 


20.4 


8.34 




1.67 


34 


1.67 


.■)4.S 


8.34 


24 


1.66 


40 


1.66 


9H 


18.34 


21.7 


5 


48 


1.66 


30 


1.66 


20 


1.66 


49.3 


100.00 



112 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Bureau County — Second District — 1SD8. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




De 


SCRIPTION. 




Output. 


g 


1 
J_ 

o 
c 
tt-l 
o 

1 


Thickness of coal— 
feet and inches. 

Geological number 
of seam. 


Shaft, slope or drift. 

Isteam.horse or hand 
power. 


1 

o 

c 


Tntnl Tons 

1 

! 


1 


Spring V'yC. C. No. 1 
No. 2-4 
No. 3 
Whiteb. F.C. Sh. "B" 
Marquette Coal Co . . . 
Chi..Wil.& V^er.C. Co 
Sh.^ffieia Mining Co.. 

Z. E. Williamson 

.J ohn Duncan 


Spring Valley 

Ladd 

Marquette — 
Seatonville... 
Sheffield 

...... 

Princeton 

Mineral 

Neponset 


345 
342 
481 
465 
302 
410 
45 
80 
22 


3.6 

3.6 
3.6 
3.6 
3.6 

'A 


2 

2 

1 

2 

1 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh.js. 


M. 


197.042 
127,633 
171.029 

87,840 
134,941 
113,035 
17,298 
3, 282 
907 


157,634 39.408 
IO2.IO61 25.527 


3 

4 
5 
6 

7 

t 

10 
11 
12 


:: 1 :: 

SI. Ho. 

Sh.j •' 
SI.! " 

Sh. :: 


;; 

B. 


136.823 31,206 
70,975! 16,866 
117,923' 17,018 
93,738; 19,297 

17.298! 

3.2821 

907! 


Peter Dime an 

Paul Bros 

William Smith & Son 
A. W. Walton 


40| 4.6 
40l 4.6 
147! 4.6 
150j 4.6 
200 4.6 
151 4.6 
201 4.6 
64! 4 


547i 547; 

480! 4S0: 

3. 1781 3. 178| 

3.000 3.000! 


14 
15 

16 

17 


lieorgre Heatheock . . . 

William Brandt 

Tucker & Fall 

Silas Riley 


6 
6 
6 
6 


:: t :: 


M. 


2.371 2.371 

1.538 1.538! 

1.171 1.171 

600( 6O0! 














865.892 


713.571! 152, 32£ 






















1 








■■■■|"" 









Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 18. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 

Whole number of openings reported for 189S, 17. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



113 



Bureau County, i85'<S— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 






Acci- 
den's 






aS 




a 


a 


> 




Price paid 


2-^ 


R' 


S 










^a 






-S 


^ 


^ 


per gross ton. 


is 


> 


« 






Capacity 
of 






























°5 


Aggregate 








o 


'i 


<p 




■*3 


^ 






mine — 






vahie 




•^ a 




--• 


9 




5 o 


« 






tons. 


1 


^2 


of total 
product. 


°% 


as 


o 






ll 


if 


o 


ft 

1-1 

o 


~ 


■5 ! 


3 


^^ 




r- 


o"^ ' <*^ 


p 


^2 


^a 


■A P 


I 


M 


l^^\ 


1 


$1 15 


§191,919 


525 


69 


22 


616 


$0 63 1 


S.M. 


154 





1 


11 


450,000 


2 
3 


1 15 
115 
1 16 


124,314 
166,582 
90, 594 


400 
525 
263 






















67 
02 


36 
30 








1=^1 






3 


350, 000 


355 


63 1 


" ! 95 


15 






300,000 


5 


1 10 


133,969 


244 57! eO 


361 


63 1 


" 168 


12 


1 


7 


260, 000 


fi 


1 03 


99,830 


?80 


40 1 25 


345 


63 


124 






I 


225, 000 


7 


1 75 


30,271 


40 


6i 4 


50 


87.5 





M. 300 


12 






20, 000 


H 


1 75 


5,743 


8 


2 


10 


75 




S. M. 140 


25 






8,000 


9 
10 
11 


1 50 
1 75 
1 50 


1,360 
957 
720 


3 
3 
3 




3 
4 
4 


75 




W. 1 200 








1,000 






150 








500 


::::::! \ 


75 




" 


80 


12 






2,000 






5,561 


fi 








100 




S. M. 


200 


87 






8.000 


13 


1 75 


5,250 


6 






7 


1 00 






175 


100 






12,000 


11 


1 75 


4 149 


6 






7 


80 





M. 


19f- 


81 






4,000 


15 
16 
17 


1 50 
1 50 
150 


2,307 

1,756 

900 


3 












W. 


-m 








•5,000 






5 


75 





S M 


no 




1 


5,000 






4 


87.5 


W. 


120 


7 


... 


800 






$866, 182 


2,322 






2,915 


i 






351 


21 31 


2,011,300 




$1 15.4 






$0 63.9 






160 
























1 




1 



114 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Henry County —Second District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

3 

D 


T 

2 

o 

1 


1 

"I 

II 


3 
a 

la 

§ o 

03 


r. 

o 

1 

'a 


1 

'z 

o 

% 

03 


1 
o 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

other 
grades 


1 


Kewanee C. Co. Xo. 1. 
Kewanee C. Co. No. 2. 
Philip Henry 


Kewanee 


80 
108 
72 
68 


4 

3.6 

4.4 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2.8 

4 

4 

3 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh. 

D. 

Sh. 

D. 

Sh. 

SI. 


S. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 
s. 
Hd 


M. 

B. 
M. 

B. 
M. 


27,404 

28.390 

6.800 

5.436 

3.915 

2.230 

1,600 

820 

1,100 

800 

600 

480 

400 

300 

300 

280 

275 

24, 934 

7,100 

7,034 

848 

25,000 

2,200 

2.026 

1.691 

1,000 

3, ,546 

1,400 

1,080 

60 


24,841 

24,568 

6,400 

5.036 

3.715 

2,230 

1,400 

820 

1,100 

800 

600 

480 

400 

300 

300 

280 

275 

23, 750 

6,700 

6.634 

648 

19. 000 

2.200 

2.026 

1.691 

1.000 

2.726 

1,400 

1,080 

60 


2,563 

3.822 

400 


4 


Bernard Kirley 

Matthew Atkinson ... 
Bates Bros 


400 
200 


{\ 


:: ■■■■■■ 


67 




7 

s 


W. H. Lyle 

Martin Bros 


200 


9 
10 


Garland & Dixon 

Groy & Son. 


Galva . ' ' .' 


66 
40 
35 
32 
30 
20 
25 
25 
60 

i 

57 
25 
45 
30 
40 
30 
20 
130 







Ralph Todd 












G. T. Shultz 





11 


Joseph Pyle 


6' " 
6 '• 

6] " 

6Sh. 
gi .. 

%■■ 
%k 

3 '• 
3jSh. 

3 '• 










16 
17 
IS 


P. Malone& Son 

Thomas Carter & Son 
Herdien C. Clo. No. 14 
Herdien C. Co. No. 12. 

James H. Murray 

McKane& Reed 

John McCaffrey 

.James Waine 


i.isi 


19 
20 
21 
22 

9^ 


Davenport, ia. 
Atkinson 

Cambridge ... 
Coal Valley... 
Briar Bluff ... 


400 

400 

200 

6.000 




''.f 


D. 0. Loy 




''S 


James Kay . . . 




26 

''7 


Richard Marley 

•James Pairlie 


3 
3 

1 
I 
1 


SI. 
Sh. 
D. 


820 


28 
29 
30 


John Summerson — 

James Kershaw 

Timothy Downing ... 

Totals 






159, 049 


142, 460 


16. 589 







































i 







Whole number of opeaings reported in 1897, 29. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year 7. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 30. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



ii; 



Henry County, 189S — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


a 

1 

1 
o 


1 

•a 
1 

A 

'o 

1 


Aoci- 
den's 






< 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 

1 

a . 

on 


a 

3 

i 


0) 

1 

1 

a 3 

0.0 

5" 


1 

o 

p. 

a 

o 


Price paid per 
screened ton. 


11 

-5 O 










1 


Capacity 


1 
s 

z 


"S 


a 

as 

1^ 


mine- 
tons. 


1 $1 25 


S32.332 

32,621 

9,600 

7,554 

5,572 

3.345 

2,100 

1,230 

1,650 

1,200 

900 

720 

500 

375 

450 

420 

412 

30.279 

10.385 

10,614 

972 

31. 500 

4,400 

4,052 

3.382 

2.000 

5.862 

1.400 

1,620 

90 


50 
90 
16 
13 
8 
6 
4 
3 
4 
3 
2 

1 
1 

i 

18 
17 
3 


5 

8 


5 

8 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


60 
106 
18 
16 
10 

5 
3 

4 
2 
2 

2 

1 

55 

19 
4 

74 
8 
6 
5 

i 

5 
3 

1 


SO 75 
75 

87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
75 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 

i^ 

80 

80 

50 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
125 
1 25 

75 

75 

75 


:::::::: 
:;:::::: 

:;:::::: 


S-M. 

w. 

S-M. 

vv. 


240 

180 
275 
233 
250 
160 
200 
150 
150 
150 
100 
120 
140 
150 
100 
120 

80 
220 
250 
300 
160 
140 
250 
200 
200 
200 
200 
110 
150 

30 










2 1 25 






4 




3[ 1 50 






10 000 


4 1 50 








5^000 


5 1 50 










6 1 50 








10 000 


7| 1 50 








10,000 


8' 1 50 








6,000 
8,000 
6,000 


91 1 50 




1 

1 








10] 1 50 








111 1 50 








4 000 


12 


1 50 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 55 
1 60 
1 50 

1 50 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 
200 
1 00 
1 50 
150 












4 000 


13 












4,000 
4,000 
4.000 
3,000 
3.000 
40,000 


14 













15 













16 












17 












18 




4 
2 

1 
1 

8 
1 
1 

1 








19 








W 








15 000 


21 








5,000 


22 
2ii 


•?! '. 

51 

4 


1,350 






48,000 
6,000 


24 








6 000 


^25 








6,000 


?»(! 


4 










6,000 
10,000 
4.000 
1,000 
100 


27 


7 

1 

1 


1 


1 


155 
65 

27 




.... 


W 






.30 














" 


~~i 






$1 40.7 


$207,537 


394 


26 


41 


461 






1,597 


245 100 




t 
$0 82.8 






173 































* Worked out and abandoned, 
-t Per screened ton. 



116 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Marshall County — Second District — 1S98. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


a 

125 


3) 

o 

o 

'o 
.a 
"S 
Q 


1 

11 


a 

a 

li 

O 


o 

o 


1 

o 

^^ 
o . 

il 


•6 

1 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Toas 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 


DevlinC.Co.No.l,3d V 
No.l.lst.2dV 

Wenona Coal Co 

Marquette Coal Co.... 

Robert Ingram 

A. B. Ciimming 

L. NighswoDifer 

Bernard Lanning: 

George Chrismaii 

James Medearis 


Toluca 

Wenona. ...... 

Sparland 


512 
375 
555 
164 


2.8 

4 

2.8 

2.6 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

3.10 

4 

3.8 

3.10 

4 

4 


2 

5 
2 

7 
7 

7 
7 
6 

7 
7 


Sh. 
D. 


s. 

Hd 


M. 
B. 


207,987 

10,000 

46,967 

17,463 

740 

360 

300 

208 

168 

700 

492 

400 

340 

240 


162,759 

7.500 

35,800 

16,031 

740 

360 

300 

208 

168 

7C0 

492 

400 

340 

240 


45,228- 
2,500 

11,167 
1.432 


(; 


• ' 






7 








8 


• > 






q 








10 


Henry 














1'' 


William Horrocks.... 

Frank Daniels 

William Bough 


' ' 














11 


















286,365 


226,038 


60,327 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 14. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 14. 

* Both. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



117 



Marshall County, 1898 — Coiu-luded. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 




i 


1 Accr- 






















1 

0. 


-6 i^^ 


N-S 






II 




i 


a 


> 




Price paid 


.1 >> 

as 










2 










■il 


Agrgregate 
value 
of total 


a 




1^ 


1 


per gross ton. 




1 


i 

o 

p. 






Capacity 

.of 
mine- 
tons. 




■6 
c 


05 
a 


1 


product. 


OP. 


5t3 


so 

— in 


I 




So 
S'3 
S2 


sa 
^1 


"o 


o 

Si 


3 


1 

o 




•^ 


>< 




25 


o 


<: 


^ 


fe 


fa 


(i( 


M 


M 


fa 


'/r, 




1 


St 2i 


$226,062 


372 


47 


56 


475 


$0 63 




S-M. 


a 


19 




4 


300,000 




1 15 


9:875 


79 


10- 







47 






229 


1.200 






10,000 


3 


1 26 


50,691 


150 


30 


20 


200 


63 






134 




1 


1 


250,000 


4 


1 10 
1 25 
1 25 
I 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 
1 25 


17 920 


46 


5 


5 


56 


63 
















t; 


'925 
450 
375 
260 
210 
875 
738 
500 








2 

2 
1 
1 
3 
2 


75 

75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 






150 
100 
100 
140 
120 
170 
180 
140 
150 


40 
12 
10 






1,000 


fi 






500 


7 






500 


9 






300 








4 

6 






200 


10 






1,000 








500 


P 






8 






500 








500 




1 25 


290 








1 


75 




'■ 


125 


4|.. 




500 














$309,596 


664 


92 


81 


SV 








1,303 


1 


5 


655, 500 




$1 24 










$0 62.6 






160 














1 



















118 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



3'Iercer County — Secoiid District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




OlTTPUT. 




1 
s 


I 
o 

t 




u 

a 

c 

Is 




a 
_o 

03 

.a 

02 


1 


« 

. 
ja ^- 
^ aj 
§^ 

as 


1 



1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Coal V. M. Co. No.].. 

'• No. 2.. 

Camp Creek Coal Co. 

B. B. Peterson 


Cable 


60 


4 


1 


Sh. 

D. 
SI. 
D. 


S. 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 
Hd 


B. 
M. 


73,273 
103,049 
21,520 

2,328 


49, 118 
65,412 
16,000 


24, 155 


2 
3 


Sherrard 

Cable 


203! 4 
701 3.8 

651 4 


37,637 
5,520 


\ 




300 


5 




37| 3 
1351 4.6 
100 4 
60| 4 
40! 4 


l,600l 1,600 
89.935] 56,693 
73.025 53,593 
4,100i 4,100 
1,8001 1,800 
l,600l 1,600 
2,600! 2,600 
1.2001 1.200 
2,300; 2,300 
2,235> 2,235 
600! 600 
2 700i 2.700 




6 

8 


Alden Coal Co 

Empire Coal Co 

W.P.Williams 

G. W.Martin 


Wanlock 

Gilchrist 

Laoc 


33.242 
19,432 


q 






10 


John Dunn 




45! 4 1 1 




11 
12 

13 
\\ 


T. Docherty & Sons.. 

William Penman 

Edward Boden 

GriflRn Clay Mfg. Co.. 

Andrew Peterson 

William Barr 

Charles Knuteson 

Totals 


Preernption... 
Griffin 


60 
48 
58 
35 


4 
4 

4 

2.6 

2.6 

4 

2.6 


1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 




15 






16 


Viola 


30 




17 


New Windsor. 


480 


480 






384.345 


264.059 


120, 286 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 16. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during tlie year, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 17. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



119 



Mercer County, 1898 — Concluded. 



Capacity 

of 
mine- 
tons. 




120 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 

Peoria County — Second District — 1898. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 








-r, 






a 


'o 


3 






o 






f.^ 


o 




CO 


















O 


03 



Total 

tons pro 

duced. 



Tons 
of lump. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



Newsam Bros. .Kings- 
ton 

Newsam Bros. (lessee) 
Star 

Newsam Bros, (lessee) 
Hanna City 

Sholl Bros.. No. 1 

No. 3 

Wolschlag Coop.C.Co. 

Peter Grant. J r 

Royster & Zeigler 

Vicary Bros 

F. P. Schmidt & Sons 

Frederick Mohn 

Martin & Lane 

Richard Cody 

Schneider & Ennis. . . 

Daniel Birdois 

•John Birdois 

•Tame!: Lane 

Joos & Rumpel 

Edward Brost 

Cook Bros 

John J. Saupe 

urr Pitcher 

James Sargent 

Collier Coop. Coal Co. 

Bartonville Coal Co.. 

Joseph ShoU & Sons. 

Ball Coal Co 

Wolland Bros 

George Kellar & Sons 

White Coal Co 

Brown & White 

Lot Hurst 

Elm wood Coal Co 

Reed City Coal Co.... 

Wautling & Son 

Harry Vicary 

Alfred .Jones 

How'th & Taylor Bros 

C. B. Kramm 

Mike Cusack 

German Coop. C. Co.. 

Lowery Estate 

Smith Miller...'!!!;;!; 
Potter Bros. (lessees). 

J. Morrison 

Frank Jones 

David B. Roberts 

W. E. Foley 

Thomas Jones 

Jefford Bros 

(lessees) 

Nathan Shaw 

Joseph Crew 

John Jurdon 

Robert Taylor 

Martin Armentrout. . . 

Charles Berry 

* Both. 



Peoria 


180 

130 

250 
100 

80 
150 
105 

75 






" 


130 


' ' 


55 










• • 








' • 












• ' 








Bartonville ... 

Elniwood 

Wolcott 

Pottstown .... 

Edwards 


180 
100 
120 
96 

■'65 

'ais 

90 
112 






" 





Orchard Min' 



Mapleton 

Kingston Mi'; 



Kramm 

(;hilIicothe.. 

Trivoli 

Princeville . 

Duncan 

Monica 



5'D. 

5' " 

5Sh. 

5 D. 

5Sh. 

5 D. 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

i 

51 
5] " 
5Sh 



SI. 



Hd, 



77. 119 

33. 579 

25, 050 
35,750 
54,588 
61, 704 
16,000 
12. 168 
11,556 
5. 

2,480 

2,200 

2.160 

1,758 

1,710 

1,450 

1.400 

1,052 

920 

776 

614 



33,843 

12,594 

7,410 

9.659 

6.880 

3,502 

3,200 

1,000 

800 

63.874 

47. 107 

31.533 

840 

400 

13, 550 

4,040 

2,760 

10, 807 

2,223 

1,650 

1.920 

1,500 

520 

450 

350 

12,565 



52,001' 25,118 
22,386 11,193 



17.606! 
33,750' 
38, 105 j 
61.204 
13.008, 
8,7361 
11,356 
4,098, 
2,480 
2,200 
2,160 
1,768 
1.710 
1,450 
1,400 
l,052i 



776!. 

614|. 

600 . 

384'. 
33,843;. 
10,594; 
6, 700 I 
9.409 
6,680 
.3.002 
3,200,. 
1,000 . 

8oo;. 

54,924; 
41.609 
30, 933 



400 

12, 994 i 556 

4,040 

2.760! 

8.796! 2,011 
2,163 60 
1,350 300 

1.920! 

1,500| 

520 

450 

350! 
8.565 



646 


646 


7. 600 


7.600 


1,000 


1.000 


68(1 


680 


675 


675 


m 


460 


370 


370 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



121 



Peoria Courify, i8i)8— Continued. 




122 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Peoria Count y — Second District — iS56' — Concluded. 









Description. 


Output. 




*: 


X 


^ 


« 


T3 

a 
















1 






-a 


J 










i 


Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


o 


OB 

i1 


M 


1 


o . 


.5 
3 

o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grade.'' 


% 






p. 


•^■g 


oV 


■P! 


i^ 
s® 






• 






■ 












^ti 










^; 






O 


H 


O 


OJ 


(» 3 








59 


J.l. Aby 




1 
20! 4.6 1 6 


8h 


Ho 


M. 360 


360 




60 


William Vaughau .... 


Jubilee 


501 3 


5 






B. 270 


270 




61 


Philip Tully 


BrimfielU 


40 


4.2 


6 






370 


370 






Totals 










640. 193 


544, 248 


95, 945 




Averages 













































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 63. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 8. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 10. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 61. 





Eock Islcmd County 


—Second Distric 


t—1896 








Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Outpl't. 


.a 

1 


1 

T 

1 

.a 
a 


I 

11 

!5 


a 

n 


•5 


0. 






IS 


-a 

3 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

3 
4 

5 
6 


Banner Coal Co 

Black Diamond C. Co. 
Jos. Wilkinson & Co.. 
Robert Summerson. . . 
James Sackville 


Coal Valley . . 

Loding 

Haraptou 

Milan 


40 
50 
25 

"so 

30 

■■56 
65 
30 
40 
56 
70 
40 
50 
53 
48 


3.6 

3.6 

4 

4 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3 

4 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.6 

3.8 

1.8 


1 

1 

1 


t 

D. 

Sh. 

D," 

!■ 


S. 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 

Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 

HO. 


M. 
B. 

M. 

t 

M. 


7,375 

2,608 

2,145 

1,067 

662 

412 

320 

300 

8,006 

2,892 

1,954 

5,200 

1,145 

800 

476 

420 

5,825 

1,280 

3,903 

700 


7,075 

2.308 

1,845 

1,067 

662 

412 

320 

300 

7,756 

2,592 

1,604 

5,000 

1,145 

800 

476 

420 

5,475 

1,280 

3,003 

500 


300 
300 
300 


7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


John T. Patterson.... 
William Wynn& Co.. 

John Hynd 

Jamieson & Donald .. 
Loding Bros 


250 

300 
350 


12 


Allison & Jamieson.. 
Guckert Bros. 


200 


14 

15 
16 


Frederick Vonach 

Charles Mangleson . . . 




17 


William Parker 

David Walsh 


350 


IS 






19 
20 


Silvis & Silvis 

Hayes Coal Co 

Totals 


Carbon Cliff.. 
Muscatine, la. 


35 




900 
200 






47,490 


44, 040 


3,450 
























! 



















Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 20. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 4. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 4 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 20. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



12a- 



Peoria County, i85S— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 









ACCI- 
den's 




















^ 


'S 








a« 






a 






.~ >> 










S.S 




I • 3 







Price paid 


e.M 


© 














Agrgregrate 

value 

of total 


miners 
i. 

mployes 
ound. 


1 


>> 

c 

a 



per gross ton. 


i 



1 


S3 






Capacity 




-o 




mine- 
tons. 


1 




product. 


0. of 
ployec 

ther e 
der grr 


s 2 


-«.9 
a 

?;a 


- a 

o'a 


^a 








■3 


3 

a 




z 1 < 




^ 





■< 


H 


fe 


i, 


^ 


Q 


W 


&H 


Z 




59 


SI 50 


$540 


3 






3 


$0 75 ! 


W. 


90 








500 


fiO 


1 25 


337 


1 




1 


2 


75 




80 


17 






400 


61 


1 25 


462 


2 




1 


3 


75 1 





176 


21 


1 




500- 






$545,384 


874 


108 


no 


1,092 


i 


21,824 


4 


1,621,640 




$0 94.9 




1 






*$0 48 8 so ''7 





161 














1 














■■"! 



* Average for 458,652 gross tons. Average for 181,541 screened tons, 64.2 cents per ton. 



Eock Island Cou.niy, J.SV9S^C(:)ncluded. 





Values. 




EilPLOYES. 




Wages. 









Acox- 




















M 


a 


'6 


den's 






a = 




S 


■s 


> 





Price paid 






1 






5s 


Aggregate 


1 




>> 





per gross ton. 




> 


■a 






Capacity 


1 c£ 


Xi 0; 


of 
mine- 




S OS 


of total 


a 


d3 






S . i '.5 . 


s>= 




p< 




-^ 


tons. 


1 

a 


II 


product. 




0- 






For h 
mining 

For mac 
mining 


ii 








3 


3 




1 


$1 50 


$10,612 


18 


1 


2 


21 


$0 75 




W. 1 180 


200 


1 


, 


12.000' 


2 


1 50 


3,462 








6 


75 




S-M. 212 


115 






10,000 


3 


1 50 


2,767 


6 






7 


75 




W. 1 152 


125 






10,0«O 


4 


1 50 


1,600 


3 






4 


75 




•• 1 18C 


50 


, 




8,000 


5 


1 50 


993 


3 






4 


75 




" 14C 


35 






5,000 


6 


1 50 
1 25 
1 50 


618 
400 
450 


2 
2 
3 






2 
2 
3 


75 
75 
75 




" 160 
80 
70 


18 






500 


7 






500' 


8 






27 






500 


9 


1 50 


11,634 


16 


1 




19 


87.5 




•• 1 260 


200 






12,000 


10 


1 50 


3 888 


1(1 






12 


87.5 




" 1 20c 


150 






3,000 


11 


1 50 


2.406 


7 






s 


87.5 




" > 19C 


95 






8.000 


12 


1 50 


7,574 


1(1 






11 


87.5 




'• [244 


20C!.. 




12,000 


i;h 


1 50 


1,717 


4 







5 


87.5 




'• 1 155 


3 






1,200 


14 


1 50 
1 50 
1 50 


1,200 
714 
630 


3 

2 






3 
3 


87.5 
87.5 
87.5 




•' 140 

92 

'■ 120 


20 






1,000 


15 






500 


16 






35 






500 


17 


1 50 


8,212 


12 






14 


75 




" 20c 


180 






10.000 


18i 1 50 


1,920 


4 






5 


75 




" 15C 


100 






1,500 


19 1 40 


4.537 


1(1 




9 


12 


75 




M. 14C 


1371.. 




6,000 


20 


1 50 


850 


6 


1 


2 


9 


65 




•• ! 60 


1,720! 1 




1,000 


81 49.1 


$66,184 


128 


3 


21 


152 






1 


103,200 




$0 80.5 






156 








1 1 













124 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Stdrk County — Second District — 1808. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoflice. 


Description. 


Output. 


a 
i5 


1 
I 


1 

1| 

OS 

a =s 

11 


1 

a 

a 

M 

O w 


o 
5 


a 

OS 

o 

% 

;^ 

II 


■6 

o 
a 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


George R. Watson 

A. W. Higrbie 

James Higbie 


Wyoming 

\\ 


73 
70 
46 
20 
56 


4.6 
* 

4.3 

4.6 
4.6 
4.6 

4.8 

4.6 
3.6 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

i 

6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh. 

Sh. 
D. 
Sh. 

k. 

D. 

Sh. 

k 

SI. 
Sh. 


Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 

ii 

Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 


M. 

i' 

B.* 
M. 


2.030 

1,406 

800 

720 

600 

480 

448 

120 

1,440 

520 

240 

1,800 

1,440 

300 

2,200 

936 

890 

1.490 

1.020 

160 

1,200 

992 


2.030 

1.200 

800 

720 

600 

480 

448 

120 

1,440 

520 

240 

1.660 

1.440 

300 

2.200 

936 

800 

1,490 

1,020 

800 

160 

1.200 

992 


■"t'266 


4 






5 
6 


Stephenson (feWatsou 

Joseph Swanson 

Robinson Bros 

John Thurston 

Harrv Storey.. 




7 
8 


' ■ 


55 




q 


Toulon 


60 




in 


Henry Newton 

Peter Harburger 

Jesse Saville 

John Scott 

William Rennick 

French & Peterson... 

Charles Montooth 

William Jones 

John Catton. 




11 


' ' 






12 
13 

\i 

16 


Modena 

Bradford';;!!! 

!!!!! 

West Jersey.. 
Lombardville 

Lafayette 

Castleton 

Osceola 

Elmira 


65 
60 
50 
104 
138 
117 

'm 

30 

82 
30 
45 


t 266 

;;.;;;;; 


19 






Thomas Dodds 




'}•> 


Henry Green 




23 


J. M. Robinson 

Totals 






21,936 


21,536 


400 
























^ 





















* Both. 

t Slack used at mine for steam for pumping. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 22. 

Number of new mines opened during the year. 4. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 3. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 23. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



125" 



Stark CoiinUj, iSi'S— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


a' 



1 
3 


Acci- 
den's 






ftO) 




S 


a 


ii 




Price paid 
per gross ton. 


S3 


1 fe 











1 


Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 


1 


<c"eS 

< 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 
1 . 

^& 
do 
Z 


0-3 

£2 

it 

II 

o 


11 

0) p 

7^ Si 
< 


a 
3 

1 




i> 

n 

a a 


a >, 
."2 S 



1 


1 

ft 



S) 

a; 


fe 


3 
"S 

1 
Z 


1 


$125 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
1 50 
1 75 
1 25 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 


$2,537 

1,800 

1,200 

900 

900 

720 

672 

150 

1,800 

650 

300 

2,400 

2,160 

450 

3,850 

1,638 

1,400 

2,235 

1,785 

1,000 

240 

1,800 

1,240 


5 
4 
5 
3 
3 
3 

\ 
2 

4 
3 
2 
5 
3 
3 
3 
4 

4 
3 


:::::: 




1 
1 


6 
5 
6 
3 
4 
3 
3 
1 

5 
4 
3 
6 
4 
4 
4 
5 
3 
3 
5 
4 


$0.75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
65 
75 
75 

87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
87.5 
75 
1 00 
75 
75 
75 
75 




S._M. 


200 
180 
160 


■0 

I 

6 




.... 


20,000 
15, 000 


4 






:::::::: 


25,000 
10,000 
10, 000 


5 




1 


" ; 140 


6 




110 
140 
65 
155 
160 
100 
200 
129 
100 
180 
140 

IIS 

180 
1,50 
40 
160 
165 












'.'.'.'.'.'. 


1 








500 


S 








500 


9 
10 




1 


25 






20,000 
800 


11 










500 


12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


90 

J 

60 
70 
35 
40 






15,000 
10.000 
500 
8,000 
5,000 
5,000 
10, 000 


19 






5,000 
1.000 


21 








3,000 


??, 








4 000 


?3 








5,000 
















$31,827 


72 




18 


90 










44? 


174,300 




$1 48 












$0.80 






146 






1 
























1 





126 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Woodford Coiintij — Second District — 1898. 





Name of Operjitor. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


■u 

s 

3 

2 


1 

T 
1 

o 

a 
a> 
Q 


1 


a 

a 

\l 


© 
o 

CO 


13 

a 

S 

1 

o 

J ■ 


1 

a 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Ton.s 
of lump. 


other 
grades 


1 
2 


C. & M. C. & T. Wks. 
Roanoke Miniug Co... 

Totalsi 


Miuonk 

Roanoke 


552 

480 


2.8 
2.6 


2 
2 


Sh. 
Sh. 


S. 
S. 


M. 
M. 


75.000 
70,840 


61.500 
63.250 


13.5C0 

7.599 




145.840 


124.750 


2t 090 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 2. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 0. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year.O. 
Whole number of openiugs reported for 1898, 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



127 



Woodford County, 1S9S — Concluded. 





Valdes. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


1 

1 
> 

in 

& 

Q 


o 

1 

t4 


Acci- 
d'nts 






2-S i 

is 

0:= Aggregate 
.,-M value 
3 =^ : of total 
'^ g : product. 

>9 \ 


No. of miners em- 
ployed. 

Other employes un- 
der ground. 


1 

1 


1 

S 
1 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 


it 

s >> 

11 


i 

ii 


Capacity 
of 


5 

■Z. 


F or ban d- 
mining. 

For macliine 
mining- 


mine- 
tons. 


1 


SI. 25 $82,275 
1.25; 82,098 


1 1 
2001 30, 20 

155 21 12 


250 

188 


1 

.S0.63i 

.631 


S-M 
S-M. 


150 
171 


7 


i 8 

li 2 


125,000 
105.000 




S164.373 

•61 "Jt 


355 5l! 32 


438 








' 


3 10 


230. 000 




sn fi:-! 




160 







*'"l 




i i 






1 





Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898 



128 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties — 





M 


NES. 


Products. 


Values. 


County. 


i 

a 

a 


.5 


6 

1 

"=3 


1 




Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Tons 
shipped. 


.^ a 

ii 


is 
1 

111 


4 




a 


'S 

7j 


•si! 


c 

ci 










^2 

1= 




Bureau 


17 


1 


10 




1 


865.892 


713,571 


152.321 


800, 162 


2,011.300 


$1 15 


$866, 182 


Henry 


30 


4 


26 


7 


6 


159,049 


142,460 


16,589 


48.454 


245. 100 


1 41 


207,537 


Marshall.... 


14 


4 


10 


1 


1 


286,365 


226,038 


60,327 


263. 793 


655,500 


1 24 


309,596 


Mercer 


17 


5 


12 


3 


2 


384,345 


264,059 


120,286 


337.685 


867.700 


1 29 


418,613 


Peoria 


61 


24 


37 


8 


10 


640, 193 


544. 248 


95, 945 


535,088 


1,621.640 


95 


545,384 


Rock Island 


20 


2 


18 


4 


4 


47,490 


44,040 


3,450 


2,968 


103,200 


149 


66,184 


Stark 


23 




23 


/] 


<i 


21 936 


21, 536 


400 




174, 300 


1 48 


31.827 


Woodford... 


184 


2 

48 


136 


^ 


27 


145,840 


124.750 


21,090 


125,282 


230,000 


1 25 


164,373 


Totals 


2,551,110 


2,080,702 


470,408 


2.113,432 


5. 908. 740 




$2,609,696 


Averages.. 






















$1 16 





Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 184. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 27. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 27. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 184. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



129 



Second District— 1898. 



Employes. 


O 




Casualties. 


Wages. 


Machines. 




o 

1 


>> 
o 

& 

1 




-3 


'6 


o 


o 


Average price 
paid per gross ton. 


a 
a 

n 

1.1 


i 
1 


a 


a 
a 


1 

si 


1 

ll 


For 

band 

mining. 


For 
machine 
raining. 


a 


2,322 


67 
173 
287 
218 
24 
18 


...3 

461 

837 
814 


160 
173 
160 
171 
161 
156 
146 
160 


35l! 2 


31 

4 
5 
5 
4 
1 


1 

1 

1 
1 


3 
4 
3 


$0.64 

*.828 
.63 
.49 

+.488 
.805 
.80 
.63 










394 


1,597 
1,303 
15, 961 
21.824 
1,720 
442 
7 


1 
1 










664 










527 
874 
128 


$0.27 


- 




87,944 


72 










355 


83! 438 


3 


10 


2 


= 




















5 336 


1,463 6,799 


161,3 


43,205 


10 


60 


8 


17 






2 




87, 944 




:$0.585 




$0.27 

















*Per screened ton. 

t Average for 99,306 screened tons, 64.2 cents per ton; for 458,( 



gross tons, 48.8 cents per 



JAverrge for 310,590 screened tons, 75.2 cents per ton; for 2,122,576 gross tons, 58.5 cents 
per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 131 



THIRD INSPEGTI(3N DISTRICT— 1898. 

Counties: Brown, Fulton, Hancock, Knox, McDonough, Schuyler, Warren. 
John W. Graham, lyispector, Dunfermline. 



Hon. DA^'ID Ross, Secretary^ 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 
Sir : — In compliance with section 12 of the general mining law of the State of 
Illinois, I have the honor to submit to you the fifteenth annual report of the 
Third Inspection District for the year ending July 1, 1898. This report shows 
an increase in output of 140,667 tons over that of 1897. The largest increase is 
in Fultou county, although there is a considerable increase in McDonough 
county and some increase in the other counties. A good deal of coal from 
the local mines finds its way to the railway cars in the time of labor troubles, 
-as the railway companies pay good prices then for coal loaded on their tracks. 
The following is a summary of the report as taken from the statistical tables: 



Number of counties producing coal 7 

Total number of mines 217 

Number of shipping mines 21 

Number of local mines 19'"> 

Total tons produced "21, 84« 

Tons of lump coal 590, 299 

Tons of other grades 131. 547 

Tons shipped by rail 549, 799 

Average value of lump coal at the mines SI 10.8 

Aggregate value of total product $708, 691 

Number of miners 1, 497 

Number of other employes 298 

Total employes 1. 795 

Average number of days of active operation 135.4 

Number of kegs of powder used 21,601 

Fatal accidents 4 

Non-fatal accidents 12 

Wives made widows 2 

Children left fatherless .1 

Number of tons profiuced to each fatal accident ISO, 461 

Number of tons produced to each non-fatal accident 60, 154 

Number of employes per fatal accident 448 

Number of employes per non fatal accident 149 



Mine Fire.— November 30, 1897, the Meredith Bros.' mine at Augusta, Han- 
cock county, was destroyed by fire. It was a gin-shaft, worked with horse 
power. The gin and all the other buildings around the mine were destroyed. 
It took about two weeks to rebuild them and get in running order. 



132 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Netc Mines. — Georg'e VanWinkle, of Avon, lias sunk a shaft down to 
the No. 1 seam. It is located at his brickyard, and is intended to furnish 
coal for making brick and also for the local trade. The seam is about 30' 
inches thick and about 40 feet below the surface. 

Algreen and Simmons, at East Galesburjj, are sinking a shaft to the No. 2. 
seam at the (lalesburg Paving Brick Company's plant. They started to sink 
about the tirst of June, but they lost the first shaft after getting down 
nearly to the coal. They have now another shaft nearly completed. The 
seam is about 24 inches thick and is 70 feet below the surface. 

Labor Troubles. — The general strike of 1897 was not so extensive in this dis- 
trict as in other parts of the State, but in the latter part of July nearly all of 
the shipping mines were idle under the influence of the general movement. 
The men returned to work at different times and under different conditions, 
but the average advance that was gained was 2^2 cents per gross ton, and the 
time lost would average about thirty days. After that the mines run pretty 
steady for about three months, which accounts for the increase in production 
in this district. There has been no trouble of a general nature in this district 
since. 

At the Whitebreast Fuel Go's mine at Dunfermline there are two machines,, 
•worked with compressed air. The machines cut the coal from top to bottom, 
or perpendicularly in the middle; then the coal is blasted from each side of 
the cut. The machine runners and helpers are paid by the day, but all other 
•work is done by the gross ton, for which the miners receive 31 cents. The 
miners claimed that they could not make living wages at that price, so on 
the 'Joth of May last they came out on a strike. There were about 30 miners 
emploj-ed behind the machines and they were all that were involved in this 
trouble, as the hand miners remained at work. After being idle about 
five weeks the company employed other men by the day to do the work, and 
they are still working that way, but the controversy is still unsettled. Some 
of the old men have received work at hand-miniug and some have gone away. 
At the present time there are only five men unemployed. 

Abandoned Mines. — The mine at Bryant is still closed; it has not been 
worked for three years. The mine at Noi-ris 'has changed hands twice within 
the year. Of all the new mines reported there is none of any note. The coal 
is so near the surface that there are new mines being put in continually 
and old ones being abandoned. When the same parties abandon a mine and 
open a new one near by, it is reported as an old mine. 

Fatal Accidents. — Thomas Martin, aged 28 years, a miner, married, leaves 
a widow and one child, was killed August 30, 1897, in George Tryon's 
local mine at Farmington, Fulton Co. The deceased, with his brother, went 
into the mine to commence work, but on reaching their room the air was 
found to be unfit to work in, so they returned to the foot of the slope to make 
a fire to improve the ventilation: but, on reaching this point they were so 
exhausted that they both fell down and called for help. The call was heard 
by George and Ben Tryon, who were at the top of the slope. They came 
and took William Martin to the surface and he recovered all right, but when 
Thomas Martin was taken out it was found that he was dead. This is a new 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 133 

^nine, with a slope about 50 feet long, and the farthest point in the workings 
is only 70 feet from the foot of the slope. An air shaft was being put down, 
and it only lacked a few feet from the coal. Only four miners were em- 
ployed in the mine. 

John Cepuhar, aged 24 years, a miner aud single, was killed Decem- 
ber 14, 1897, in the Whitebreast Fuel (^o.'s mine '' C," at Dunfermline, Ful- 
ton countj'. Peter C. Shadick was his partner in the mine, and left him at 3 
o'clock p. m. There were two shots to be fired in their place, and Cepuhar 
agreed to wait till 5 o'clock to fire them, as they were not allowed to fire till 
that time. At 5:30 o'clock Shadieh became alarmed because Cepuhar did 
not come home, and he went into the mine to look for him. He found him 
lying in his roadway, about five yards from the face of his room. When 
found he was dead; the flying coal from the shots had struck him; his head 
was bruised all over and he was otherwise badly cut. From all the surrou'nd- 
ings it appears that after lighting his shots he had lost his light and became 
confused, and thus failed to make his escape to a safe place of refuge. 

Edward Williams, aged 24 years, a miner, who leaves a widow and one 
■child, was injured April 26, 1898, at the Colchester Coal aud Mining Co.'s 
mine, Colchester, McDonough county. He was working in room No. 13, in 
the southwest entry, taking out the pillar which, with his two partners, he 
had cut through the day before. On the above date he went into his room 
-with his partners, and had been at work only about ten minutes when a fall 
of the roof occurred which caught him. He was taken out from under the 
fall as soon as possible, and it was found that he was badly hurt, and he died 
in twelve hours. 

Ely Motley, aged 32 years, by occupation a miner and married, was injured 
ou April 28, 1898, at the Canton Union Coal Co.'s mine, Canton, Fulton 
county. The coal at this place is hauled with a rope up a small slope from 
the mine, and then up an incline to the dump. On the above date deceased 
was riding on the front end of a trip of cars up the incline to the top of the 
dump. When he reached the top his foot caught on a roller and he was 
thrown down in front of the trip of cars. The first car went over him and he 
was severely crushed, from the effects of which he died in four days. 

The management prohibits the employes from riding on the trips, but Mot- 
ley was one of the company and this day took liberties that others would not 
he allowed to take. 

The following tables give the details of the fatal and non-fatal accidents, 
and also the statistics of character and production for each mine of each 
-county in the district. 

RespecfuUy submitted, 

John W. Graham, 
State Inspector of Mines, Third District. 

Dunfermline. 



134 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Fatal Casualties— Third District— 1S98. 



Date. 


Name. 


1 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


■6 


o 


i 


a 


a 
p. 
Q 


Cause of Accident. 


1897. 
Aug. 30 
Dec. 24 

1898. 
Apr. 26 

'• as 


Thomas Martin 

John Cepuliar 

Edwai-d Williams 

Ely Motley 


28 
24 

-'4 
32 


Miner 


Farmington- 
Dnnf'rmline 

Colchester.. 
Canton 


1 

1 
1 

3 


1 

1 
1 

3 


1 
1 

9 


1 


2 

2 

1 

5 




Plying coal from shot 

Palling roof 

Run over bv pit-cars. 




Totals 










1 











Total fatal casnalties— 1. 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — Third District — 1898. 



Residence. 


.0. 


Occupation. 


- 


Nature of Casualty 


No. Colliery. 


No, 




1 

1 

1 

4 




4 


Palling roof 

Ply 'g coal fr'm sh't 

Inhaling gas 

Run ov'r by pit L*ar.s 


1 Canton Union C. Co.. 
1 Colchester Coal Co.. 

1 jTryon, George 

1 WhitebreastFuel Co. 


1 


Colche-ster... 
Dunfermline. 
Farmington .. 

Totals. 




1 

1 
1 

.1 















Non-Fatal Casu allies — Third District — 1898. 



Date. 



Character of Injury. 



1897. 
July 16 
Aug. 19 
Oct. 1 

• . ^2 

'• 22 
Nov. 2 

" 19 
Dec. 30 

1898. 

Jan. 27 

Feb. 24 

June 13 

'• 17 



James Taylor..., 

Wni. Jacobs , 

James Jackson ., 
Thomas Whalen 
Wm. P. Myers..., 

R. Davis 

James Watts 

Roy Spinney 



42!Wataga . 



Alex. McClain... 

Thomas Guy 

A. Hammerbach 
Enoch Blanch... 



Youngst'wni — 
St. David...! 1 
Galesburg..! — 
St. David...; 1 
Colchester..! 1 
D'nferniliue' 1 
Canton | 



49. Farmington I 1 
22 Colchester..!.... 
60 Middle Grvel 1 

■69 ' j 1 



Totals 



.... 






5 




6 


4 


20 



Ribs broken and body injured 

Leg broken 

Leg injured 

Back injured 

Overcome by powder smoke. . . 

Back injured 

Ribs broken 

Leg broken 



Body injured. 
Back injured. 
Legs injured . 
Head injured 



Total men injured 

Total time lost 

Average time lost per man. 



12 

439 days. 
36.6 '• 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



135 



Becapitulation of Non- Fatal Casualties — Third District— 1898. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Canton 

Colchester.... 
Dunfermline.. 
Parruington .. 


1 
2 
1 
1 

1 
2 

2 

1 
1 

12 


Cager 

Driver 

Miners 

Operator 

Pusher 


1 
1 

? 

1 
12 


Falling coal 

Falling from cage. 

Falling rock 

Gin sweep 


1 
6 
1 
2 

12 


Carbon Coal Co 

Canton Coal Co 

Farmington Coal Co. 
Bippetoe&Rundle.. 
Ross & Woodward. . . 
Sunday Creek C. Co. 
Taylor Bros 




(lalesburg .... 


Pit cars 




Middle Grove. 
St. David 


Powder smoke 

• 




Wataga 

Youngstown.. 

Totals .... 


Wearmouth, Thomas 
Whitebreast Fuel Co. 


2 
12 














Table sliowiitg the Nature of In juries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Time JLost, with Averages and Percentages— Tliird 
District. 



Nature of In.icries. 



Backs injured 

Bodies injured 

Head injured 

Legs broken 

Legs injured 

Ribs broken 

Totals, averages and percentage 




2j.. 




5 


1 .. 


"2 


" 


2l . . 




9 


2!.. 




6 



Time 


Lost. 


"o^ 






fi-2 


Total 


Aver- 


S5 


days. 


age 
days. 


1^ 


140 


46.2 


25 


42 


21 


16.& 


13 


13 


8.4 


125; 


62.1 


16.& 


32| 


16 


16.9 


871 


43.1 


16.9 



136 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Brown County — Third District — 1898. 



Name of (Operator. 



Description. 



Hill 



2=2 



Output. 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 
of lump. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



.Jerry O'Neil 

Douglas McCIure 

Charles Danlap 

H. Cronicle 

Samuel Baily 

Geo. Ashbacker 

T. F. Lewis 

John Adams 

Thomas Brady 

Barney Ridder 

T. Redmond & Bros.. 

A, Murschhauser 

Q. Griflith 

F. Samuels 

Jake Fredlin 

Daniel Flinn 



Totals... 
Averages. 



Ripley 40 

Mt. Sterling..! 40 
40 
40 
I 40 
1 40 
I 40 
I 40 
Damon....] 



Mt. Sterl'g 



Daisey J 



* Surface strippings. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 13. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 16. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



137 



Brown County, 1898 — Concluded. 



Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 



&3 






i ^ 



Price paid per 
screened ton. 



^ I 



g 




Aoci* 




•d 


den's 








a 
































^ 


&: 






^ 


8, 




• 








-£ ' 




O 




=£ 










>. 


fcn 














Q 


t4 


fe 


55 1 



Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 



$1 50 
1 50! 
1 50i 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50j 
1 50 



S300 
262 
150 
150; 
210 
195 
180 
2621 



$1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 



138 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Fulton Coiinhj— Third District— 1898. 











Description. 


Output. 




1 


1 


53 

a 


r. 
"3 


^ i 

s i 




1 

1 
1 




Name of Operator. 


Postofifiee. 




en O 


^ 









cS 


Total 


I Tons 


g 






D 


I- 


la 

il 





.a 


. 


'0 

i 


tons pro- 
duced. 


of lump. 


01 
other 
grade s^ 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 


Whitebreast F. Co.. C 
D 

Carbon Coal Co 

Astoria Coal & M. Co. 
Sunday Cr'k Coal Co.. 
W.L.Pieree&Co..less. 
Farraington Coal Co. . 
PindleyC. & C. Co... 
J. M. Laws 


Dunfermline . 

St. David 

Astoria 

Middle Grove. 
Farmington... 

Monmouth.... 
Cuba 


90 
60 
50 
70 

106 
85 

145 
67 
80 
80 
70 
30 
50 
80 
60 
70 
60 
60 
50 
45 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
40 
40 
40 
30 
75 
35 
30 
35 
30 
30 
40 
+ 
45 
40 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
40 
50 
50 

112 
20 
55 
50 
50 
45 
45 
40 
45 
45 


5 

5 

5 

5.6 

4 

il 

•i 

4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 
4.6 

2.4 
2.6 

2:4 

' 2.6 
2.6 

4.6 

2.4 
4.0 
4.6 

4 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 
5 


Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 

!/; 
%■ 

SI. 
D. 

Sh. 
D. 

D. 

Sh. 

D. 

Sh 


S. 

Ho. 
S. 
Ho. 

lo. 

" 

:] 

s. 

Ho. 


B. 

:: 

" 

M. 
B. 

M. 

R 


142.302 

61.817 

20.762 

54.597 

47,072 

30.887 

31,331 

12,226 

16, 772 

13,750 

23,700 

7,870 

28,700 

14,318 

600 

1,250 

1,435 

1,025 

880 

1,000 

870 

850 

700 

600 

550 

625 

415 

400 

375 

175 

183 

120 

400 

3:042 

1,430 
480 

3,500 
400 
200 

1,806 
250 
200 

2,300 
280 
480 
240 
240 
800 
240 
750 
525 

7,720 
300 
425 
180 
370 
200 
368 
100 
350 
300 


107,206 
44,416 
14.423 
35,804 
31,382 
24, 176 
23.824 

9.526 
16.772 
10,100 
16,700 

7,870 

22, 700 

14,318 

600 

1,250 

1,435 

1,025 
880 

1.000 
870 
850 
700 
SOO 
550 
625 
415 
400 
375 
175 
IHO 
120 
400 

2.980 

3,042 

1,430 
480 

3. 000 
400 
200 

1,806 
250 
200 

1,700 
280 
480 
240 
240 
700 
240 
750 
525 

7, 720 
300 
425 
ISO 
370 
200 
368 
100 
350 
300 


35.096 
17.401 
6.339 
18,793 
15.690 
6.711 
7,507 
2,700 


10 
11 


Taylor & Peck 

P. W. Meehan 


Galesburg.... 

Breeds 

Galesburg.... 
Canton 

St. David.;:::: 

Lewistown. . . . 
Astoria. 


3.650 
7,000 


v 


Cline & Shaw 




is 

16 
17 

18 
19 

fr 


Canton Union C. Co.. 

Canton Coal Co 

H. W. Stickler 

Thomas Parcell 

Wages & Murphey . . . 

Louis Memmon 

P. Linden & Son 

Peck &McClure 

Charles Scanlon 

John iNi^artin. 


6.000 


23 
24 
*>5 


Solenberger & Tygret 
Charles Minuet 




26 

?7 


Michael Timothy 




•'S 


John Fuller . 




?9 






SO 


Wm. Jordan 




31 
32 
33 


Wm. Shryock 

Thomas Courtney.... 
L. R. Snyder 




34 
35 


Lowry&K. (lessees).. 




36 


Isaac Bath 




37 

SS 


Wm. H. Chapman.... 
T. H. Jarvis 


500 


39 


L. Hoops 


Breeds.:...:.: 
Cuba 


2 D. 

5 Sh. 


Hd i M. 




40 


■Tohn Perry 


Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 

1^ 

Hd 


B. 

M. 

B. 
B. 
M. 
B. 

" 

M. 
B. 




41 


W. Willick 




42 
43 


Thomas Ewing 

Wxxj Suggett 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
6 
6 

6 


SI. 

" 

1: 
I'- 

Sh. 

n 






Bartlett & Bradley. . . 

John Hamilton 

George Marshall 

John Steven's 


600 


4'i 






46 






47 






48 








49 
50 
51 
52 
63 
54 


David Nappin 

Elijah Webster 

George Endres 

Albert Eyman 

T.Parcell&Co. (lessee) 
Martin & Straley 


Farmington.. 

Lewistown — 
Norris 


100 


55 


Middle Grove. 

Breeds 

Banner 


5 " 




56 
57 
58 
59 


Menzo Morse 

Lewis Loopman 

Wm. Pennell 


6 
5 


•• 




60 
61 

62 


L. S. Sprague 

John Williams 

Charles Snyder 


5' 





+ Strip mine. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



13<> 



Fulton County, 1808 — Continued. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 


a 

_o 




Acci- 
d'nts 






S,<b 




. 


! 
11 

II 


o 






.i >i 


a 


■s 










II 

II 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


of 

OP 


1 

1 

s 3 


p. 
S 

3 

'o 


Price paid 
per gros-s ton. 


as 

It 

m 

■la 


o 

1 
'o 

1 


<V 
1 

"o 




S 


Capacity 


1 

a 


a 
.a a 


a 

o£ 


mine- 
tons. 


'Z 


o3 




12; 


^ 


< 


c-i 


fc 


ti. ! Dh 


o\ W 


5m 


•z 




1 $1 03 


$133,936 


173 


48 


23 


244 


$0 45* 


SO 31 


R-M, 


174 


4,584 


1 


1 


200,000 


2 


1 11 


56,314 


82 


19 


IC 


111 


45 








110 


1,981 


..1 1 


100,000 


3 


1 00 


16.007 


55 


g 


10 


73 


45 








110 


706 


.. 1 


60, OOO 


4 


1 19 


51,251 


65 


10 


6 


81 


45 








232 


1,39;i 




90,ooa 


5 


86 


28,714 


55 


10 


7 


72 


45 








1.54 


2, IOC 


■^ 


72,000 


tJ 


1 00 


25,853 


70 


6 


6 


82 


45 








ISO 


2,60(i 


1 


75,000 


7 


1 00 


25.700 


49 


10 


8 


67 


45 








125 


1,465 


..' 1 


100,000= 


8 


92.5 


9,712 


14 


3 


a 


20 


45 








150 


411 




40,000 


'J 


SO 


13, 417 


25 


4 


5 


34 


45 








ISO 


44^ 


• i • 


30,000 


10 


1 00 


11,925 


33 


2 


2 


37 


45 








140 


4,5(1 


! 


30,000 


n 


90 


17, 130 


32 


9 


3 


37 


45 








2(HI 


,soo 


..1, .. 


40,000 


12 


1 25 


9,837 


15 


2 


1 


18 


45 








200 


10(1 


..!.... 


12.000 


13 


1 00 


25, 100 


32 


3 


2 


37 


45 








210 


9.5(1 


1|.... 


40,000 


U 


1 00 


14,318 


15 


1 


2 


IS 


65 








200 


475 


1 


20,000 


16 


1 00 


600 


3 




1 


4 


60 








KMI 


3(1 


..!.... 


1.800 


l(i 


1 00 


1,250 


4 




1 


5 


60 








1,50 


45 


( 


2.50O 


17 


1 00 


1,435 


4 






4 


60 








r5 


72 


] 


2,500 


18 


1 00 


1,025 


3 




1 


4 


60 








170 


.50 






1,800 


19 1 00 


880 










60 








mo 


46 






1,200 


20 1 00 


1,000 


3 




1 


4 


00 








125 


50 






2,500 


21 1 00 


870 


3 






3 


60 








145 


4? 






1,800 


22, 1 00 


850 
700 


3 
3 






3 
3 


60 
60 








140 


40 
35 






1 800 


23 


1 00 






1,600 


?A 


1 00 


600 


3 






3 


60 








m 


30 






1,600 


?5 


1 00 


550 


2 








60 








130 


30 






1,200 


2« 


100 


625 


3 






?. 


60 








1V0 


33 






1.60O 


CT 


1 00 
1 00 


415 
400 


2 




1 


3 
2 


60 
60 








100 
115 








1,2G0 


28 


• 


?5 






1,000 


29 


100 


375 








2 


60 








110 


23 






1,000 


30 


1 00 


275 


I 






1 


60 








SO 


10 






600 


31 


1 00 


180 


1 






1 


60 








SO 


10 






60O 


3' 


1 00 
100 
1 12.5 
125 


120 

400 

3,352 

3,802 


1 

1 
5 
4 






1 


60 
60 
90 
60 








70 
200 
300 
200 


7 
22 
100 
1,52 






600 


33 






600 


S-J 






3 000 


35 


1 


2 


. . 1 


4,000 


3(i 


125 
1 00 
125 


1,787 

480 

4,000 


5 

3 
5 




1 


i 

7 


87.5 
87.5 
45 




; 




270 
125 
250 








2,000 


37 








1,000 




1 


1 


.50 






4,000 


j^ 


110 
1 10 
1 10 
1 00 

87.5 
85 


440 
220 

1,986 
250 
175 

1,565 


2 
2 
3 
2 
1 
4 






I 

1 
5 


86.5 

87.5 

60 

45 

45 

45 








180 
70 

200 
65 

85 








70O 


40 












SOO 


41 






40 
5 

s 


;; 




2.400 


4-' 






1 OOO 


43 








44 




1 


200 7o 


3,000 


45 


75 

75 

75 

75 

1 25 

1 25 

1 25 

1 25 

1 00 


210 
360 
180 
180 
725 
300 
937 
656 
7.720 


1 

1 
4 
2 
5 
2 
10 






1 

1 
1 
5 

5 

IS 


45 
45 
45 
45 

75 
75 
75 
70 
45 






^ 


85 7 
125 16 
125 8 
125 S 


•• 


.... 










1,100 


47 




.. . 


550 








550 


49 




1 


150 
100 
100 
185 
170 




1,600 


en 








SOO 


.51 


j 1 






2,000 










800 


53 


2 


6 


300 






12,000 


54 


100 

1 00 

100 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

90 

90 

90 


300 
370 

i 


2 
2 

1 
2 
1 

1 
2 






i 

1 
1 

I 

2 


75 
70 
65 
65 
65 
65 
60 
60 
60 








80j 

120 16 
lOol 8 
125 U 


:: 




l.OOO 


55 








1,100 


5« 






1 • 


550 


57 






....... 


1,100 


,58 










200 

168 




300 


59 








v> 


■■E 


SOO 


6(1 






i • 


60l 5 
120: 12 
100 12 


500 


61 




80O 


62 


::::::l:::::: 


900 



Price paid per gross ton; all others are prices per screened ton. 



140 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



Fulton County— Third District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


PostolRce. 


Description. 


Output. 


3 

-D 

a 
:5 


4^ 

<1> 

T 
1 

o 

1 


eg 


a 

3 

a 

1^ 


o 

P. 


a 
o 

h 
1- 


i 

3 

o 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tea, 

Other 
grades 


€3 

64 
fi5 


R. E. Gould & Co 

John Abbdusky 

Dan Williams 


Pairview 

;; 

Avon....!"!!! 


50 
50 
55 

i 

40 
30 

20 

30 
30 
35 
35 
40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
30 
50 
30 
30 

100 
40 


4 

5 

5 

5 

4 

5 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

3.6 

3 6 

2.4 

2.4 

2.4 

i:l 

2.4 


6 
5 
5 
2 
2 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

1 

1 
2 
2 


D. 

SI. 

D. 

1 


Hd 
1' 


M. 
B. 

M. 

B. 
M. 

B, 

M. 


1.207 
700 
320 

1.400 
900 

1.000 
250 
280 
300 
250 
320 
350 
200 
200 
.280 
150 
100 
400 
350 
380 
290 
* 3,460 
650 
300 
350 


700 
320 

1.400 
9O0 

1.000 
250 
280 
300 
250 
320 
350 
200 
200 
280 
150 
100 
400 
350 
380 
290 

3,460 
650 
300 
350 




fifi 


Thomas Caldwell 

Henry Walton 

Robert Rodis & Son . . 

Brown & Murray 

G. W. Offord 




€7 

68 


Prairie City . . 
Ipava 




70 


Marrietta 

Leaman 

New Phila'pa! 
Vermont 

Table Grove!! 
Dunfermline . 




71 


R. Welsh 




7f1 


S. Keppell 




73 


H. Havins . 




74 






75 


W. Foraker .. 




76 

77 


Theo. Anderson 

W. Anderson . 




78 
79 
80 


Anderson & Miller... 

G. N. Kerstetter 

R.Bladffpn 




81 


Joseph Clark. . 




82 
S3 


Gepr& Rirkbride .... 
Witchell Bros . .. 




84 


K K. Johnson 

J. W. Willis &Co 




85 
86 


Sh. 
D. 


s 

Hd 


B. 
M. 




87 


Wm. Fiddler. 






Totals .... 












563.397 


435,310 


128 087 




Averages.. 




















! 


















* This coal was brought from various strip mines and shipped at Vermont. 

t Strip mines. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 82. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 17. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 12. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 87. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 

Fulton County, i8P8— Concluded. 



141 





Values. 


Emplote.S. 


Wages. 


a 
.2 


? 




1 


Aoci- 

den's 






^6 
2a 

II 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

profiuct. 


a 

a* 

a 
S 


a 

If 




M 


1 
w 

_o 
P. 

a 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 


i 

£2 




"3 


55 


Capacitj- 
of 
mine- 
ton .«. 


1 

a 






G;i 


SI 00 
1 00 

1 DO 
1 75 
1 75 
1 25 
1 25 
] 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
125 
125 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 00 
100 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 00 
1 75 
1 50 
1 00 


SI, 207 
700 
320 
2,450 
1,575 
1,250 
312 
350 
375 
312 
400 
437 
250 
250 
350 
187 
100 
400 


4 

3 
2 
5 
4 






4 

1 
5 
4 
3 

2 

3 
3 
1 

1 

1 
1 
2 

2 
5 
3 


$0 CO 

60 

60 

1 25 

1 25 

00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

100 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 

60 

60 

1 00 

1 00 

1 00 


;::::::: 


S.,M. 

•• 


180 
140 
100 
230 
220 
170 
150 
100 
100 
100 
100 
120 
200 
200 
120 
140 

60 
150 
150 
180 
150 
144 
250 
140 

50 








1,400 
900 
1,800 
1,200 
1,800 
500 
800 
700 
700 
900 
800 
300 
300 
600 
300 
500 
800 
700 
600 
600 


ti4 






24 
13 


;: 




60 






m 






67 










m 


3 






32 






69 


2 

2 
3 

3 
1 

1 

1 






70 












71 

72 
73 


;.;;;; 






;; 




74 













7,S 












76 






77 












78 












7H 


\ 






5 
16 






80 






81 


475.' 2 






82 












8a 


362 

3,460 

1,137 

450 

350 


3 
2 












84 












8i) 






i 06 

1 00 
60 


::;e 








800 

600 

1,500 


86 












87 




1 











SI. 02. 9 


$501,4^3 


901 


132 


lOG 

1 


1, 139 






20,001 


3 


7 


1,007.050 






t 


$0.31 


1 


144 










1 



+ Average price per screened ton, 71.6 cents. 



J42 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Hancock Comity — Third District — 189S. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 
i 


1 

§ 
o 

Q 


1 

11 


1 

a 

tugs 


o 
o 

/a 

02 


a 

o 

1 


1 

1 

a 


Total m._. 


Ton, 

other 

grades 


1 


Merideth Bros 

Highland & Marks... 
M F Ray 


Augusta 


60 
30 
30 
30 


2.6 
2.6 
2.6 
2.6 


2 
2 
2 


Sh. 


H„. 


M. 


4,200 
250 
350 
800 


4,200 
250 
350 
SOO 




4 


Wm. Courtney 

Totals 






1 


5.600 


5.600 








1 


. 












" 



















Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 4. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 4. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



14,^ 



Hancock County, 1898 — -Concluded. 





Values. 




Employes. 


1 Wages. 




.2 




j Acci- 
1 d'nts 


















2 

■a; 


S 








S.S 1 


s 


!3 


J) i 




Price paid per 


■^>> 


1 ] 
1 1 






2 S ' 




:r. 


- 




screened ton. 


X 1' 








Capacity 




flj ' 




"j' 




»2 






:" 


-a 




of 




o-= Agsreg-ate 


4J 


O . 


^ 


>. 






■Z 


? 




mine— 




. ^ value 


." 


P.A 




— 


~ 1 c 


■So 


)i 


^ 


1 1 


tou.s. 




~~ of total 


ff 


S 3 


— . 


? -.. ! ^. 


a >> 




' ■ ~ 






H ~ ' product. 


■x: 


.u 


""2 i 


S ' ^5f 1 i^ 


^s 


o 


^ 


■ ! '^ 






>s i 






S5 
— 2 1 


otal 

or 
nini 


S-s 


2§ 
OS a 


:3 


4) 


il 


s 
o 




z, 


<^ i 


SS^ 


o^ 


<^ I 


^ i ^- 


£" 




G 


W 


r- 


^ 




1 


SI 35! .$5,670 


U 




^1 


161 SO 93 




W. 


200 




i 1 


6, COO 


2 


1 751 438 


2 




il 


31 1 00 






IOC 




i..i.... 


600 


8 


1 75 612 


4 




i; 


5 1 00 




. 


S( 






SOO 


4 


1 75| 1. 400 


5 




1! 


6| 1 00 




•' 


140 




1.. 


.... 


1.2C0 






S8. 120 


. 




5! 

1 


30 














S,600 




$1 45 


$0 94.7 






130 




i 







i 














1 I 





144 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Knox County — Third District — 189S. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoflice. 


Description. 


Output. 


c 

a 

s 
55 


1 
1 

o 

.a 

Q 


1 

h 


s 

a 

So; 

_c ■'■ 


•c 
-a 

o 

02 


•a 
a 

1 
o 
9 
u 
o . 

II 


'6 

3 
o 

1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 


George W. Essex 

Eos'* & Woodw^rd ... 
Reid & Penderga.st... 

Albnrt Wertsen 

G. W. Oorsepius 

•lames MeGovern 

George Clifford 

Charles Morgan 

Bank«ton Bros 

Taylor Bros 

N E. Anderson 

.lohn .lacobsou & Son 

Peter Linheck 

Louis Nordeen 


Soperville.... 
Galesburg. ... 
Soperville.... 
Galesburg. ... 

Oneida.....;;; 
Wataga 

;; ;;;;;;;; 

Knoxviiie .... 

Williarasfieid. 
Etherley 


113 
50 
!I3 
40 
30 
20 
20 
30 
30 
30 
20 
30 
30 
45 
30 
40 
30 
30 
40 
40 
45 
45 
45 
45 


L 

2.6 
2.H 
2.6 


P 
6 
6 
6 
(5 
6 

6 
6 
6 

2 

6 
6 

i 

6 
6 

6 

I 


Sh. 

SI. 
D. 

SI. 

Sh. 

D. 

SI. 
Sh. 

!). 

SI. 
D. 

Sh 


8. 

Ho. 

Hd. 
Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 

Hd. 

Ho. 

Hd. 

S 


B. 
M. 


9,500 
3.720 
3,580 
1,800 

370 
2,306 
2,706 

400 
4,360 
3,000 
4,064 

700 

"400 
388 
100 
120 
120 
175 
750 
120 
320 

1,280 
320 
750 
640 
600 
240 


9.500 

3,720 

3. 58*! 

1.800 

370 

2,306 

2,706 

400 

4.360 

3,000 

4,064 

700 

880 

800 

570 

1,6.50 

1,600 

250 

1,240 

400 

388 

100 

120 

120 

175 

7o0 

120 

320 

1.2H0 

320 

750 

640 

600 

240 


::::;;;; 


16 


•lames Nelson 

Z P Dndlev 




IS 


( )]jfi Walhurg 






John Welsh 




20 
21 
22 


Lundeen & Priest — 

Edward Crozier 

Edward Peterson 




'M 


A P Boyer 




25 

2K 


Edward Boyer 

loseph Thompson 




45 
45 
30 




28 


S. A. Westfall 


Yates City;;.. 
Appleton 

Elmwood 

Farmington . . 


30 
50 
25 
25 
25 
30 
30 




'10 




61 SI. Hd. 




31 
32 

34 


Eric Herkstrom 

Erlinger & Brown — 

Wm. Andres 

Wm- Raffle & Son .... 

Totals 


6! " 
6Sh. 

61 •• 
6| " 


" 










49, 819 


49.819 






























" 






















Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 29. 
Number of new mines opened during the year. 11. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, ' 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 34. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Knox County, iS^S— Concluded. 



145 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


a 
.2 



1 


>, 


- 

-a 
1 

© 


ACCT- 

DEN'e 






0,4) 

a.a 

.23 

^1 

3a 

< 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a . 


a 

3 

II 
II 


1 

11 

s at 
< 


1 

P. 

a 

I 


Price paid per 
screened ton. 


is 

a-g 
1^ 






1 


Capacity 


1 

a 


3 

•^ a 

si 


a 

1^ 


of 
mine- 
tons. 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 


$1 25 
1 25 
125 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 50 
1 25 
1 25 
1 12.5 
1 12.5 
125 
1 00 
1 25 
125 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 00 
100 

87.5 

87.5 
1 00 

87.5 
1 00 

87.5 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 
1 00 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 


$11,875 
4.650 
4,4V5 
2,250 
462 
2,882 


20 
10 

7 

6 
4 

7 


1 
1 

:::::: 


2 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


23 
12 

? 

S 

8 


$0 75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 


:::::::: 



:::::::: 


S-M. 

M. 
W. 

S-M. 

,\. 

M. 

S-M. 
M. 

W. 

;: 

:: 


225 
195 
180 
150 
40 
170 
185 
100 
200 
150 
210 
150 
200 
180 
160 
140 
190 
80 
230 
100 
70 
50 
60 
60 
80 
100 


450 . 
125 
125 . 
60. 


. ...^ 


12, 000 
7,000 
7,000 
3,000 
2,500 
4 000 




4,059 7 
500 3 


81 75 
3 75 
lOl 75 




1 










1.200 
6 GOO 


9 


5.450 
3,375 
4,572 

875 

880 
1,000 

712 
2,475 
2,400 

375 
1,240 

400 

339 
87 

120 


.1 

10 

1 

3 
2 
10 
6 
3 
3 
3 
4 
2 
2 


i 

1 


1 
1 






11 


14 
12 
3 
3 

I 
11 


75 

70 

75 

67.5 

75 

7B 

*.5 




■ ' 


6,000 
5,500 
1,400 
1,400 
1.400 
1,000 
9 800 








13 










14 











15 










16 




i 

1 








7 1 00 

8 87.5 

3 75 
3 75 
4I 75 








18 






800 
1.500 
1.200 

i,5oe 

600 
600 
«00 
600 

2,000 
600 

1.000 


19 










20 










21 










22 






2 

2 

4 
2 
3 


75 

75 

75 

75 

62.5 

75 

75 






i 






105 2 
175! 2 
656 4 
120 2 
320 3 










26 










26 










27 










28 






85 
150 






29 


1,600 
320 
750 
800 
750 
300 


\ 


1 


1 


6 75 

3 75 

4 75 

5 75 








80 
110 
100 
100 
JOO 






1.200 
1,800 
1 800 


31 


4 










32 


2 




i 








i; 5; 75 
i| 3[ 75 






1,700 









750 




$1 23 


$61,349 


173 


6 


17 1961 






760|. 


2 


88,650 




... 


$0 75.3 






131 


. 




i 1 1 1 













-10 



146 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 



McDonough County— Third District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


l4 

s 

s 
Z 


1 

T 

o 


1 

Is 

% s 
II 


3 

a 

li 


o 

1 

nil 


a 
o 


1 

% 
c 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


] 

Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
2 
3 

n 


Egrerton Coal Co 

Rippetoe & Rundle... 
Colchester C. &M.Co. 
Peter Whalen 


Colchester.... 

Macomb 

Colchester 



Tennessee 

Blandmsville. 

Industry 


53 

56 
53 
35 
30 
35 
40 
40 
40 
30 
30 
40 
30 
30 
50 
30 
30 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
40 
30 
30 
40 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
40 
40 
4C 
35 
4C 
4C 
4C 
4C 
4C 
4C 
4C 


2.9 
2.9 
2.9 
2.6 
2.6 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2 4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.6 
2.6 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 
2.4 


^ 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 

2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

2 

I 

2 

2 
2 

I 
2 
2 

2 

i 

2 


Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 
SI. 

p. 

i 

D. 

Sh. 

D.' 
81. 
p. 

Sh. 
D. 

ft- 

Sh. 
p. 


Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 

Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 

Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 
Hd 

Ho. 


M. 

:: 


20,000 

16.050 

18, 260 

1,580 

1,200 

6C0 

600 

700 

650 

500 

200 

300 

700 

840 

320 

100 

350 

215 

275 

455 

420 

325 

1,760 

200 

322 

1 

220 
410 
1, 170 
1,055 
100 
300 
210 
400 


18.000 
16.050 
17, 000 
1,580 
1,200 
600 
600 
700 
650 
500 
200 
300 
700 
840 
320 
100 
350 
215 
275 
455 
420 
325 
1,760 
200 
322 
650 
525 

1 220 
410 
1,170 
1,055 
100 
300 
210 
400 

! 200 
400 
350 

I 1, 634 
200 
180 
380 

; 480 
320 
210 
260 
360 
320 
230 
210 

74,436 


2,000 

■■■i:266 


5 


D. B. Sherbine 

Leonas Neece 




7 
8 
q 


William Robison 

William Porter 




10 


\ E Wilson 




11 

12 


William Berry 

Wm. Hodgson 

Amos Abbin 

Wni Kipling 




15 
16 


Newman Foster 

Richard Laity 








18 
19 
20 
21 

09 


George Polonus 

Michael Humes 

John Zimmerman.... 

Wash Entwirtle 

.lohu McCord 




•S 


Hillary Bros 




''I 


Henry Martin 










;26 
27 

■28 
29 
'^0 


Wm. Dickerson 

fjouis Atkinson 

George Carrison 

Wm. Martin 

Baird & Sons 




SI 






^Q 


Isaac Stone 




33 
44 


Hugh McDonald 

Wm. Williams 

\j. H. Vest 




■% 


F M. Haines 




200 




S" 




'[ 


400 

35C 

1.634 

2oe 

18C 
38t 
48C 
32C 
211 
26C 
36C 
32C 
23C 
21C 

77,696 




3S 
^1 


Fergus Whalen 











41 
42 
43 


Joseph Dodges 

Wilson & Poster 

Frank Burdick 









45 


Anthony Reynolds... 
J. Gilligan 


:::::::: 


17 


Dick Jones 




48 
4«1 


Wm. Baker 

Link Wilier 




5C 


Wm. Stoneking 

Totals 


3.260 






























1 












' 





Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 32. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 25. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 50. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



147 



McDonough County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. l 


Employes. 




Wages. 




o 

1 1 

1 

o 
> 

1 

o 

pi 
ea 


D 

1 ~ 
3 

^ i 

1 


i.ccr- 

en's 






a.9 
^a 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 


3 

o 


1 

00 

11 


? i 

>a 1 

O 

P. 

^ i 


*rice paid per 
screened ton. i 


as 
a a 


1 


Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 


-1 


'S5 

«"§ 

■il 

< 


— 9 

O 3 


It 

a '5 

IN 


1 $1 50 

2 1 33 

3 133 
4' 1 50 


S27.400 
21,346 
22,862 
2.370 
1,800 
840 


50 
54 
55 
6 
5 
3 
3 
4 
4 
4 
4 

3 

1 

2 
1 
2 
3 

■A 


1 
1 
1 

1 


5 
5 
5 

1 
1 


56 

IS! 

3 

il 

4! 

4: 
4: 

3! 
4i 

21 

1 

2 
3 
3 
3 
4 

1 

1 
2 

i 
■ 1 

2 

4 
2 
5 
i 
4 
3 

2 
2 
3 
2 

2 


$1 00 

1 00 

100 

1 00 

100 

1 ooi 

1 001 

1 00 

1 00' 


S-M. 


260 
208 
265 
170 
150 
150 
150 
140 
140 
140 
60 
125 
175 
175 
125 
40 
150 
2©0 
100 
125 
120 
120 
220 
100 
200 
200 
120 
120 
140 
245 
240 
80 
140 
130 
150 
100 
100 
140 
200 
140 
110 
200 
160 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
150 
! 150 






24.000 




2 

1 .... 


25.000 
24,000 
2,000 


5 1 50 

6| 1 40 
7 1 40 






2 000 






1,200 










1 200 


8j 1 40 
9 1 40 




1 






1,400 






1,300 








1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 








1,000 


11 1 40 1 'SI 










900 


"12 1 40 


420 
980 
1,176 
448 
140 
490 
268 
343 
568 
588 










600 


n\ 1 40 

14 1 40 










1,100 






1,200 












800 


let 1 40 










600 












600 








1 00 






320 


19 1 '>5 




... 


100 
100 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 


:::::::: 






750 












l.OOfl 


21 1 40 










1,000 




487 'A 










800 


23! 1 25 


2,200 

■ 280 

402 

812 

fiSfi 


4 

3 

■j 

3 
3 
4 

2 










2,090 


24 1 40 










600 












500 


26 1 25 










1,000 


27 1 25 


1 






1,200 


281 1 25 1 275 






. ...1 




600 


29 1 40 ! 574 











900 


30 


1 25 1,468 
1 25 1,318 
1 25 125 










1,400 


31 










1,400 


S' 






j 




400 


33 


1 40 4201 2 
1 40 1 294' 2 
1 40 5601 2 
1 25 250 2 
1 25 500! 4 
1 40 4901 5 










600 


31 






1 00! 






550 


3"i 






100 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
100 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 








700 


3fi 










600 


37 


1 








1,200 


3S 










800 


39 


1 40 2.207 
1 25 1 ''50 


I 5 
3 










2,200 


40 







1 




450 


11 


1 25 
1 25 
150 
1 50 
I 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 


\ m 

720 
480 
315 
390 
54C 
48C 
34.^ 


4 
3 
2 
2 
2 

a 
1 






: 




500 


4' 










500 


43 




1 


800 


44 










700 


M 






1 




600 


46 










550 


47 










700 


48 










650 


49 


[ 




1 




650 


50 


315 : 






1 ' 




500 








j 


l[ 2 






$1 38.5 


$103,602 293' 4 

1 


18 


315 






116, 020 




$1 00 






\r,2 








1 




■ 




1 




1 


1 





148 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 





Schuyler County— 


-Third Distrid- 


-1898. 






Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


i 


1 

T 

o 
o 

o. 

CD 

. o 


1 

l1 


1 

5 

c 

li 


•a 

o 

a. 
o 


1 

o 

II 


I 

o 
d 


Total 1 rr,.„„ 

^reT-|o*"-p- 

1 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 




Rushville 4S 


4 

5 
5 


5Sh. 


St. 
Hd 


B, 

M. 


2,760' 2,760 






William Portwood.... 
William Cunimings.. 
John Hodge 


Ray '.'.'.'. 


38 
38 


5 
5 
5 
2 
2 
2 
5 

2 


Dr. 

St. 
Dr. 


1,890' 1,890 

1.050' 1,050 

1 870 ! 1 870 


5 


A. Winner 

Rnfus Porter. 


50 2.3 
50 2.3 
50 2.3 
10 5 
50! 2.6 
40 2.6 


540! '540 


6 




7401 740 


7 






550' 550 


8 


Hettrick & Wetmore. 


Frederick 


1,484! 1,4841 

225 2251 - 


10 


James Peel 


401 40 






Totals.. 






ll,149i 11.149 






Averages 




























1 







Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 11. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 10. 



Warren Comity— Third District— 1898. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 








« 


.Q 


'S 




-a 


3 


•^ 


P 


o 












© 














O M 


ij 










O 


CO 



Total 

tons pro 

duced. 



Tons 
of lump, 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



Charles F. McCartney 

Cook & Gilmore 

John Sincox 

Redmond & Murphy . 

John Selkirk 

Lafe Smith 

R. Delaney 

Henry Hopkins 

Thomas Wearmouth . 

R. Mace 

B. Lewrance 

Joseph Simpson 

Samuel White 

J. Wilson 

Bryner Bros 

Thomas Lee 



Monmouth 



Totals 



Averages. 



Youngstown 



Swan Creek . 
Roseville — 
Youngstown 



1 Sh 
1 '• 
1: " 



2 Dr. 
2 ■ ' 
2 " 



2; SI. 
2Dr. 

I 



3.100 

2,000 

1,700 

1.250 

1,040 

450 

375 

250 

240 

220 

240 

60 

200 

120 

850 

150 



2.900 

2,000 

1,700 

1,250 

1,040 

450 

375 

230 

240 

220 

240 1 

60 

200 

120 



12,245 



12,045 



Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 14. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 8. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 16. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



149 









Schuyler^ 


County, 


1898- 


—Concluded. 












Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


"it; 

11 

li 


1 
1 

o 


1 

> 
1 


Acci-I 
den's 








Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 

a 

a 

. o 

1^ 


a 

i 

o . 


OS 
1 

o 
a-c 


_o 
"a 
2 

o 


Price paid 

per screened 

ton. 






"5 
1 


3 

"S 

a 
o 


Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 


J 

a 


1 
a 






SI 25 
1 25 
1 12.5 
1 00 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
100 
1 00 
1 25 


$3,450 

2,362 

1,181 

1,870 

675 

925 

686 

1,484 

225 

50 


5 
4 
4 
3 
2 
3 
3 
5 
2 
1 




1 


6 
4 
5 
4 
2 
3 

1 


SO 60 

60 


w. 


230 
100 
100 
240 
170 
180 
150 
150 
100 
40 


150 
50 
75 
70 







6.000 
5.400 


6 

•7 
8 
9 

HO 




1 

1 


55 
60 
65 
75 
75 
75 
90 
90 




3,500 

2,500 

900 












1.200 












1.000 




2 








3.000 






700 










300 






3451 . . 








$1 15.7 


$12,908 


32 





5 


37 








24.500 




SO 63.9 






146 








1 



















Warren County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


1 


Wages. 




1 
§ 

0) 

>• 
1 
"o 

1 


1 

1 

a 

o 

1 


Acci- 
den' s 






0.3J 

a.s 

^a 
« 

iJ 


Aggregate 

\ralue 

of total 

product. 


3 

a . 

Oft 


a 

11 
II 

O 


o 
.a 

i 

= 3 

SO 
~ it 


o 
■ft 

i 

1 


Price paid 

per screened 

ton. 


ii 
It 

11 








1 


i 

a 
1 


Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 


1 

a 


-3 
C 

-= a 
o2 


i 

II 

si 


1 
2 
3 


$1 25 
125 


S3. 725 

2.500 

2,125 

2.187 

1.820 

787 

655 

437 

420 

385 

420 

105 

400 

240 

1.912 

262 


5 
5 
4 
4 
5 
4 
3 
4 
2 

2 

1 
2 
2 
4 
1 




:::::: 


1 

i 

1 


6 

5 
5 
6 
4 
3 
4 

5 

2 

4 

1 


SO 65 

75 

75 
1 12.5 
1 12.5 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 
125 
1 25 
1 25 
1 25 


:::::::: 


S.M. 
W. 


250 
200 
170 
240 
210 
120 
140 

80 
120 
120 
120 

70 
100 

70 
200 
120 


200 
170 
125 






4.000 
3,500 
3.000 
1.500 


5 i i 75 

g 1 1 7t; 








1,500 








800 




1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 
1 75 

1 75 

2 00 
2 00 
2 25 
1 75 












600 


8 












800 











1 


500 


10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 






500 












500 












?50 












550 












480r 












1.200 






1 






400 






495 




1 






$1 52.5 


S18.380 


50 




5 


ss 






20,080 




.. .. 
,S124 






145.6 






1 














i 









150 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation hy Counties- 





M 


NES. 


Products. 


Va 


L,UES. 






1 






. 






i^ti 


p • 
















































County. 




a 


i 


s 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Tons 
shipped. 


ated capac 
sns) of exist 

8. 


e value per 
p at the mi 


_2 
"3 . 




aj 






"A 






1 




inn 


6ca 




s 


Q. 


2^ 


^ 


S 










■^:.s 


2.S 


El 






























i5 


02 


^1^ 


<J 










H-'C 


<* 


<*' 




Ifi 




16 


3 




1,940 


1,940 




7.600 


$1 50 


$2,909' 


Fulton 


87 


16 


71 


17 


12 


563,397 


435,310 128,087 


492,599 


1.007.050 


1 02.9 


501,423 


Hancock.... 


4 


1 


3 






5,600 


5,600 


4,200 


8,600 


1 45 


8, 120 




84 




84 


11 


6 


49,819 


49,819| 




88,650 


1 23 


61. 349 


McDonough 


50 


3 


47 


25 


7 


77,696 


74, 436! 3, 260 


52, 460 


116,020 


1 38.2 


103, 602 


Schuyler ... 


10 


1 


9 




1 


11, 149 


ll,149j 


540 


24.500 


1 15.7 


12,908 


Warren 


16.. 


16 


8 


6 


12,245 


12,045 200 




20,080 


1 52.5 


18,380 


Totals .... 


217 


21 


196 


64 


32 


721.846 


590,299J 131.547 


549.799 


1.272.500 




$708,691, 


Averages.. 














1 






$1 10.8 














! 1 1 







Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 185. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 64. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 32. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 217. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



151 



Third District— 1898. 



Employes. 


if 

>1 


S3 

1 

•i ■ 

ll 


Casua 


LTIES. 


Wages. 


Machines. 


i 


u 
o 

ll 


>> 

3 



1 

3 


3 


i 


■a 




Average price paid 
per screened ton. 


c 

as 

It 




2 

a 
as 

p a 


a 


B 

a 

.a 

a 

s 


For 

hand 

mining. 


For 
machine 
mining. 


1 

k 


28l 


28 

1, 139 

30 


96 
144 






1 




$100 
* 71.6 
94.7 
75.3 
1 00 
63.9 
92.4 










901 
25 


238 
5 
23 


20,001 


3 


7 


2 


1 


$0 31 




2 


10,412 


173 


196 131 


7fi0 


1 


2 


1 


1 










293 


1 1 
3151 1,52 










32 


5| 37 146| 345 
5 55I Ufii 495 










50 





1 




























1 ,502 


298| 1,800 

1 


! 21.601 


4 


\'> 


3 


2 








2 


10,413 




135 






$0 83.4 


$0 31 




t 1 



















■ Average price paid for mining 503,496 gross tons in Fulton county, 45 cents per ton. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 153 



FOURTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1^98. 

Counties: Cass, Log-an, Mason, McLean, Menard, Tazewell, Vermilion. 
John E. Williams, Inspector. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretanj, 

State Biircmi of Labor Statistics, Springfield, Illinois: 

Sir: — Statutory provision makes it obligatory upon the State Inspector of 
Mines to keep a detailed record of his services during the year, and to trans- 
mit the same to you in the form of an annual report. I herewith have the 
honor to submit the fifteenth annual report for the Fourth Inspection District 
for the fiscal year ending July 1, 1898. This report gives tabulated state- 
ments, by counties, of the number of mines operated during the year, giving 
the number of miners and other employes, the total output of all grades of 
coal, the average value of coal at the mine and the aggregate value of the 
total product, the number of shipping mines and of those operated for local 
trade only, the casualties in and around the mines, the average number of 
days of active operations, the quantity of powder used, the number of 
machines in use and the amount of coal cut bj^ such machines, the estimated 
capacity of existing mines, assuming that they are operated full time: also, 
the geological number of each seam of coal. 

I would suggest that there be a thorough revision of the present mining 
law, as the present one is ambiguous, contradictory, and defective in many 
respects. I desire to say that I have been very ably assisted in the perform- 
ance of my duties in \'ermilion county by the assistance of Mr. Daniel Reese, 
the county inspector of Vermilion county. He has faithfully carried out my 
instructions, and, as a result, the mines are in a safer and better sanitary 
condition than ever before. I am pleased to say that so far I have not been 
compelled to resort to litigation to enforce a compliance with the law. On the 
contrary, I have beeu treated very courteously by the miners and operators 
■alike. Any suggestion I saw fit to offer for the health and safety of the 
workmen has been generally very readily complied with. 

Abandoned Mines. — Mine No. 1 of the Kelly ville Coal Company, which is sit- 
uated midway between Westville and (h-ape Creek, on the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois Railroad, was worked out and abandoned the 1st of May. 1808. 

Mine No. 4 at Grape Creek, the property of the Grape Creek Coal and Coke 
Company, which has been in litigation for a number of years, was leased to 



154 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Perry Jumps, who operated it until April 20, 1898, when it was found un- 
profitable and abandoned. 

A small mine situated near East Peoria, in Tazewell county, and operated 
by Samuel Becker for local trade, was abandoned early in the spring of 1898. 

Mine No. 4 at Tiltou, in Vermilion county, which was owned by the Con- 
solidated Coal Company, became immdated with water during the excessive' 
wet weather last spring. A strenuous and persistent effort was made to free 
the mine of water, so that it might be continued in operation. After the ex- 
penditure of a good deal of time and a large amount of money the water was 
removed, but it was found that from three to four feet of sediment had col- 
lected on the floor of the mine throughout the whole interior, which would 
require a vast sum of money to clean up, and, as the mine was about worked 
out any way, it was deemed best to abandon it. The miners' tools and a large 
amount of "'T" iron track were lost. 

Escapement Shafts.— The Little Coal and Commission Company, which 
operates a mine near Wesley, in Tazewell county, has sunk an escape shaft 
110 feet in depth, which is connected with the hoisting shaft and is equipped 
with stairs, as required by law. All the miners enter and leave the mine 
through the escape shaft. 

The East Peoria Coal Co. has completed its escape shaft and greatly im- 
proved the ventilation by discarding the furnace and placing a twelve-foot fan 
over the air shaft. 

Messrs. Doering & Bort, who operate a small mine for local purposes at 
East Peoria, after considerable difficulty, have completed their escape shaft. 

E. C. Sloan, lessee of a new mine at Hawley's station, four miles south of 
Pekin, has sunk a new escape shaft 100 feet in depth, and otherwise impioved 
the mine by placing automatic gates over the shaft at the top landing, putting 
bonnets on the top of the cages, also safety catches to the same, and putting 
a brake upon the drum. 

The Brookside Coal Co. has connected the new No. 2 mine at Grape Creek 
with their escape shaft. This mine is ventilated with a small fan located in- 
side the mine and operated by electricity, which produces a good current of 
air for the size of the fan. but will be found insufficient after the mine is more 
fully developed. 

TheKellyville Coal Co. has placed the necessary hoisting machinery over the 
escape shaft at the No. 3 mine, at Westville, so that the workmen can be 
taken out there should it become necessary to do so. 

Alfred C. Blake, who operates a small mine at East Peoria, has put steps in 
his escape shaft as required by law: also put bonnets and safety catches on 
the cages. 

The Himrod Coal Company, which operates one of the largest and best 
equipped mines in the State, is now engaged in sinking a new escape shaft, 
which, when completed, will be the largest in the State, being 10x17 feet in 
the clear, divided into two compartments, one of which will be 10 feet square 
and will be used for an air shaft. A thirty-foot fan will be placed over this 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 155 

compartment to produce the ventilation. The other compartment will be 
ecjuipped with the necessary hoisting machinery and will be used solely for 
the escape of men in times of danger. 

Millard Bros., of Peoria, have reopened the old slope at Wesley City, which- 
has been idle for several years. The product of this mine is loaded on the- 
Peoria & Pekin Union cars and shipped to Peoria and the northwest. 

Old Mine Reopened. — A corporation known as the Illinois Coal Mining Com- 
pany began operations in December, 1897, to reopen the old cooperative coal 
mine, situated one mile west of the Union depot in Bloomington. Several 
years ago a company of miners sunk the shaft to seam No. 6 of the geological, 
section, finding that seam at a depth of 300 feet. It is nearly four feet thick,.. 
but of an inferior quality, and is overlaid with a poor roof. The enterprise 
proved unprofitable, and after a short period of operation the plant was aban- 
doned and has remained so for twelve years. The present parties, in attempt- 
ing to reopen the mine, encountered a great deal of difficulty, as a large 
amount of the curbing had become broken, letting the sides of the shaft cave 
in badly, which rendered it a dangerous as well as a costly undertaking. On 
May 1, 1S98, they finally reached seam No. 5, which is 85 feet deeper than the 
one formerly worked. The coal is of superior quality and is overlaid with a 
splendid black slate roof. It is being opened on the long-wall system, for 
which i1 is admirably adapted, and, in the meantime, sinking will be continued 
to the seam still below the present one. The shaft will then have a depth of 
540 feet and will have two workable seams of coal; the upper is four feet 
thick and the lower one three feet. Both seams will be developed at the same 
time. A splendid tower has been erected, which is designed to handle a large 
output, and is equipped with a pair of direct-acting engines, 18x36 inches,, 
coupled to an 8-foot drum. Steam is generated by two two-flue boilers of a 
large pattern. Railroad facilities are had by a switch leading to the Big Four- 
Railroad. A spur could be easily had from the Kansas City division of the- 
C. & A. R. R., as the mine lies half way between that road and the Big Four. 
Mr. John Marland, an old and experienced manager, who owns stock in the- 
mine, is the superintendent. The machinery was built in Danville and gives 
splendid satisfaction. 

Fatal Accidents. — There have been 19 fatal accidents in this district during 
the past year, and following is a detailed account of each : 

August 11, 1897, LaFayette Taylor, a miner, single, aged 20 years, employed 
by the (^ass County Coal Company, Virginia, was killed while engaged in 
cleaning an entry near the bottom of the shaft. A large fall of roof caught 
him, breaking his neck and back. This mine had been shut down about nine 
months. The deceased was engaged in opening it up. 

August 23, 1897, Christian Chittick, top-man, mai'ried, aged 53 years, em- 
ployed by the Cass County Coal Company, Virginia, fell down the shaft and 
was instantly killed. The deceased pushed an empty car to the shaft and 
followed it through the gate; the car caught on the top of the guides and 
hung there; afterwards he came from the dump, going to the wrong side o£ 



156 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

the shaft where there was no cage; the gate being open, he and the car fell 
to the bottom. He leaves a widow and six children, four of whom are de- 
pendent. 

October 5, 1897, Andrew Killibrew. colored, machine helper, aged 38 years, 
was employed by the Himrod Coal Company, at their mine in Westville. 
While engaged in moving a machine he was struck by a fall of roof and sus- 
tained such serious injuries as to result in his death on the 11th of the same 
month. He leaves a widow, but no children. 

October 28, 1897, at about 5:15 p. m., Toney Potts was killed by a shot of 
■coal in room No. 9, in the fourth east entry, at the Pawnee mine of 
the Himrod Coal Company, Westville. Potts' roommate, Powell Vanseo, 
says that while he was putting tools and oil in the box, Potts went into the 
room to fire, and very soon afterward the shot went off. On entering the 
room he found Potts lying down with blood running from him. 

November|6, 1897, Frank Hieks, timberman, married, aged 38, employed by the 
Tallula Coal Companj', Tallula, for nearly six years, and regarded as a very 
careful man, was killed. Deceased went into the back east entry off the first 
north in the morning, to put up a cross-bar near the face of the entry to catch 
a loose rock; he had carefully examined nnd sounded the rock befoi'e he com- 
menced to work at it. The entry-man. Nelson P. Osterberg, had put up a 
piece of 2x4 with a prop under the north end of it, for his personal safety. 
Hicks commenced to cut a hole on the south rib to put a bar alongside of the 
2x4, when the roof suddenly gave way and fell, crushing him so badly that he 
expired at 5 p. m. The accident happened at about 9:30 a. m. 

There was a large smooth slip commencing near the center of the road and 
extending to the north rib and back near the face of the entry. There was a 
horse-back on the north rib, just where the clod fell. The entry-man says he 
did not notice any slip before the roof fell. James Hutton worked in the ad- 
joining entry and was the second man to reach deceased after the accident; 
his statements were corroborative of the above. The mass of clod which fell 
was about 15 inches thick, 6 feet wide and 7 feet long. Deceased leaves a 
widow and five children, two of whom are old enough to care for themselves. 

December 18, 1897, Jacob Rappe, a miner, aged 25 years, married, employed 
at the mine of the Citizen's Coal Company, at Lincoln, was instantly killed, 
at noon, by a blast of coal. He had lighted a shot at the same time that the 
party working in the adjoining room did; after hearing the report of a shot, 
which he believed was his own. he started into the room, intending to light a 
second shot. Just as he reached the face of his room, the first shot exploded, 
killing him instantly. He was a native of Germany and leaves an invalid 
widow and two small children dependent. 

December 22, 1897, John Erickson, a miner, 45 years of age, single, em- 
ployed at the No. 2 mine of the Kellyville Coal Co., at Westville, was killed by a 
fall of coal. Deceased and his partner were engaged in mining off a standing 
:shot when they both realized their danger and desisted for a time: afterwards, 
Erickson concluded to try it again, notwithstanding the protest of his part- 
ner. He had hardly started to work when the mass of coal suddenly gave 
way, catching him so as to cause death. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 157 

December 23, 1897, Johu NelsoD, a topman, aged 38 years, married, and em- 
ployed by the McLean County Coal Co., Bloomington, was instantly killed by 
falling to the hard frozen ground from the trestle work that extends from the 
shaft to the engine chutes. Deceased was engaged in moving a ear of coal 
when his feet suddenly slipped, causing him to fall. He leaves a widow and 
four children. 

December 29, 1897, at 2:30 p. m., Thomas Biggs, a miner, aged 22 years,- 
single, was killed by a fall of top coal in No. 2 room in the northeast main 
entry of the Himrod Coal Co.'s mine, Westville. He had been warned by the 
machine runner that it was dangerous, about 10 o'clock in the morning. De- 
ceased lived with his parents near the mine. 

January 14, 1898, Harry Miller, married, aged 27 years, employed by the 
Westville Coal Co., Westville, as a night driver, was fatally injured by a fall 
of rock about 10 o'clock at night, on the fourth south entry, east side, near 
room No. IG. Deceased had pulled a ear of rock in.'o the cross-cut be- 
tween the third and fourth south entries, when he discovered that the car 
stood with the wrong end first; he decided to haul it out and unload it some- 
where else, but found that the track was too close to a prop which held up a 
collar, on which rested considerable loose rock. He hunted for an axe to trim 
the prop so the car would pass and not disturb it: he was unable to find an 
axe and decided to take the chance of knocking out the prop, which he did,, 
with the result as stated. He lived until 4 o'clock the next morning. He left 
a widow and one child, from whom he had been separated for some time; 
they are supposed to reside in Peoria. Although perfectly rational all th& 
time after the accident he obstinately refused to divulge the whereabouts of 
any of his relatives. 

February 15, 1898, James Hall, a miner, aged 17 years, working in the mine 
of the Colfax Coal Co., Colfax, was instantly killed by a fall of roof at about 
8:30 a. m. He was working with Charles Campbell, an old and experienced 
miner. Deceased had just begun to mine off a standing shot when the roof 
gave way, crushing him to death. His partner had sounded the roof at that 
place about twenty minutes before the accident and stated that it sounded 
hard and solid. 

March 8, 1898. John Patkus, a miner, single, aged 40 years, while at work 
in mine No. 3 of the Kelly ville Coal Co., Westville, was crushed to death by a 
fall of roof. Deceased had worked in the mines for several years. 

March 23, 1898, John Inglesby, a machine helper, single, aged 28 years, was 
caught by falling coal in the mine of the Westville Coal Co., Westville, at 
about 9 a. m. and was so seriously injured that death resulted in a few hours. 
Deceased neglected to examine or sound the coal face before he began work; 
the machine undercut a large piece of loose coal that fell over on him with 
the result as stated. 

April 29. 1898, Evan Lloyd, a miner, married, aged 38 years, in the employ 
of the Catlin Coal Co., Catliu, was killed in a very singular manner. De- 
ceased and his partner were walking out of the room behind a loaded car, 
which struck a prop which was standing near the track, knocking it out; 



158 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

'this let down a piece of loose rock, catching Lloyd's legs in such a manner 
as to sever one of the main arteries, causing death bj' hemmorrhage. He 
.leaves a widow and four children. 

May 7, 1898, Joseph Riley, colored, single, aged 24, was killed by a fall of 
roof in the mine of the Glenburn Coal Company, Glenburn. Deceased knew 
the rock was unsafe to work under, as he had been warned of the danger by 
several different workmen, but paid no attention to their advice and contin- 
ued to work away without attempting to make himself safe, until the rock 
. gave way and crushed out his life. 

May 12, 1898. Charles Fritz, a miner, single, aged 24 years, was instantly 
killed by a fall of roof in room No. 2, sixth south entry, on the west side, 

• at the mine of the Westville Coal Company, Westville. The accident hap- 
pened at 11:50 a. m. Deceased had been warned by his partner of the dan- 
gerous condition of the roof just a few minutes before it fell, but he replied 
that it would stay up until they could finish loading that car, but in less than 
five minutes the mass of rock let go, crushing him to death. 

June 9, 1898, J. W. Broadbent, a miner, single, aged 53 years, employed in 
the No. 2 mine of the Brookside Coal Company, Grape Creek, was instantly 
killed by a fall of roof at the face of the second room on the first south 
entry, about 2:45 p. m. Thomas BuUough, his fellow workman, stated that 
he notified deceased to keep from under the rock and set up a prop, so as to 
make it safe, but he neglected to do so, when the rock, which was 8 feet long, 
4 feet wide and 3 feet thick, fell on him with the result stated. He had 
worked in coal mines for forty years. 

June 13, 1898, John Schlitzki, a miner, married, aged 28 years, emploj^ed 
by the Westville Coal Company, Westville, was instantly killed at 10 a. m. by 
a fall of rock at the face of room No. 3, on the sixth south entry, east 
side. Deceased had been warned of his danger just a short time prior to 
the accident by the driver and the men who worked beside him, but he paid 
no attention to their friendly advice. He leaves a widow and two children 
in Russia. 

July 29, 1897, Jonathan Twaddle, a timberman, was killed in the mine of 
the Athens Coal Company, at Athens. Deceased and his assistant were en- 
gaged in timbering a bad piece of roof on the main entry, when a small 
piece of soapstone suddenly fell out, without warning, striking him in such 
a manner as to cause death. Deceased was 37 years of age and left a widow 

• and one child dependent. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John E. Williams, 

Inspector Fourth District. 
Danville. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 



15U 



Filial Cdsualties— Fourth Distrid~189S. 




Oct. 



Nov 
Dec 



1897, 
jTily 29 Joiiathau Twaddle.... 137 Timberman. 

Alia:. 11 LaFayette Taylor. 20 ."\liner 

■■ 23 Chris. Cbittick |53 Topman 

SiAndrewKillihrew.. ..iSSMach. help'ri 

28;Toney Potts ;2S SUwr 

6' Frank Hicks ] 38 Timberman. 

IS Jacob Kappe ;25 Miner ■ 

22 John Erickson 145: "' 

" 23'John Nelson 38;Topman 

•• 29iThoraa.s Bisjgs !22iMiner 

1898. ' I ' 

Jan. 14iHarry .Alillcr |27 Driver 

Feb. 15 Janie.'* Hall 17 Miner 

Mar. 8JolmPatkus =10 " 

■• 231 John Inglesby i28:Mach. help'r 

Apr. 29J Evan Lloyd j38! Miner 

May 71 Jos. Riley, colored !24; " 

•• 121 Char le.s Fritz 124! " 

Jnne 9|J. W. Broadbent '53! " 

•• 13'john Schlitzki [28 " 



Athens 1 

Virginia ...... 

1 
Westville... 1 



Tallula 

Lincoln 

Danville 

Blooraingt'n 
Westville... 



Colfax.... 
Westvill^i. 



Catlin 

Gleuburn... 
Westville... 
Grape Creek 
Westville... 



Totals 



2 Falling roof 

.'Falling roof 

4;Fallinj>:dowu shaft.. 
1 Falling roof 

.. I Premature blast 

4 Falling roof 

3 Premature blast 

..Falling coal 

5 Falling from trestle. 
. . Falling coal 



2iFalling roof. 
..Falling root. 
...Falling roof. 
..[Palling coal . 
5; Falling roof. 
..Palling roof. 
.. I Falling roof. 
..Falling roof. 
3 Falling roof. 



9| 9'25ito!29! 



Total fatal casualtic 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — 1898. 



1 j [ ' 
Residence. ! No. ! Occupation, i No. 

1 : ' 


Nature of Casualty 


No. I Colliery. 


No. 


Athens. i 1 


Driver 1 


Falling coal 

Falling down shaft 
Fall'g from trestle. 

Falling roof 

Premature blast. . . 


1 j 

3 Athens. Oonl C.n ! 1 


Bloomingtou.. 1 


iMach. helpers 
Miners. .. . 


V> 


1 
1 
12 
2 


Brookside Coal Co...! 1 


Olfax..: ! 1 

Danville i 1 

Gleuburn : 1 

Grape Creek.. 1 

Lincoln 1 1 

Tallula 1 1 

"Westville 8 

Virginia \ 2 

1 


Timbermen... 
Topmen 


2 
2 


Catlin Coal Co 

Colfax Coal Co 

GlenburnCoalCo.... 

Himrod Coal Co 

KellyvilleCoal Co... 

Lincoln Coal Co 

McLean Co. Coal Co. 

Tallula Coal Co 

Westville Coal Co.... 


1 
1 
1 
3 
2 

1 
1 
4 


Totals. ...1 19 


19 


19 


1') 















160 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — 1898. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 




6 
a 


1 


0) 

1 


Character of Injury. 


i 

"■ 03 


1897. 
July 5 
Ang. 2 


1 ! 

Alvis Schniber. . . [33' Lincoln 

William Ryan. . . . 45lCheuoa 

Thomas Reardon. 40} Decatur 

Gustoph Dietrichl34l " 

Edgar Jett 128 Niantie 

John Dolan 47l\Vestville. . . 

Wm. Dansvity . . . 30| Decatur 

Dom. Fulzenzi... 40lXiantic 


1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

"i 
1 


.... 
i 


3 

4 

1 

"3 
5 


4 

1 

h 


Ankle sprained 

Back injured 


49 
35 
1'^ 


6 


5 
2 


Body injured. 


24 


" 31 






Sept. 18 


Arm broken 


49 


•• 21 


4 

6 

■■4 
3 

"5 
2 






,•' 24 


Finger injured. 


14 


" 28 


Cooens Rubeis...l45 
John Williams... 121 




Body burnt 


38 


Oct. 4 


Westv.lle... 


.... 

1 

.... 

1 

.... 

1 

1 

.... 

.... 

1 

.... 


i!":" 


Leg broken 


100 


6 


Adam Malinopskii35 Decatur 

Prank Woods !23!Niantic 


.... 

1 

.... 

1 

1 

.... 
1 

1 

.... 

1 
1 


3 
2 

1 




9f> 


7 


Body injured. 


37 


" Ic 


FredHible 

S. Leconte 

Clhris Elenfelt.... 

Jacob Kloss 

Frank Thompson 

Thos. Cokely 

A. McDaniel 

John Willigram.. 
Albert Swartz.... 


19 
23 
45 
53 
24 
27 
20 
41 
45 


Grape Creek 
Westville.... 
Danville.... 
Westville.... 
Danville .... 
Jacksonville 
Mt. Pulaski. 
Petersburg . 
East Peoria. 




10' 


" IS 


Hand injured 


20 


•* 14 

" 20 


Arm broken 

Finger injured. 


56 
21 


" 28 
Nov. 1 


Leg broken and head injured. 
Fingers injured . . . 


90- 
20 


4 

5 


"5 
5 
4 


"6 
6 
5 


Leg broken, compound 

Arm injured. 


90 
12 


6 




W 


g 


Peter Johnson .... '40' Danville .... 

Lewis Droskasky].. Westville.... 

Martin Reynolds. 26 

Wm. Hamilton... 38' 

Chas. Brozetti.... 32 

P. Ham'nstrovel. 25 Danville .... 

Benj. Feldman... 50. Lincoln 

Juli s Reynolds., 38l Decatur 

V. Martin l24lWestville.. . . 


Leg broken 


56 


" 15 


Foot crushed 

Foot crushed 


30 


" 16 


"3 

■"8 
5 


"4 

■■■9 
6 


48' 


•' IS 




M 


Dec. 3 






6 




1?0 


6 




'>0 


6 


Leg broken 


80 


9 


Ankle dislocated 


SO' 


" 22 


A. Alesomrini — 130 
Frank Patkus.... .. 

F. Patkus |40 


Niantic 


Body injured. 


18 


" 31 


We.stville.... 


"i 

1 

.... 

1 

1 

.... 








90 


" 31 


Foot injured 


90> 


1898. 
Jan. 4 


Jesse Humble.... 25 Danville .... 


.... 

1 

:::: 
.... 

i 


2 

'"6 

1 
3 

3 


2 
4 

'■■4 


Back and leg injured 


20' 


5 


J. Englehart 

George Smith.... 
Gottfried Reich . . 


28|Mt. Pulaski 
27 Danville .... 

64lDecatur 

eOChenoa 

35 Danville .... 




tfiO 


•' 10 


Body injured. 


30 


" 20 




60' 


" 27 Edward Donnelly 


Hip bone broken. 




" 28 Fred Felerenham. 




5fi 


reb.1 


S. Harris 


28; Grape Creek 
aspolffl-r 


Leg, back and head injured.. 
Body injured 




Frank Tf eaiip-h. 


30 


itjohn Hvo'tt :3SI " 


Body injured. ... 


30 


1 


Edward Eckland. 24 
George Potter 37 


" 


Body injured 


30 


" 11 


Fairmount . 


1 
1 
1 
1 
.... 

1 
.... 


Body injured . .. 


60 


" 14 


John Spiriling ... 401 Danville. ... 

C E.Robinson... 21|Colfax 

Patrick Burns ...'41iFairmonnt 






" 14 


4 


Body injured 


15 


" 17 


Foot broken 


I"; 


" 18 


(Teorge Gurick... 
W. G. Birdsall ... 
Charle.s Rigdon.. 
Wm. McUormack 
Frank Woods .... 

Aug. Rostek 

Fred Sturbe 

B. F. Meeker 

M. Stefani 

Lew Taylor 

Wm. Chatman.... 


24' Westville... 

33! 
40 


1 

"i 
.... 

1 


"2 

5 

■■'2 


■■"3 
6 

"3 


Ankle broken 


1 


" 19 

" 28 


Finger broken. . .• 


" 28 


32 
23 
16 
26 

■i5 


Niantic 

Decatmr .... 
Danville. ... 


Back injured 


April 7 




•' 8 


Ribs broken 


" 10 








•' 14 




1 

1 


Collar bone broken 


" 29 










May 19 


S 

16 1 
42 i 
4^ 


Danville 


1 

1 

.... 
1 


"4 
5 


■■■'■) 




'• 20 


Westville... 
Danville. ... 






i 






•' 25 Charles Berusk.. 


Grape Creek 
We.stville... 


I 
1 


Back and hips injured 


i 


6 Bert O'Brien 1.30' 


Foot injured 


s" 


" 10 Martin Andersoni31 




h 


" 13 Tony Arnish 43l 


Foot in j ured 


i. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 161 

Non-F(dal Casualties — Fourth District — Concluded. 



Date 


Name. 


< 


Residence. | .i 

1 1: 
1 ^ 


"3) 






Character of Injury. 


i 


1898. j 
June 14j ( )niey Stearns 


251 Grape Creek 

2t 


1 




1 


Arm and hip injured 


90 


•' 221 Richard Roberts. 


1 




Cheek bone broken 


60 






.... 1 


Shoulder injured 




" 2j Peter Rolice 




Danville 




1 


....1.... 










36 


101 1 134 

















* Not recovered July 1, 

t Foot amputated. 

I Permanently injured. 



Total men injured I 92 

Not reported July 1, 1898 : 1 

Not reported — \ 24 

Number recovered j 67 

Total time lost by men recovered 2, 988 days. 

Average time lost per man recovered 44.6 " 



Recajjit Illation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Fourth District — 1898. 



No. Occupation. 



No. Nature of Casualty! No. 

I 



Colliery. 



Chenoa 

Colfax 

Danville . . . . 

Decatur 

East Peoria . 
Fairmount .. 
Grape Creek 
Jacksonville 

Lincoln 

Mt. Pulaski.. 

Niantic 

Petersburg . . 
Westville.... 
Not reported 



Cager 

Drivers 

Laborer 

Loaders 

-Vlach. helpers 
Macb. runner. 

Miners 

Pitbo^s 

Roadmen 

Spragser 

Topman 

Trapper 

Not reported. 



Blown out shot 

Cage 

Falling coal 

Falling in air shaft 
Falling rock 

I Falling coal 

IFire damp 

i<Tas explosion . ... 

iMacUine 

iMachine truck — 

|Pi''k 

[Pit cars 

[Premature blasts.. 
Windlass 

jNot reported 



!C. &.K. C. Coal Co... 

{Col 'ax Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co 

Davis Coal Co 

Decatur Coal Co 

: Economy Coal Co.... 

iHilliardsi .' 

Himrod Coal Co 

KellyvilleCoalCo,... 

Lincoln Coal Co 

I Pawnee Coal Co 

Union ( 'oal Co 

Westville Coal Co ... 
Not reported 



11 



162 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Table showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependerds, Time Lost, with Averages and Percentages — Fourth 
District. 



Nature of Injukies. 



Total ^^e" 
^^y^- dais. 



Ankles injured 

Arms broken 

Arms injured 

Arms and hips injured 

Backs injured 

Bodies injured 

Cheek bone broken 

Collar bone broken 

Feet crushed 

Feet injured 

ringers injured 

Hands injured 

Heads injured 

Hips injured 

Hip bone broken 

Legrs broken 

Legs injured 

Ribs broken 

Shoulders injured 

^'ot reported 

Totals, averages and percentages 



40 
2 
211 716 

6| 174 

7 150 

20 



i 
50.5 
50 I 
12 
iiO 

35 i 
40.8. 
60 
60 
31 

48.2 
25.9 
15 
20 
40 



43.5 

75 
20 1 



5.88 
4.41 
1.47 
1.47 
7.36 

22.06 
1.47 
1.47 
4.41 
7.35 

10.3 
4.41 
1.47 
1.47 
1.47 

13.24 
5.88 
2.94 
1.47 



134 



164 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 



Cass County— Fourth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


s 

p 
5z; 


T 

=4-1 

o 


1 
o a 


S 
s 

li 


c 
o 


1 
o 

P 

^ p. 


1 
J 

o 

1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

3 


1 

Cass County Coal Co. Virginia 

Chris Nelson IChandlerviUe 

J. S. & G. S. Russell . Ashland 


215 
30 
205 


2.10 
2.10 
2.6 


5 
5 
5 


Sh. 


S. 


M. 
B. 

M. 


Si S 

1,500| 1,200 


150 
300 




Totals 




2,900 


2,450 


450 
























"^"^^^^ 










1 











Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 4. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 3. 



Logan County— Fourth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


2 


I 

o 
Q 


1 

li 


a 

3 

a 

li 


•5 

o 
o 


"73 
i 

o 

a< o 


1 

o 
n 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 


Citizens' Coal M. Co. 
UnionCoal MiningCo. 
Lincoln Coal Co 


Lincoln 

Mt. Pulaski... 
Lincoln 


285 
360 
272 


5 
4 
5.4 


5 
5 
5 


Sh. 


S. 


B. 


75.010 
21,635 
81,290 


48,430 
15,420 
54, 192 


26.580 
6.215 
27.098 




177.935 


118,042 


59.893 
























verag 


1 



















Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 3. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 3. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



165 



Cass County, 1S98 — Concluded. 





VA 




CO 






































u 


3 H 


<u 






>■" 


£ 




s 


S^S 


^ 


< 



Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 



Employes. 



Price paid per 
gross ton. 








i 


a 




•=5bi 


•Sii 




sn 


"S 


a a 






oS 






&H 







Acci- 


* 


_; 


den's 




<u 
















1 




j^ 








o 








r3 






"o 
















l» 


e^ 




s 1 










Q 


^ 


fe 


^ 1 



Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 



$1 65 
1 75 
1 50 



S570 
1.662 
1.950 




Lof/an Countu, 1S9S — Concluded. 





Values. 




Employes 




Wages. 




1 


3 


Acci- 
d'nts 






£.2 




a 


fl 


> 




Price paid per 


•r_>. 


1 












■1 


Cj 


• 


gross ton. 


-■% 


^ 


i; 


1 


Capacity 




o— 


Aggregate 


s 


5-: 


*4/ 


"S 




>;& 


> 


%■ 


! 






^ 


i 


mine — 




2,^ 


value 
of total 


'3 


33 


^ 


ft 


e3 • 


3. 


5b 
a >. 


5 


K 


1 _. 


tons. 


1 

a 

3 


l3 


product. 


it 




3l 


3 
1 


-^.2 

'" S 




2 3 

-?a 


o 


o 

i 

til 


■5 


1 




1 


$1 10 


S73.208 


75 


» 


11 


100 


SO 42.5 




S. M. 


200 


2.480' 11 2I 125.000 


2 


100 


18.527 


30 


4 


5 


39 


50 






30(1 


1.200.. 2 45.000 


3 


90 


62.321 


80 


28 


11 


119 


42.5 




215 


2,500'..' 2 120,000 






5154.056 


185 


46 


"7 


258 








6.180 1 6 290.000 




$0 99.5 













$0 43.4 






238 



















! 1 



166 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Macon Comity — Fourth District — 1S98. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

1 


I 





1 


1 

a 

a 

.2 2 

|S 

0° 




.a 


1 

ni 

2 


1- 


1 



a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 

3 


Decatur Coal Co. No. 1 

;; ;; No. 2 

Totals 


Decatur 

Niantic... '.'.";.'.■ 


612 
614 
365 


4 s'^Sh. 

4 5 " 

5 5j " 

L___ 


S. 


M. 
B. 


99,462 
111,602 
89.200 


75,000 
80,000 

75,887 


24,462 
31,602 
13, 313 




300,264 


230,8871 69,377 




Averages 





























Whole number of openings reported in 1 
Whole number of openings reported for : 



McLean County— Fourth District— 189 8. 











Description. 






Output. 






1 


§1 


1 

a 


i 


■a 

.a 


1 








1 


Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


.a 




■1% 

O 0-. 


o 


o 

- 0) 

p 


3 
o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


3 






aj 




(BO 


/3 












;z; 






Q 


H 


'J 


CO 


02 


g 








1 


McLean Co. Coal Co.. Blooraington.. 


541 


* 


2&5'sh. 


s. 


M. 


130, 000 


110.000 20.000 


?. 


Colfax Coal &Min. Co. 


Colfax 


400 


5 i 61 " i " 


B. 


31,094 


20,577 


10,517 


3 


Davies Coal Co 


Chenoa 


275 


4.8 


61 " 






10, 500 


8,000 


2,500 




171, 594 


133. 577 


33. 017 




































1 





* Upper seam, 4 feet thick, 55 cents per gross ton; lower seam, 3 feet thick, 
gross ton. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 3. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 3. 



i cents per 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



I(i7 



Macon County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


EjiPLcyES. 


Wages. 


§■ 




Acci- 

den's 






if 


Agffregrate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 
t 

a. 
g 


i 

c . 

si 

<u c 


o 

■s 


•2 
$ 

S 



Price paid 
per gross ton. 


if 

11 

^3 




1 



eS 

Q 


i 

1 
a 



1 


3 

a 



"A 


Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 


a 

3 


d 




1 


$1 :iO 

1 20 

78 


»I07,123 
118,121 
04.517 


100 
110 


15 
18 
10 


6 

7 
6 


121 
135 

88 


so 50 ! 




308 
308 
225 






3 
4 
4 


150 000 


3 


50 
40 


-■:i:: 


■3,'596 


— 


150,000 
120,000 






S289, 761 


282 


43 


19 


344 




3,596 


11 


490 000 




$1 06 












SO 46.6 






280 

































McLean Couniy, 1808 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 




^ 




Acci- 




















.i; 










S.9 




i § 


<u 




Price 




£3 




■5 










.5S 




CO 1 vS 






per gross ton. 


%z 





u 






Capacity 




°S5 


Aggregate 


1 111! 






^ 


j= 


> 


I 






of 
mine- 


1 




of total 
product. 


0. of m 
ployed. 

ther eni 
der groi 

11 eniplo 
ground. 


I 




- 5 


2— 
~ S 


OS 



>> 

at 


Si 


"3 


d 



tons. 


z 


<; 




Z i 1 < 


Eh 


&. 


Ct, 


- 


d 


w 


5^ 


^ 




1 


$1 15 


si4:;,500 


200 25 


30 


255 


* 




w. 


250 


15 


1 


6 


200,000 


2 


1 15 


28,589 


25 10 


9 


44 


SO 42 




S-M. 


260 


1,205 


1 


2 


50,000 


3 


1 70 


16,725 


15; 3 


4 




55 






290 


600 






25, 000 






$187,814 


240 


38! 43 


321 










1.820 


•> 


10 


275, 000 




$1 18 2 











SO 58.3 


1 


267 




















1 


, , 









168 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Menard County— Fourth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 


1 
o 

f 

Q 


U 


X2 

g 

s 






73 


a 


0) 

. 
■^. ■" 
§^ 

|a 

CO 





Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


2 
3 
4 


Athens Mining: Co 

Chicago &K.C.C. Co. 
Wabash Coal Co. No.2 

Tallula Coal Co 

William Parkin 


Athens 

Petersburg. . . 

Athens 

Tallula 

Sweetwater . . 
Petersburg. .. 

Tice ... . . . 


200 
155 
187 
185 
170 
85 
60 
60 
85 
100 


5.6 

5.6 

5.6 

5.6 

5.6 

6 

6 

5.6 

6 

6 


5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 
SI. 

Sh. 

:: 


S. 

i 

Ho. 
Ho. 


*B. 
B. 


83.981 
58,335 
80,000 
24,304 
3,068 
4,646 
2,035 
287 
954 
56,550 


42,667 

* 34,601 

57,800 

22,508 

2,151 

4,646 

2.035 

272 

954 

45, 000 


41.314 
23.734 
22.200 
1.796 
917 


6 

H 


South Mountain C. Co. 

William Denton 

P. M. Miller 


15 


9 
10 


M. A. Hohimer 

Greenview C. Min.Co. 

Totals 


Petersburg. . . 
Greenview ... 


"ii.'sM 




314, 160 


212,634 


101.526 
































■■'T"" 













* Both. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 11. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 18D8. 10. 



Tazewell Comity— Fourth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator, 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

s 


X 

o 

a 

0) 


o ^ 

ii 

to 

3=2 


Ji 

1* 


u 

o 

o 

1 


o 

i 

o 

11 


1 

o 

c 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 




East Peoria Coal Co.. 

E.C.Sloan 

A. C. Blake 

Bohlander Bros 

King & Grossweiler. . 
Gustave Gebelhausen 
Rusche Bros 


East Peoria .. 
Pekin. . .. 


85 
100 

50 
120 
130 

90 

65 

50 
100 

85 
100 

60 


4 

5 

4 

4.4 

5.2 


5 

1 
5 
6 


it 

1: 

Sh. 


S. 

Ho. 

S. 
Ho. 

S. 
Ho. 


B. 

;; 


16,250 
7,500 

20,000 
6,035 
1,600 
529 
1, 7.35 


13, 550 
7,500 

14,806 
6,035 
1,440 
529 
1.7,35 


2,700 


3 
4 


East Peoria... 
Pekin 


5,19^ 

ieo 


6 

7 


East Peoria .. 

;; 

Peoria '.'. 

East Peoria .. 
Pekin 


4.4 5 
4.4' 5 




8 
9 
10 


Gi'oveland Coal Co... 

Millard Bros 

Phillip Butler 

L. Grant & Sons 


4 
4.4 

4.6 
4.8 
4.4 


5 

I 

5 
5 


3, 10S| 2, 706 
1,800: 1.300 
2.5001 2,500 
21.500 21.500 


402 
300 


1^ 


East Peoria .. 


1,950 


1.950 












84,507 


75.751 


8.756 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 12. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 1. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 12. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



169 



Menard County, 1S98 Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 




§ 




Acci- 






















. 








£.S 




g 


a 

3 


> 




Price paid 






2 








of 


Agrgresrate 
value 
of total 


.i 

s . 


ll 


^ 
1 


o5 

o 

ft 


per gross ton. 




1 


1 

p. 




Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 




a 


i 

a 




•? 


I 


. o 
> 0. 


product. 


oft 


ll 


a; o 
=: 611 


S 
1 


~ 9 
'S 

ol 




tJ o 

•?a 


o 
1 


o 


15 


3 
s 




i5 


< 




;z; 




< 


t^ 


fe 


fc 


^ 


Q 


w 


:^ ^2; 




1 


$0 80 


$58,921 


58 


49 


13 


120 


$0 40.7 


so 24 


S-M. 


163 


1,785 


1 


, 


240,000 




76.5 


35,987 


80 


14 


1;^ 


107 


40.7 






15(1 


2.004 




1 


150,000 


•A 


70 


48,230 


70 


16 


1(1 


96 


40.7 






180 


3,200 




1 


120,000 


4 


83 


19, 159 


25 


5 


7 


37 


48.7 






30(1 


971 


1 


1 


40,000 


5 


1 50 


4,122 


6 






10 


48.7 




M. 


125 


130 






5.525 


6 


125 


5,807 


4 


1 


1 


6 


40,7 




S-M . 


210 


222 






6,000 


7 


1 25 


2,544 


3 




1 


4 


50 




W. 


15(1 


150 






5,000 


H 


1 50 


427 


2 


2 


1 


5 


50 






75 


10(1 






1,000 


9 


1 12 


1,06S 


*> 


1 


1 


4 


50 






125 


80 






S,000 


10 


85 


42.870 


60 




7 


79j 40.7 




S-M. 


170 


2,275 






75,000 






$219, 135 


310 


102 


56 


468 








10,917 


9 


5 


647, 525 




SO 95.8 












$0 41.5 


$0 24 





165 












1 





















Taz 


ewell County 


1S98 


— Concluded 












V. 


LLUEs. Employes. 




Wages, 




o 




Acci- 
den's 


















1? 


-g 








ft<u 




^ 


^ 


m 








.i >> 


I 










5 


2 


o 




Price paid per 


S5 


s 


3 










Aggregrate 

value 

of total 


a 

2 . 


CO 


o . 


o 


gros> 


ton. 




o 
> 
1 






Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 






^bi 


J2 

a 

3 




product. 




j| 




^ 


—.2 


S.5 
£ S 

c'a 




o 
>> 


=3 


1i 

lis 




Z 


<; 




■z, o 


< 


H 


&< 


i. 


a- 


a 


M 


fej Z 




1 


$0 95 


814,627 271 1 


3 


31 


$0 47 




S-M. 


20. 


™L 




35,000 


•> 


1 00 


7,500 15: 2 


3 


20 


50 






20r 


3001 . . 




37,500 


3 


1 00 


16, 029 30! 4 




:<8 


45 




' ' 


174 


1,000 .. 




65,000 


4 


1 10 


6,638! 8! 1 




10 


t 72.5 






225 


350!.. 




15,000 


5 


1 12.5 


1,620 


41 




5 


t 72.5 




' ' 


13(1 


801.. 




3,000 


6 


1 00 


529 


3 




4 


t 72 




w. 


20(1 


461.. 




1,500 


7 


1 00 


1,7.35 


9 1 




11 


t 67.5 




S-i\l, 


12(1 


1041 . . 





4.000 


8 


1 00 


2,806 


81 1 1 


10 


68 




w. 


110 


135.. 




6,000 


9 


100 


l,620j 14 4i 3 


21 


45 






75 


90.. 1 1 


10,000 


10 


1 00 


2,500' 51 1 1 


7 


50 






12(1 


100.. .... 


5,000 


11 


1 00 


21,500: 12^ 3 2 


17 


42 




• ' 


200 


S60!. .!.... 


40.000 


iy 


100 


1,9501 4! 1 


5 


50 






159 


100 




















$79,054 139: 18 22 


179 






3,879 .. 


1 


222,000 




$1 00 






*S0 45.4 






.59 


t 








1 








1 





t Fork 


ed coal. 
















* Aver 


age price p 


aid fo 


r71,50 


Ogros 


s tons 



















170 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Vermilion County — Fourth District — 1898. 



Name of Operator. 



Description. 



Output. 



Total rp 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



Economy C. & M. 
Catlin Coal Co. 



Co. I Danville. 
Catlin. 



We? 



KellyvilleC. Co. No. 2 

Pawnee Coal Co 

Himrod Coal Co 

Westville Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co. 
Consolidated Coal Co 
Butler B. Co. (lessee) 

10 Mimcie Coal Co 

11 .J. W. Ellsworth & Co. 

12 Jonah .James 

13 John Sherpard 

14 Warren Neil 

15 J. W. Boyd 

16 BertHodge 

17 Wm. Jones 

18 H. Blakeny 

19' John Woodard 

20iSpang:ler& IMiller.... 

21|L. E. Haker 

22 B. Beddow 

23!Geo. Haskin 

24|Thos. Jones ICatlin 

25 A. b. Woodard 

26Thos. Evans 

27lMauck Bros 

28tEvan Jones 

29!Vespaisan Palmer — 

SOjA.JonPS & Sons 

3I1L0US Pishon 

32 Marriage & Son 

33 Thomas Graham 

34 Danville B & T. Co.. 

35 J. W. Horning 

36jJ. A. Allison 

37lOtto Leveridge 

38i William Ray 

39 Stansbury & Watkins 

40 A. H. Bonnett 

41 John Swanson 

42 John R. Collmrn 

43 E. S.Gray 

44 Elisha Lloyd 

45 Br'ksideC.M.Co.des) 
46Br'ksideC.M.CoNo.2 

47 Br'ksideC.M.Co.No.4 

48 Kelly ville C. Co. No. 3 

49 Kellyville C. Co. No. 1 

50 D. A. Jfnkins... 

51 M. C. Wilkinson 
o2' Bunting Bros... 
53 Frances Bros ... 



lie. 



Danville 

Westville 

Fairmount ... 

Tilton 

Oakwood 

Muncie 

Glenburn 

Grape Creek.. 
Vandercook .. 

Danville 



Catlin 

Grape Creek. 

Oakwood 

Danville 

Oakwood 

Danville 

Grape Creek. 



Grape O-eek: 

Danville 

Catlin 

Grape Creek.. 

Catlin 

Danville 

Grape Creek.. 
Georgetown... 

Danville 

Georgetown.. 
Danville 



Snyder 

Danville 

Vandercook .. 
Danville 



200 
90 
170 
212 
208 

I' 
2001 
150 
40 
60 ! 
501 
90 
40 
.30 
100! 
60| 
lOOl 
80 
60 
85 
40 
60 
45 
40 
50 
80 
51 
100 
70 
10 
12 
10 
70 
60 
50 
50 
100 



Grape Creek.. I 

Westville. 
Danville .. 



Grape Creek. 
Catlin 



Ho, 



6 •' 

el SI 

6. •' 
BiSh 



7 
7 
6 
7Sh. 



64.398 

86,157 

248,872 

173.540 

68,094 

165,899 

41.464 

24.024 

110.320 

27.700! 

41.7271 

1.000 

800 1 

1501 

1,2001 

1,400 

i.oool 

1,200| 

400 1 

1,300 

2.500 

850 

1,00c 

1,200 

2,000 

75 

4,500 

400 

400 

2.825 

900 

1,000 

400: 

8,000 

350 

900 

800 

700 

1,500 

6.000 

1,800 

1,000 

4,000 

5,100 

49,420 

12,212 

9.870 

2.35.220 

49.9.50 

5.100 

1.200 

5. 422 

5.200 



164, 398 

67 860 

248.872 

128, 140 

56, 169 

165.899 

30,885 

17.718 

100.465 

25,600 

41.727 

700 

600 

120 

1,000 

1,100 

750 

900 

350 

1,000 

2,000 

750 

750 

900 

1.500 

60 

3,600 

350 

300 

2,825 

700 



8.000 

350 

800 

800 

600 

1,000 

5,500 

1.300 

800 

3,500 

3,3.50 

49.420 

11,233 

6,870 

235,220 

49,950 

4,050 

900 

4.000 

5,200 



Stripping. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Vermilion County, iS.9S— Continued. 



171 




* Laborers paid SI. 50 per day. 

t 35 cents, 50 cents and 55 cents. 

t Leased February 21, 1898. 

i Wages paid to laborers, S1.25 per day. 



172 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Vermilion County — Fourth District — 1898 — Concluded. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

a 

d 

2; 


1 

J3 
P, 

Q 


S cs 


a 

a 

M 

O m 


■a 

o 

o 
p. 


i 

i 

o . 

la 


o 
1 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 




C. H. Dobbins 

William Shaffer 

S.Parle 

E. Earle 

A. Humes 

Bushong- Bros 






6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


7 
7 

6 

e 

6 

7 


St. 

SI. 
D. 

SI. 


iid. 


St. 
B. 


3,000 


3.000 










600 600 




56 
57 
58 
59 


;; ; 


110 
40 
45 

48 
90 


23, 460 
4,000 
1,000 
6,200 
200 


22.960 
4,000 
1,000 
6,200 
200 


500 










Totals 


1,520,699 


1.399,791 


120,908 






















' 








1 











Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 59. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 60. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



173: 



Vermilion County, 1S9S — Concluded. 





Values. 




Employes. 


j Wages. 




s 




Acci- 




















2 


•6 


den's 






ao. 




;:. 


• 


o 


: 


..::. >> 






; S.S 










1 Price paid 


fi''4 


p 














Aggregate 
value 
of total 


a 
2 . 


ll 


.a 


i 

o 


per gros.s ton. 


il 


o 

> 


53 

1 






Capac- 




a 


2 
2 ti 


ity of 
mine- 
tons. 


3 


product. 


6 0. 


JS 

^ S 


if 

s it 


s 

3 




3 

S'3 
oS 




o 


1 






•A 


< 




2; 


5 


< 


EH 


fe 


&< 


Ph 


Q 


M 


fe 


'Z 




54 


$1 00 
1 00 
100 


$3,000 

600 

23,210 


5 
3 
5 






5 
3 


j 


;;;;■.;.■; 


W. 


75 
60 
175 


1 






55 












1,800 
30,000 


56 




i 


7i$0 40 


782 






b'i 


90 


3,600 


10 




1 


12 


40 




S-M. 


1,50 


1(K) 






8.000 


58 


90 


900 


4 




1 


6 


40 




" 


75 


25 






10,000 


69 


90 


5,400 


5 




1 


7 


40 






1,50 


150 






12,000 


60 


1 00 


200 






1 


3 


40 




w. 




75 


5 


1? 


59 


2,500 






$1,202,627 


1,743 


492 


194 


2,429 






33,223 


3, 754, 90O 




$0 82.34 












$0 40.52 


$0 28.25 





150.4 































174 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties — 



■County. 



Mines 



Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 



Tons 

of lump 

coal. 



Tons 
of other 
grades. 



Tons 
shipped. 



•faa 



Values. 



-5 p 
$ a 



< 



Cass , 

Logan 

Macon 

McLean 

Menard 

Tazewell 

Vermilion 

Totals 

Averages 



177, 935 
300.264 
171, 594 
314, 160 
84.507 



.. 1,520,699 



2,450 
118,042 
230.887 
138.577 
212.634 
75,751 
1.399,791 



33.017 

101,526 

8,756 

120,908 



2,572,059 



2.178,132 



393,927 



128,666: 

I 

204,375 

33,650^ 

I 

266.336, 

16, 725| 

1.340.144i 



24,000 
290,000 
420,000 
275.000 
647.525 
222, 000 
.754.900 



$1,615 
0.995 
1.06 
1.182 
0.958 
1.00 
0.823 



$4. 182 
154,056 
289, 761 
187,814 
219, 135 

79.054 
1,202.627 



1,£ 



,8961 5.633,425 



$2,136,629 



Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 95. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 2. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 3. 
TVhole number of openings reported for 1898, 94. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Fourth l)istrict~lS9S. 



Employes. 





^ 
















v: 


h 
















a 


o 


o 


o 




p. 




;- <n 
















2 


s o 


a 


s 






•z 


'Z 





Casualties. 



Average price 
paid per gross ton. 



c ! For For . Hj" 

9 i hand machine 3 &i: u 
-3 I mining, mining. |-2.Si'2 



1.109 4.( 



123 
288, 
280: 
267, 
165| 

159; 

150' 



50 
6, 180| 
3,596!. 
1.82o| 

10.917! 
3.879j. 

33,223 



K«:;l 



SO. 825 
.434 
.466 
.583 
.415 
.454 
.405 



49' 502,339 



56 555. 6C2 



T-'T 



COAL IN ILLINOIS, 177 



FIFTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 181)8. 

Counties: Calhoun, Christian, Greene. Macoupin, Montgomery, Sangamon, 
Shelby, Scott, Jersey, Morgan. 

Walton Rutledge, Inspector, Alton. 



Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Sprim) field, Illinois: 

Sir: — In accordance with section 12 of an act of the Genei'al Assembly de- 
fining the duties of State Inspectors of coal mines of Illinois, I herewith sub- 
mit the annual report for the Fifth Inspection District for the year ending 
July 1, 1898, which is the fifteenth annual contribution to the coal statistics 
of the State. In the Fifth District coal mines are operated in the counties of 
Calhoun, Christian, Greene, Jersey, Morgan, Macoupin, Montgomery, San- 
gamon, Shelby and Scott. A tabular statement is herewith given of the sta- 
tistics of each county, showing the number of mines operated during the 
year, both shipping and local mines, and new and abandoned mines; the 
depth of coal below the surface, with the geological number and thickness of 
the various coal seams; the number of miners and other employes working 
in the mines and on the surface; the total tonnage of all grades of coal; the 
average value of coal for the whole district, with the value per ton at each 
mine; the value of the product at the mine, a-id the aggregate value of the 
total product, and the casualties in and around the mines, both fatal and 
non-fatal. 

The following summary is given as a recapitulation of the principal facts 
found in the schedules of the various counties: 

Number of mines SI 

Shipping mines 5'S 

Local mines 2S 

New mines 8 

Abandoned mines 6 

Total output in tons of 2. 000 pounds 3, 925, 690 

Tons of lump coal 2. 718. 175 

Tons of other grades 1,207. 515 

Tons shipped by railroads 3, 3J5, 071 

Average value per ton of lump coal at the mine SO 80 

Aggregate value of total product J 2, 576, 994 00 

Number of miners 4.424 

Number of other employes 1.669 

Total number of employes 6,093 

Average number of days worked during the year 191.6 

Number of kegs of powder used 86, 244 

Fatal accidents 5 

Non-fatal accidents 48 

Number of coal-cutting machines used 133 

—12 



178 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Tons of coal cut by machines 1,054,678 

Number of tons of coal produced t<) each fatal accident 785, 138 

Number of tons of coal produced to each non-fatal accident 81, 785 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident 1, 218 

Number of persons employed to each non-f utal accident 143 

Estimated annual capacity, in tons, of existing mines as now equipped 9,537,550 



Coal production by counties in the Fifth District, with increase or decrease 
each, for the years ending July 1, 1897, and July 1, 1898. 





Total Output in Tons. 


Increase. 


Decrease. 


Counties. 


1897. 


1898. 




3,868 4,893 

837,897 • 495,616 

7, 200 S- .'520 


1,025 




Christian 


342,281 




1,320 
1,680 
1.800 


Jersey. . . ..... 




1,680 

1,800 

1 2fil fli'fi 










Macoupin 


1,975,981 


711 055 




251,249 1 294; 667 

1,838,453 I 1,763,863 

25,125 i 21,337 

69, 329 \ fiS. .S88 


43.418 




Sangamon 


74 590 


Scott 




3,788 


Shelby 




941 












Total 


5,009,102 


3,925,690 


49.243 


1,132,655 







Decrease. 
Increase . 



Net decrease 



1,083,412 



The district shows a decrease in output of 1,083,412 tons. This is owing' to 
the general strike of 1897, and the lockout since April 1, 1898, of the mines 
on the Chicago & Alton railroad south of Springfield, and the mines in the 
Pana coal field. The mines of the Consolidated Coal Co., which embrace six 
of the largest mines in the district, worked about seven months in the 
year. The mines at Pana, Taylorville and Assumption, which are all large 
mines, worked about six months in the year. The Madison Coal Company's 
mine at Mt. Olive, which is also one of the largest mines, worked about six 
months. The mines in Sangamon county worked about nine months. Mont- 
gomery county shows an increase in output of 43,418 tons. This is owing to 
the fact that the Coffeen Coal Mining & Coke Co. 's mine was operated continu- 
ously with a large force of men during the three months' strike in 1897, and 
to the opening out of the Montgomery Coal Co.'s shaft at Paisley, and the 
new shaft at Raymond. Owing to the strike of 1897, and the various suspen- 
sions on April 1, 1898, the output of the district is 1,500,000 tons less than it 
would have been had the mines been worked the same number of days that 
they were in 1897. The following mines have not been worked since April 1, 
1898: Those of the Pana Coal Co., the Penwell Coal & Mining Co., the 
Springside Coal & Mining Co., the Nilwood Carbon Coal Co., the O'Gara & 
King Coal Co., the Virden Coal Co. and the Chicago- Virden Coal Co.'s Nos. 
1 and 2. These various coal companies claim they can not pay the scale price 
as fixed at Springfield last spring and run their mines at a profit. The Car- 
iinville Coal Co., the Cxirard Coal Co. and the Auburn Coal Co. are paying 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 179 

the scale price and operating their mines. They are in the same coal field 
with the companies refusing- to pay the scale. 

Mine Fire.— At the Girard Coal Co.'s mine, at Girard, a tire broke out on 
the nig-ht of April 2, 1898, which destroyed the fan-house, fan, eng-ine, rope 
and cage in the escapement shaft, burning the curbing partly at the top of 
the shaft. A new fan- house, fan, ropes and cage have been put in during the 
year and the shaft at the surface has been retimbered. 

Improvements.— Yov a more effective ventilation at the mines new fans 
twenty feet in diameter have been erected at the mines of the Madison Coal 
Co. at Mount Olive, of the Springside Coal Mining Co. at Pana, of the 
Moweaqua Coal Mining & Manufacturing Co. at Moweaqua, of the Carlinville 
Coal Co. at Carlinville, and of the Chicago- Virden Coal Co.'s No. 1 mine at 
Virden. A new fan sixteen feet in diameter is erected at the mine of the 
Springfield Coal Mining & Tile Co., Springfield, and also at the mine of the 
Cantrall Cooperative Coal Co. at Cantrall. A new boiler has been put in by 
the Carlinville Coal Co. with a steam pipe line from the main shaft to the fan 
and hoisting engine at the escapement shaft. The endless-rope cable has 
been extended for a distance of one half mile in the Springside Coal Mining 
Co.'s shaft at Pana. 

Shaking screens for the more effective cleaning of the coal have been put 
in at the mines of the Junction Mining Co., the Black Diamond Coal Mining 
& Tile Co. and the Woodside Coal Co. at Springfield, also at the mines of the 
Wabash Coal Co. at Dawson, and of the Spaulding Coal Co. at Spaulding. 

Coal-cutting machinery has been put in at the mines of the Thomas Pressed 
Brick Company, at Golden Eagle, the Raymond Coal Company, at Raymond, 
the Hillsboro Coal Company, at Hillsboro, and the Chicago- Virden Coal Com- 
panj', at Virden. An Ingersoll air compressor and an Ingersoll-Sergeant 
pick machine is used at Golden Eagle. A Norwalk air compressor and one 
Ingersoll and one Sullivan pick machine is used at Raymond. 

At the Hillsboro mine a very effective engine and dynamo plant is put in. 
The company is running four Morgan-Gardner chain-breast machines. 
Around the shaft bottom and at i\\\ main doors in the workings electric lights 
are erected. 

At Virden, at the mine of the Chicago- Virden Coal Company, the dynamo 
and engine are about the same as at Hillsboro. The company is using eight 
Link-belt chain-breast coal-eiitting machines, and electric lights are used 
ai-ound the bottom of the shaft. 

The Consolidated Coal Company has extended the cable haulage for a dis- 
tance of 1,200 feet in their No. 6 mine at Staunton. 

The Madison Coal Company has dug a large storage reservoir, affording an 
ample supply of water for the mine, and has also put in improved coal con- 
veyoi-s at their No. 5 mine at Mount Olive. 

New Mines. — The Raymond Coal Company has opened a mine during the 
the year; the shaft is 434 feet deep and the coal seam is 3 feet 3 inches in 
thickness. The coal is mined by coal-cutting machines. The hoisting engine 
is second motion, with suitable steam power. 



ISO STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The Citizens' Coal Mining Company, of Springfield, has opened what is 
called their "B" shaft. Thia shaft is 205 feet deep to coal seam No, 5, which 
is 5 feet 6 inches thick. The engine and boiler house is built of brick, with 
suitable engine and steam power; a fan 10 feet in diameter is put in for venti- 
lation ; the fan house is so built that a larger fan can be put in at any time. For 
cleaning the coal a shaking screen 60 feet long is erected. Coal, as it 
passes through the various meshes of the screen, falls direct into the railroad 
cars, dispensing with elevators and storage bins. The shaft is located three 
miles west of Springfield on the St. Louis, Chicago & St. Paul Railroad. 

The Montgomery Coal Company has opened a new mine for business during 
the year at Paisley. A tower and out buildings have been put up, with suit- 
able side tracks, and a new 12-foot fan put in. This mine is located one mile 
west of the village of Witt, in Montgomery county; a new town site is laid 
out and a number of houses have been built. The name of the new town is 
Paisley. The coal seam of the mine is No. 5, and it is about 8 feet thick; the 
shaft is 534 feet deep; the roof above the coal is very good and the coal will 
be easily mined. 

Three small coal drifts have been opened near Chesterfield, in Macoupin 
county; one small shaft 3 miles south of Murray ville, in Morgan county; 
one small drift one mile west of Delphi, in Jersey county, and a new shaft 
near Roodhouse, in Greene county. 

Abandoned Mines. — Two small drifts have been abandoned — one at Exeter 
and one near Winchester, in Scott county, and four small drifts are aban- 
doned in Shelby county. 

Escapement Shafts — The Litchfield Mining and Power Company is sinking 
an escape shaft. The Edinburg Coal Company is sinking a new escapement 
shaft in place of the one that caved in some two years ago. The Montgomery 
Coal Company, of Paisley, is sinking an escapement shaft. The Junction 
Mining Company and the Black Diamond Coal Mining and Tile Company, 
both of Springfield, are driving entries from each side with a view to making 
underground connection between the two mines for additional escape-ways. 

Fatal Accidents. — John French, a machine helper, aged 31 years, was 
killed July 9, 1897, in the Hornsby mine. The machine runner was cutting 
in the corner of a room; a piece of coal had been left up from the last shot; 
the coal fell. French, it appears, had a pick in his hand; he had jumped 
back when the coal fell, but falling beneath it, the pick stuck in his forehead 
and killed him. 

William Schulze, a driver, aged 20 years, was killed October 22,1897, in the 
Sangamon Coal Co.'s mine. He was going in with an empty trip; there were 
some iron rails on top of the cai's. It appears that the front ends of the rails 
had projected beyond the side of the front car, the one he was riding on. 
The ends of the rails caught some props on the side of the entry and knocked 
them out. Slate fell and caught him. 

Geo. Moore, a miner, aged 20 years, was killed January G, 1898, in the Car- 
linville Coal Co.'s mine. He was working at the face of a room. The roof 
of the room being of a treacherous nature, soft and full cf slips, a piece of 
clod fell and caught him. 



COAL IN ILLIXOIS. 



181 



Charles Hyatt, a laborer, aged 17 years, was injured January 20, 1898, by a 
premature blast, from which he died February 3, 1898. Hyatt was working 
with Peter Brown, a practical miner in the Chicago- Virden Coal Co.'s mine 
at Auburn. It appears Brown had allowed the boy, Hyatt, to charge a hole; 
the boy had got a certain quantity of powder in the hole, which, from some 
cause, exploded, burning Hyatt, also Peter Brown and his two sons, John 
and James. 

Paul Gloekner, a laborer, aged 20 years, was killed May 5, 1898, at the Con- 
solidated Coal Co.'s mine No. 8, at Mount Olive, by a passenger train on the 
Wabash railroad. He was employed with a team to pull out a wire rope to 
attach to the empty cars in order to pull them to the screens. It appears he 
had pulled the rope out to the empty cars and had unhitched his team from 
the rope, when, in turning his team, the horses got on the main track of the 
Wabash railroad. A train running east struck the horses, throwing them upon 
the driver, who was instantly killed. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walton Rutledwe, 
State Inspector of Mines, Fifth- District. 

Altox, III. 



Fatal Casualties— Fifth District— 1S9S. 



Date. 


Name. 




Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 

S 


ll 




Cause of Accident. 


1S97. 
July 9 
Oct. 22 




31 Mai!h. help'r 
2U! Driver 


Hornsby .i . 


.1 . 


1 

1 

1 
1 

5 




Pick striking head... 


Wm. ."^chultze 


Sr)riTifi'field..L. 




Falling slate 


1898. 


Geo. Moore 


20 
20 


Miner ICarlinville.. 








Falling: clod 


Feb. 3 




Laborer 






May 5 


Paul Gloekuer 


Mt OlivP 


— 






Passenger train. Wa- 


Totals 


! 


bashR.R 












1 





Total fatal casualties— 5. 

Recapitidation of Fatal Casualties— Fifth District— 1898. 



Residence. 


NO. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty No. Colliery. 


No. 


Auburn 

Oarlinville.... 

g?.^?.irv^ev.:::: 


5 


Driver 

Laborers 

Mach. helper. 


1 
2 
1 

1 


Falling clod 

Falling slate 

Passenger train, 

Wabash R. R.... 

Pick striking head 

Premature blast... 


1 Carlinville Coal Co.. 

1 jChicago-VirdenC.Co. 

'Consolidated Coal Co 

1 1 Sangamon Coal Co... 

1 

5 1 


1 


Springfield. .. 
Totals 












5 









182 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Non-Fatal Casualties— Fifth District— 1898. 



Date. 



Residence. .2 



Character of Injury. 



1897. 

July 12 

Sept.23 

Oct. 13 

" 21 

" 21 

" 30 

Nov. 8 

•• 12 

•' 15 

15 



Dec. 



May 
June 



Matt Redish 

George (golden... 
Angelo Fermenti. 
Leonard Early... 

vv'm. Simpson 

M .J. Gaffigan.... 
Andrew O'Brien. 
C. Latchin.son. . . . 
T. Feather.stone.. 
Hen-y Lefevre... 

Jos. Zephardt 

Peter Anderson.. 
Ed. Melchard 



Greenridge. 
Springfield. 

Auburn 

Springfield. 

Pana 

Springfield. 



Auburn 

Assumption 



Greenridge 
Springfield 
Auburn 



Chas. Bone 

John Weigand... 
Fred Hebenstreit 

Elmer Morris 

Geoigp Duncan.. 

Peter Brown 

James Brown — 

John Brown 

Felix Gregatis 

Mike Druve 

John Blucu 

.lohn Berriman... 

C. M. Tracy 

John Nilan 

Fred Mitchell.... 

J. T.Kelly 

Henry Buefeher. 

F. Hasse 

Anton Snyder 

Alvin Grooner — 

Henry I'liyne 

Wm. Calley 

Frank Paubel 

John Cummings. 
Julius Berroger.. 

Wm. Shaub 

Henry Hoemuth. 

John Mahon 

John Weeks 

Robert Murrell... 

Wm. Berry 

Wm. Monday 

M. Turner 

John Cooel 

Andy Kochek 



Moweaqua. . 
Greenridge. 
Staunton — 

Auburn 

Mt. Olive... 
Auburn 



Assumption 
Greenridge 



Virden 

Greenridge 
Staunton ... 



Gillespie 

Staunton . . . 

Assumption 
Staunton ... 
Litchfield.. 
Mt. Olive... 

jS^pringfield. 



Pana 

Gillespie 

Staunton ... 
Springfield 
Staunton.., 
Hillsboro... 
Springfield. 

Pana 

Virden , 

Mt. Olive... 
Virden 



Totals... 17 31 44 59 



II.... 
1 .... 



Leg broken 90 

Body injured j 120 

Body injured i 25 

Body injured | 45 

Leg broken 90 

Leg injured tl20 

Knee crushed *... 

Body injured i 20 

Arms burned , 16 

Arms burned 20 

Body injured 10 

Body injured ] 15 

Body crushed | 14 

Foot bruised 20 

Arm injured I 23 

Body injured 30 

Body injured ; 20 

Body injured 25 

Body burned 20 

Body burned 22 

Body burned 16 

Arm broken \ 90 

Body injured i 8 

Body injured 7 

Leg broken 110 

Body injired 10 

Body injured 24 

Hand crushed 21 

Foot bruised 10 

Body injured 40 

Body injureil ' 25 

Body injured ; 35 

Body injured 20 

Body injured 90 

Body in.jured 20 

Body injured 10 

Body injured 15 

Body burned i*... 

Body seriously injured *... 

Foot injured I 21 

tLegs broken and hips injuredj*. . . 

Body injured i 14 

Body injured *... 

Hip dislocated, hand bruised. *... 

Legbroken *. . . 

Body injured 20 

Finger taken off *... 

Leg broken '*. . . 



* Not recovered July 1, 1898. 

t Amputated. 

t Both legs broken. 



Total men injured 

Not recovered July 1, 1898 

Number recovered 

Total time lost by men recovered 

Average time lost per man recovered 



39 
1.351 days 
34.6 •• 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



183 



Recapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties— Fifth District- 1898. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Cause of Accident. 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 




4 

7 




1 
8 


Cage 


2 

1 
4 
7 
1 
15 
2 
1 
9 
3 
1 
2 

48 


Assam tion Coal Co. 

('apitol Coal (!o 

Chicago- Virden C.Co 
Citizen.s' Coal Co.... 
Cons,,li,larc(l C. Co.. 
Hillshoro Coal Co... 
Lit.-litirlil Coal Co... 
:\1( weaqua Coal Co.... 
O'Gara-Kiug C. Co. 

PanaCoalCo 

PenwellCoal Co 

Springfi'd Coop. C.Co 
Spriiiirtici.l.M.&T.Co 
Spi-iiiL'siilp Coal Co. 

Stann-s Coal Co 

Vinlen Coal Co 

VVoodside Coal Co... 




Auburn 


Hrivftrs 


Engine 


2 


Gillespie 

Greenridge... 

HiUsboro 

Litchfleld 

Mt. Olive 


2 Engineer 

6 Gripper 

1 Laborens 

1 Loaders 

3 Maeh. helper. 


Explos'n of powd'r 

Palling coal 

Falling from cage. 

Falling rock 

Fire-damp. . 


10 
2 
13 


Moweaqua 


1 Mach. runner. 


Plying coal 




Springfield. .. 


8 I.Mine mauag'r 
8 Picker 


Premature blast... 






4 


Timbermen. . . 
Topman 












Totals. 


48 




.8 


48 













Table showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Time Lost, with Averages and Percentages, Fifth 
Distinct. 





a 


'S 
3 




■a 
as 


1 
Time Lost. 1 

iPpr r-Ptit 


Natuhe of Injury. 


Total 
days. 


1 ^^ 
Average injuries, 
days. , 


Arm broken .. . . 


3 
30 
3 
1 

1 
1 
6 

1 


'^'4 


J 


6 

40 

3 


90 
59 
720 
51 


90 "> 09 


Arms injured 


mi (5 '^5 






Feet injured 


17 G 25 






Hand injured 


. 


21 ' 08 




1 

5 

1 




j 2 08 


Knee injured 


7 
3 




! 2 08 


Legs broken 


290 
120 


48 31 V 5 










Totals, averages and percentages . . . 


48 


17 


31 


59 


1,351 


34.6 100.00 



184 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 



Calhoun County— Fifth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


i 

a 

D 


1 

T 

o 
a 

0) 

Q 


1 

Is 

o a 

11 


a 

a 

M 




.Id 
O 

o . 

11 


O 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump . 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Thomas P. Brick Co.. 
Totals 


Golden Eagle. 




2.4 


1 


D. 


Ho. 


M. 


4,893 


4,893 






4,893 


4,893 

















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 1. 



Christian County —Fifth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoflfice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

s 


1 
o 


2^ 


i 

Is 
o 


s 

1 



. 

11 


'6 

1 

3 


a 
S 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 


AssumptionC.&M.Co. 
EdinburgC. C. Co.... 
Pana C. C. Nos. 1 & 2. 

PenwellC. M. Co 

SpringsideC. M. Co.. 
TaylorvilleCoal Co... 

Totals 


Assumption... 

Edinburg 

Pana.. 


1003 
365 
720 
723 
723 
462 


3.6 
7.0 
7.6 
7.6 
7.6 


"5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 

" 


S. 


M. 
B. 

M. 


50,000 
10.500 

101,738 
84,026 
69,352 

180,000 


34,600 

7,875 
59.860 
53, 995 
48, 548 
122,000 


15,400 
2,625 

50 878 






30. C31 


f) 




20 804 


6 


Taylorville... 


58,000 




495,616 


317,878 


177, 738 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 6. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



185 



Calhoun County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 




s 

a 
o 

1 
o 


-d 
-a 

1 


Acci- 
den's 






Cm 

as 


Agrgrregrate 

value 

of total 

prodiict. 


a 

U 

a _ 


a 

o . 

11 


a) 
o 

i 

o 

P.T3 

si 


o 

a 

S 

1 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 


0^" 








"3 


3 


Capacity 


a 

2i 


a 

a . 

f- 3 




of 
mine- 
tons. 


1 


$1 50 


$7,339 


8 


7 


2 


17 





$0 52 


M. 


258 


175 


- 


.... 


6.000 




SI 50 


$7,339 


8 


7 


2 


17 






175 




6,000 






$0 52 




258 



























Christian County, 1898— Concluded. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 









Acci- 






















1 


1 


den's 






ts 




a 


s 


0) 

o 




Price paid per 


2-^ 

i| 














^2 

o 
0*3 


Aggregate 




4 
o-a 


■i 


p>i 


gross ton. 


fr- 


^ 






Capacity 




^ 


i 


mine— 






value 




&§ 


>= 








t^-^ 


^ 











1 


.art 

SI 


of total 
product. 


a . 
-^ 

•SI 

do 


c o 


II 


a 

"o 


o 2 


2g 
o2 


IS 

^1 




1 


1 


1 




:zi 


-s: 




^ 


o 


<i 


^ 


fc 


fa 


0.^ 




^ 


u. 






1 


$1 10 


$44,220 


140 


20 


10 


170 


$0 50 




S-M. 


1,30 


85 




4 


120,000 


? 


90 


8.13- 


6 


4 


3 


i;- 


40.7 






250 


420 


.. 




20,000 


3 


75 


53.406 


135 


37 


22 


194 


* 27I4I 




Ufa 


509 




1 


700,000 


4 


75 


48.004 


180 


46 


31 


257 


27I4 




77 


562 




1 


312,000 




75 


41,615 


112 


30 


IC 


152 


2714 






110 


370 




1 


200,000 


6 


70 


108, 600 


140 


40 


25 


205 




SO 2712 




160 


1,200 


-. 




240,000 






S303, 982 


713 


177 


101 


991 






3.146 


7 


1,592,000 




$0 77 












$0 31.3 


$0 27 1-2 





140 































* Price paid up to April 1, when all mines at Pana suspended rather than pay scale price 
of 40 cents. 



186 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Greene County— Fifth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 




Description. 


Output. 


1 
s 

p 


Postoffice. 




O o 


a 

a 

■M 


-3 

o 

.a 

CO 


-3 

.a 
o 

£ 

o 


1 

o 
-a 
g 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


1 

1 

Tons 
Tons 1 of 
of lump, other 
grades 


1 


J. T. Revis. lessee.... 
Jas. Minks 


Roodhouse ... 

Whitehall .::: 


27 
20 
50 

47 
50 
60 


4.6 
2.4 
2.6 
4.6 
4.6 
2.3 




Sh. 
SI. 
Sh. 


Ho. 
Hd 
Ho. 


M. 


2.340 
220 
1,340 
2.140 
1,280 
1,200 


2,340 

220 


8 


E.Griffiths 


1.3401 


4 

5 
6 


Thos. Griffiths No. 1.. 

No. 2.. 

Hudson, Tucker & Co. 

Totals 


2.1401 

1,2801 

1.200 




8,520 


8 520l 













































* Coal pocket, cannel and bituminous coal. 
Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 5. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 6. 



Jei'sey County— Fifth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator, 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

i 


ID 

T 

1 

o 
o 

p. 


h 

o a 
a =3 


■o 
3 

a 

Is 
ti 

o 


o 

s 

o 

"a 

U2 


T3 

a 
ca 

/a 
o 

o 

s ^ 

03 


13 
1 

o 
c 

s 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Richard Motley 

Totals 


Delhi. . .. 


25 


2.6 


1 


SI. 


Hd 


M. 


1,680 


1,680 












1,680 


1,680 

















































Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 1. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



187 



Greene County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes 


1 Wages. 




§ 

1 


i 


ACCI- 

d'nts 






p,« 




4, 


a I g 














2.9 




IT. 


3 o 




Price paid per 


§3 


§• 


s 








.as 








^ 


tc 


gross ton. 


^t 


c 




Capacity 




























©■5 


Aggregate 
value 


5 
a 


!^ 


-1; 
>> 


1 


a 


i 


2S 


1 


'■$■ 

% 


1 


mine- 
tons. 




2«s 


of total 


s 


a s 


s, 




»3 . 


^ . 


9*^ 








"eS 






^1 


product. 


^1 


0,0 




15 


I. 5 


II 


2-3 








"^ 


1 




2 


^- 




S^ 


S^ 


^s 


^ 


&h" 


£S 


fcS 


Q 


^ 


^ 


iz; 






$125 


S2.925 


4 












S-M 


'>W 








2,800 










8P4 

81 14 






110 
''10 








600 


3 
4 

5 
6 


1 251 1.675 
1 25 2,675 
1 25 1.600 
1 25 1,500 














1,000 


4 




5 


621^ 




' ' 


995 








2,600 


ii:-;:::| 1 


3 


62 12 






'^10 








1,800 


5 


81 '4 






165 








2,400 










1 ' «in fic^n 




23 
















11,200 






1 




$0 68'/2 






193 














1 1 
















Jersey County, iSi>S— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 







Acci-i 

d'nts 




II 

.5 2 




2 

<0 


§ 


> 




Price paid 
per gross ton. 


23 





3 




;Capacity 




ol 


Aggregate 




H 


-•" 


^ 




^Z 


> 


-3 




of 










^? 


value 
of total 




si 


. 


a 


=^6i 


^6i 


a '^ 


u 


a 




_; tons. 


a> 


ii 


product. 


n.O 


OJ si 




S 


^a 


32 


S^ 












a 




! =1 




Oi 


Is 


«.s 


".S 


-^2 




s 


"S 






>p, 


R 


'::'o 


= 61 







'^ 


sS S 


0! 




Is! 




z 


<j 


! ^ 





< 


H 


&< 


^ 


a. 


^ 


w 


fa 


^ i 


1 


$1 25 


1 

$2, 100 4 






4 


$1 00 




w. 


^0 








2,000 








- 










$2, 1001 4 






4 










2.000 




$125 


1 








$1 00 






210 












1 





















188 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Morgan County— Fifth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 




1 


1 

OS 

".a 

ii 


a 


T3 



<V 

1 

to 


1 

. 

.a I- 


1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


s 






a 


II 


"0=1-1 


cS 


fo 


a 
































^ 






Q 


^ 




IB 


ryj 


S 








, 


P. Wag-staffe 


Murryville.. . . 


fin 


4.0 


5 


Sh 


Ho 


AT 


1,800 


1,800 






Totals 
















1,800 


1.800 























1 
























1 





Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 1. 



Macoiqnn County — Fifth District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 






Output. 




u 
Xi 

a 

s 


<2 
I 

o 
,a 
p. 
Q 


1 

1? 

MHO 

o_fl 
a. C 

a cs 

II 

en 


a 
a 
a 

O K 


5 

-a 

o 

p. 
_o 

02 


.a 
© 

Jl 


1 

O 

1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 


Consol. Coal Co .No. 6 

No,7 

No. 8 

No.lO 

Gillespie 

Hornsby 

Carlinville Coal Co... 

Nilwood Carbon C.Co. 

O'GarraKingCoalCo. 

Girard Coal Co 

Virden Coal Co 

Chi. Virden C.C.No.l 

Madison Coal C. No. 5 

Wm.Neil &Co., lessee 

Sam Curtis 

.1. T. Harbaugh 


Staunton 

Mt. Olive!"!.' 

Gillespie','!!!! 

Hornsby 

Carlinville ... 

Nilwood 

Greenridge... 

Girard 

Virden 

Mt. Olive ! ! ! ! ! 
Bunker Hill.. 
Rockbridge .. 
Chesterfield . . 

Posterburg.!! 
Chesterfield.. 


322 
360 
410 
431 
355 
388 
290 
325 
350 
354 
320 
320 
435 
250 
55 

"75 


6 

6.8 

8 

8 

7 

6.6 

6 

6 

6 

6.6 

7.6 

7.6 

8 

5.6 

5.6 

5 

5 

3.9 

5.6 


5 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

■"5 


Sh. 
D. 


S. 

Ho. 
Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 


M. 

?; 

M. 
B. 

M. 


171,200 

77,873 

143, 772 

118,579 

50.244 

32, 797 

39,078 

24,550 

103,400 

88,971 

89,871 

177,623 

139,817 

6,046 

420 

225 

80 

140 

150 

90 


120, 490 

55,381 

95,433 

82,505 

37, 226 

26,634 

23,447 

19,640 

58,000 

65,547 

46,322 

96.342 

102,800 

4,348 

420 

225 

80 

140 

150 

90 


50. 710 
22,492 
48,339 
36,074 
13,018 

6,163 
15,631 

4,910 
45, 400 
23,424 
43.549 
81.281 
37,017 

1,698 


18 
19 


Robt. McCormick .... 




20 


W.H. A. Bodi 

Totals 






1,264,926 


835,220 


429,706 




Averages 











































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 17. 

Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 3. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 20. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



189 



Morgan Couniij, iSi'S— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


.§ 
2 

o 

(U 

1 

o 

1 


1 

o 


Acci- 

den's 






1 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 

a 

S 


1 

11 

0)0 

utt, 


1 

o 


o 

p. 

s 

1 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 


1 

ll 


1 


1 

S3 
O 


Capacity 

mine- 
tons. 


a 

3 




.9 

ll 


1 


$1 60 


$2. 700 


3 




1 


* 


$0 87i2| 


S-M. 


286 








4,000 






- 









$1 50 


$2,790 


31 


1 


4 








4,000 




$0 871^ 






286 














1 



















Macoupin County, 1898 Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 




g 




Acer- 




















■;: 










t.s 




1 § 


> 
o 




Price paid 


85 


si 













.52 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


2 : ^ 


ii 

= 5) 


O 

a 


per gross ton. 


IS 

1 


> 

i 

o 

>> 

03 


■a 


's 


1 

o 


Capacity 


1 

2 


a 

a . 

da 


II 


'6 
a 

'a 


i 

-gbi 

2-S 

2 c 

o S 


mine- 
tons. 


■A 


<; 




^ O 


< 


&H 


fe 


^ 


£ 


Q 


W 


&H 


•^ 




1 


so 90 


$123,654 


164! ^S 


22 


234 




$0 33 


S.M, 


125 


807 




.. 


360,000 


2 


90 


56, 590 


80 


34 


17 


131 




33 




122 


419 




1 


195.000 


3 


90 


100,391 


164 


52 


20 


236 




33 




132 


648 


1 


1 


300.000 


4 


90 


85.077 


121 


61 


18 


200 




33 




122 


527 


2 


204.000 


5 


95 


39,921 


70 


25 


15 


110 




33 




122 


314 


1 ■* 


135,000 


6 


95 


27,459 


48i 22 


13 


83 




33 




94 


234 


i! 


120,000 


7 


80 


22,665 


6(1 


11 


10 


81 


*$0 40 






162 


1,000 


1 




140,000 


« 


65 


13.748 


50 


7 


6 


63 


t 3212 






125 


642 






54,000 


9 


70 


59,760 


125 


14 


10 


149 


3212 






152 


2.500 




6 


250,000 


10 


75 


58,530 


100 


20 


12 


132 




33 




150 


1,300 






200,000 


11 


70 


49,845 


()() 


16 


U 


93 


33 12 






128 


1,960 


■ ■i 1 


250,400 


12 


60 


74. 061 


244 


39 


26 


309 


3212 






126 


4,482 


,. 3 


.380.000 


13 


65 


79, 776 


159 


47 


25 


231 





33 




136 


680 






360,000 


14 


1 12.5 


5,740 


ti 


2 


3 


13 




33 


w. 


21(1 


60 






25,000 


15 


1 25 


525 


2 




1 


3 


75 






120 


21 






1,000 


16 


1 25 


281 


2 






2 


75 






11V 


9 






500 


17 


1 25 


100 


1 






1 


75 






45 


3 






400 


18 


1 25 


175 


2 








75 






,50 


5 






450 


19 


1 25 


187 


2 




1 


3 


75 




S-M. 


60 


6 






600 


V(l 


1 25 


112 


1 






1 


75 




w. 


75 


4 


•• 




400 














S798, 597 


1.4691 398 


210 


2,077 










15 621 


31 *>:? 


2 976 750 




SO 72.5 












$0 33.1 


$0 33 




118 












1 

















* From July 2. 1897, until April 1, 1898, 32 12 cents; from April 1,1898. to July 1.1898. 40 centi 
t Price paid to April 1. when mines wereclosed ratherthan pay scale price of 40 cents. 



190 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Montgomery Countij — Fifth District — 1898. 





Name of Opei-ator. 




Description. 


Output. 


1 

1 


Postoffice. 


0) 

I 

o 
p. 


1 

h 

.a 
".2 

ll 


a 

a 

Is 

O m 

C5 


-c 


cu 
0. 
© 

.a 
a? 


1 

. 


3 


a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


Coffeen Coal & C. Co. 
Hillsboro Coal Co .... 
Litchfield M. & M. Co. 
Litchfield M, & P. Co. 
Montgomery Coal Co. 
Raymond M. Co 


Coffeen 

Hillsboro 

Litchfield 

Paisley ...'.'.'.'. 
Raymond 


534 
440 
500 
684 
534 
434 


8 

7.6 

2:1 
L 


5 
5 

5 


Sh. 


S. 


B. 
Bo. 
M. 
B. 

M. 


170,000 
54.609 
12. 400 
43,020 
10,638 
4,000 


113.000 
36,355 
8,400 
30.820 
7.980 
3,000 


57,000 
18,254 
4,000 
12.200 
2.658 
1,000 




Totals . 


294,667 


199 555 


q;; 110 




Averages 








1 
















1 









Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 5. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 6. 



Scott Countij —Fifth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 
1 


T 
1 

o 
ft 




1- 



Is . 

11 
1^ 


u 
o 

s 

o 
03 


§ 

.a 

l 

o 

.a ■ 

§1 


3 
o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

3 


Wm. H.Bates & Co.. 

.Jackson Jones 

Wm. Parker! 


Winchester.. . 
Alsey ".' 


96 2.6 

.... 2.6 

2.6 


1 


ft 

" 


™ 


B. 


19,955 
386 
204 
752 
40 


19, 155 
386 
204 
752 
40 


800 


4 

5 


Chas. McGuire 

W. Armitage 




2.6 
2.6 




Exeter 








Totals 










21, 337 


20, 537 


800 




Averages 

































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 7. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 2. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 5. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Montgomery County, iS5S— Concluded. 



191 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages, 


I 

1 
ft 
o 

I 
o 

>i 

Q 


1 

3 

a 

o 
<» 

&t 

M 


Acci- 
den's 






.aa 
»^ 

.So 

es O 

> a 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 

£ 
a 

a 

°^ 

da 

2; 


l| 

ao 

:^ 

o 


1 

%i 

a 3 

0,0 
S St 

<: 


>> 
o 

ft 

g 


Price paid per 
gross ton. 


a3 
^^ 

JZ o 


1 


a 
o 


Capacity 


a 

2; 


13 

st 


II 

1'^ 


of 
mine- 
tons. 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 


»,5 

75 

1 00 

75 

90 

125 


$107, 550 
34.568 
10.400 

"'8;378 
4,250 


■51 

21 
65 
26 
10 


35 15 
15 15 

9 7 
91 10 
5i 7 
2 4 


160 
115 

37 
84 
38 
16 


$0 40 

40 

48 

t 40 

35 


*... 

'kHi'm" 


S-M. 


250 
155 
215 
200 
250 
180 


2.600 
470 
15 
1,500 
150 
50 


- 


.... 
.... 


250. 000 
240. 000 
60,000 
100, OOO 
62, 500 
50,000 







$193, 141 


317 


75 58 


450 




~ 


4,785 




$0 77.4 


$0 40.2 


$0 50 




208 




— 


1 








1 


1 












* No mining price returned; estimated at 30 cents in recapitulation sheet, 
avelag.s sl cint^" ^''^^ ^' ^897. to Aprill. 1898: 40 cents from April 1, 1898. to .July 1, 



Scott County, iS^S— Concluded. 





1 

I Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


i 

i 
S 

o 

1 

CO 

>a 


i 

3 

u 

% 


s 


Acci- 






Av. value of lump 
per tou at the mine 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 

t 

% 

a . 

d ft 
>5 


a 

3 

o-d 

li 

6~ 


t \ 1, . 


P 

a g 
1^ 








1 . 

ai' i 

4, O , — 


f rice paid per 
gross ton. 


1 


03 


:2; 


Capacity 


a 

3 


3 


Is 


of 
mine- 
tons. 


1 

3 
4 


$130 .$25, 301 ' 38 3 
150 570| 2 


e: 47| $0 80 

, 2 100 


S-M. 1.307 
" 110 


837 






25.000 
500 
500 


1 50 1, 128; 3 
175 ) 70) 1 




:::■•• 


1 00 

100 

100 , 




90 
160 
70 








5 




..:::: i 


1.000 




$27,375 46 3 


6 55 




837 


- 


— 


27, 200 




$131 


1 ! 
1 1 


$0 81.3 






147' 

1 


...... 




1 1 










■■[■■■■| 





192 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Sangamon County — Fifth District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Desckiption. 


Output. 


1 

s 


1 

1 

1 

a 
<v 


11 


a 

u 


U 

o 

m 

m 


-a 

i 
s ^ 

1^ 


-2 

1 
% 

o 
■a 
a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


. 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
IS 
19 
30 

1 

23 
24 

25 
26 

27 


Auburn Coal Co , 

C.-Virden C. Co. No. i! 
Barclay C. & M. Co... 
Cantrall Coop. C. Co.. 
M. & Senseney, lessee 
Wabash Coal Co 

B. Diamond C.&T. Co 
■Junction Mining Co.. 
Woodside Coal Co.... 
Horse Creek Coal Co. 
S. &. P. P. Coal Co ... 
Clear Lake Coop. C.Co 
Riverton C. Co. No. 1. 

'• No. 2. 
Spaulding Coal Co ... 

C. Coop. C. Co. No. 1. 

No. 2. 
Citizens' CM. Co.-'A" 
"B ' 
Sangamon Coal Co... 
Springfld Coop. C.Co. 
Springfld CM.&TCo 
Starne's Coal M. Co. 
Springfld Iron Co.,les 
West End Coal Co.... 
Williamsville C. Co.. 
Golladay & Brandt... 

Totals 


Auburn 

Barclay 

Cantrall 

Chatham 

Dawson 

lies Junction. 

Springfield... 

Pawnee 

Pit. Plains.... 

Bissell 

Riverton 

Spaulding — 
Springfield... 

Ridgely....'!'.'. 
Springfield... 

Ridgely...;;!! 

Springfield... 
Williamsville 
Salisbury 


268 
280 
249 
213 
259 
259 
245 
250 
250 
324 
129 
220 
200 
232 
238 
240 
240 
210 
2U5 
265 
250 
250 
250 
245 
150 
269 
150 


7.6 
7.6 
5.9 
6 

7 

5.4 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

7 

5.6 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.6 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.9 

5.8 

5.8 

5.8 


5 
5 
5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

5 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 

1 

5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 


Sh. 




B. 


20,000 
105, 106 
72,004 
95.268 
27,968 
75.281 
90,400 
45.300 
78.998 
10.839 
11.400 
55.650 
"B" 


10.000 
53.604 
58, 624 
82,671 
18,645 
48,933 
72,400 
35,300 
65,844 
9,938 
8.950 
41.740 


10, 000 
51,502 
13, 380 
12,597 

9,323 
26,348 
18,000 
10.000 
13. 154 
901 

2.450 
13,910 


162, 862 
61.049 
23, 000 
96, 770 

152, 415 


ii5.273 
45. 788 
20.000 
75.650 

100, 135 


15! 261 
3.000 
21.120 
52. 280 


92.077 
65.280 
89, 235 
112.777 
99. 142 
61.826 
56.006 
3.210 


73,884 
49,000 
61,969 
73,305 
73,362 
50,685 
37, 092 


18. 193 
16.280 
27.266 
39, 472 
25, 780 
11.141 
18, 914 
330 




1.763,863 


1,285,672 


478. 191 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 26. ■ 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 27. 
"B" Riverton Coal Co. No. 1 not worked during the year. 
* Output of shaft '"B" included in that of shaft "A". 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



193 



Sangamon County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 


5 


Acci- 


















■■" 


den's 






- 0.0, 

E.9 




S 
» 


3 


o 




Price paid 




S 


I 1 I 






.Ha 












per gross ton. 


5? S 












"1 


Aggregate 
value 
of total 


OJ 

a 

a . 




i 


a 






« 

> 


1 

D. j 




Capac- 




■6 

a 


.2 


ity of 
mine- 
tons. 


a 


product. 


OP. 




11 


o 


"•3 

Sa 


*.3 

a 3 
sa 


2 a 


o 




a 

a 
o 




z 


< 




^ 


6 


< 


H 




fe 


i 


Q 


\^ fi 


Z 




1 


$0 80 


$10,000 


25 


6 


4 


35 


so 40.7 


t S-M. 


1.50 


1 1 
600L.i.... 


40, COO 


a 


60 


42,463 


123 


18 


13 


154 


37.7 




105 


3,663 


l! 7 


320,000 


a 


79 


50.996 


70 


12 


10 


92 


40.7 


j ' ' 


214 


2.400 




180,000 


4 


66% 


57,947 


75 


19 


9 


103 


40.7 


' ' 


235 


3,H52 


j 


175,000 


5 


75 


16,314 


30 


5 


6 


41 


40.71 > " 


110 


800 


..!. . 


75,000 


6 


80 


49,686 


72 


17 


10 


99 


40.71 




143 


2.566 


1 


200.000 


7 


75 


61.500 


80 


14 


16 


110 


40.7 






210 


2,9U0 


1 


190.000 


a 


1 00 


39.300 


60 


7 


s 


75 


40.7 






1,50 


1.747 


..!.... 


182. .500 


9 


80 


57,937 


95 


16 


12 


123 


40.7 




" 


165 


2,646,.. 


1 


200.000 


10 


1 37.5 


14,002 


10 


4 


7 


21 


40.7 






212 


275l.. 




10.000 


11 


90 


8.790 


20 


4 


3 


27 


40.7 






200 


3501.. 




36.500 


12 


75 


36,869 


37 


9 


9 


55 


40.7 




' ' 


220 


2.2251.. 




100.000 


13 


























100,000 


14 


73.6 


112. 987 


i45 


17 


22 


184 


40.7 




.S-M. 


210 


5,487 .. 




300.000 


15 


75 


40,445 


75 


32 


8 


95 


40.7 






152 


2, 348 






lUO.OOO 


16 


71 


14.620 


27 


6 


4 


37 


40.7 






215 


865 






30.000 


17 


85 


68.527 


75 


18 


12 


105 


40.7 






2;s5 


3.725 


.. 


2 


180,000 


IS 


74 


85.079 


155 


14 


13 


182 


40.7 






235 


5,472 




2 


220,000 


19 




























50,000 


20 


76 


61,792 


110 


16 


11 


137 


40.7 




S-.M. 


183 


3.277 


1 




31.0,000 


21 


80 


43,270 


60 


10 


10 


80 


40.7 







175 


2.105 




1 


120,000 


22 


75 


58,746 


80 


18 


17 


115 


40.7 






153 


3.038 




1 


220.000 


23 


75 


68. 794 


90 


28 


9 


127 


40.7 






1N3 


3.710 




1 


180,000 


24 


84.7 


68,583 


88 


32 


21 


141 


40.7 






240 


3.304 






190,000 


25 


90.3 


51. 581 


85 


10 


7 


102 


40.7 




' ' 


200 


1.995 






187.000 


26 


80 


35,348 


55 


10 


10 


75 


40.7 






175 


1,500 






150,000 


2^ 


1 50 


4,485 


4 

'i,'746 




1 


5 


40.7 




" 


225 


80 


.. 




7,000 






SI, 160, 064 


322 


252 


2.320 






60, 430 


2| 15 


4,043,000 




$0 78.2 












SO 40.4 






188 

































t 37.7 cents at all mines until April 1, 1833; 40.7 cants until .July 1, 1S9S, at all but one. 



■13 



194 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Shelby County -Fifth District— 1898. 



Description. 



Name of Operator, i Postofilce. 



as 



^^r.^r of lump. 



Tons 

of 
other 
grades 



MoweaquaO.M.&M.C. 

M. Brophy 

Kearney Bros 

.John Richardson 

B. F. Stretch 

Samuel laro 

John Stockdale 

Gallagrher & Sons .... 



Moweaqua 

Shelby ville... 



Robinson Cr'k 
Mode 



5Sh. 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 D. 
15 Sh. 



St. B.t 
Ho. M. 



62.628 
l,400l 
210j 
?.000 
810' 
420 
280 
640 



Totals ... 
Averages 



36,660 
1,400 
210 
2,000 
810 
420 
280 
640 



42,420 



X Both. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 12. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 4. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 8. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



195 



Shelby County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


§ 

> 

1 


1 


T3 
1 

a 
"0 
bo 


ACCI- 
d'nts 






■Si 

II 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


S 

1 
1. 

n 


0,0 

6^ 


1 


1 

P. 

s 

i 


Price paid per 
gross ton. 


if 

li 

g2 


1 


Capacity 
of 


1 
i 




i 


1 


1 


mine- 
tons. 


1 


$1 17 
200 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 
2 25 

1 75 

2 25 

$1 25.4 


$58,577 

2,800 

472 

4,500 

1.822 

945 

490 

1.440 


,5 

1 
5 
3 
2 
4 


31 

;;;;;; 



15 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


121 
5 
3 
6 
6 
4 
2 
5 


*S0 42.5 
1 37I2 
I37I2 
137112 
1 37I2 
13712 
1 00 
1 37I2 


t$0 25.5 


S._M. 


225 
210 
200 
220 
100 
200 
100 
90 


1.250 




1 


100.000 
3 200 


3 
4 








350 
4,000 


5 








3 000 


6 








'750 


7 










8 




1 








1.000 














$71,046 


100 


31 


21 


152 






1,250 


■■ 


1 


112 900 




$0 48.8 .SO 25.5 




108 





























* Paid 40 cents for hand mining for two-thirds of coal, and 42i-2 cents for one-third coal. 
t Paid 28 cents for machine mining for two-thirds of coal, and 25^2 cents for one-third coal. 



196 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Va 


LUES. 


























9-1 
























oS 






























County. 


'5 


a 


1 




a 

a 


Total 


Tons 


Tons 


Tons 
shipped. 


1 


1! 

25 


V 

a 




o 




fl 




a 


ions pro- 
duced. 


of lump 
coal. 


of other 
grades. 


Ih 


ID 0. 


r? 




(D 






a 












P 


ilQ. 




s 


p. 
p. 


OJ 


a 










rj 


ss 






















^■-a 








!z; 


a2 


S 


z 


< 










<° 


<*" 


Calhoun 

Christian... 


1 




1 






4 893 


4 893 






6,000 


$1 50 


S7 339 


6 


fi 








495,616 


317,878 


177, 738 


441,095 


1,592,000 


77 


303.982 




6 




6 


1 




8 520 


8,520 






11, 200 


1 25 


10, 650 


Jersey 

Macoupin... 


1 




1 






1,680 


1,680 






2,000 


1 25 


2,100 


20 


13 


7 


3 




1,264,926 


835.220 


429,706 


1.116,363 


2,976,750 


72.5 


798,597 


Montgome'y 


6 


6 




1 




294,667 


199,555 


95,112 


246,857 


762,500 


77.4 


193, 141 


Morgan 

Sangamon. . 












1,800 


1,800 






4,000 


1 50 


2,700 


25 


24 


1 


1 


2 


1,763,863 


1.285,672 


478, 191 


1,493,021 


4,043,000 


78.2 


1,160,064 


Scott 


5 


1 


4 




2 


21,337 


20.537 


800 


17,655 


27,200 


1 31 


27, 375 


Shelby 


8 
79 


1 
51 


7 
28 


8 


4 

8 


68,388 


42,420 


25,968 


51,376 


112.900 


1 25.4 


71,046 


Totals 


3,925,690 


2.718,175 


1,207,515 


3,366,367 


9.537,550 




$2,576,994 


Averages 






















$0 80 




















1 







Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 79. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 8. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 8. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 79. 



GOAL IN ILLINOIS. 



197 



Fifth District— 1898. 



Employes. 


o 

•a 

u 
it 


1 
o 


Casualties. 


Wages. 


Machines. 


a 

a 

"o 
u 

1 • 


a 
1 

o 

II 


1 

a 

4) 

o 


'6 
S 




o 


2 


Average 
pergro 

For 

band 

mining:. 


price paid 
ss ton. 

For 
machine 
mining. 


a 

is 

al 
1 = 


a 

1 

a 
o 


.a 

II 


8 


9 

278 
5 

60S 
133 

1 
574 

9 
52 


17 

991 

23 

4 

2,077 

450 

4 

2,320 

55 

152 


258 
140 
193 
210 
118 
208 
286 
188 
147 
168 


175 
3.146 












$0 52 
27.5 


1 

1 


1 

14 


4,893 


713 

18 




7 






$0 31.3 

1 00 
33.1 

«... 

87.5 
.0.. 
81.3 

48.8 


180.000 


4 




















1.469 

317 

3 


15.621 

4.785 


3 


23 
2 






33 
50 


10 
2 


108 
6 


822. 336 
13,000 


1.746 


60.430 

837 

1,250 


2 


,5 














46 










100 




1 






25.5 


1 


4 


34.449 








4,424 


1.669 


6.093 


191.6 


86,244 


5 


48 










15 


133 1 n.=;i fi7« 








$0 38.7 


$0 31.95 





























COAL IN ILLINOIS. 199 



SIXTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1«98. 

Counties: St. Clair, Madison, Clinton, Marion, Bond. 
John Dunlop, Inspector, Centralia. 

Hon. David Ross, Secretary, 

State Bureau of Labor Statistics, Sprtnqjicld, Illinois: 

Sir: — In comi)liance with section 12 of the general mining law of the State 
of Illinois, I have the honor to submit to you the annual report of the Sixth 
Inspection District for the year ending July 1, 1898, the same being the third 
annual report for the Sixth district as at present defined, and the fifteenth 
annual report for the general region comprising the coal producing counties 
of St. Clair, Madison, Clinton, Marion and Bond. 

This report gives tabulated statements, by counties, of the number of mines 
operated during the year, showing the average number of miners and other 
employes: the total output of all grades of coal; the average value of coal at 
at the mine, and the aggregate value of total product; the number of shipping 
and local mines; the casualties in and around the mines; the average number 
of days worked; the quantity of powder used: the number of machines in use, 
and the total tons produced by machines. 

The following summary, as taken from the statistical tables, is given for the 
fiscal year 1898: 



Number of counties iu which coal is produced 5 

Total number of mines 98 

Shippius mines 72 

Local mines 26 

New mines 1 

Abandoned mines 4 

Total tonnage ;j, 459, 932 

Tons of lump coal 2, 713. 399 

Tons of other ffrades 746, 533 

Tons shipped 3, 021. 521 

Estimated capacity in tons of existing mines 7,180.900 

Average value of lump coal per ton at the mine $0,746 

Aggregate value of total product S2. 248, 733 

Number of miners 3,445 

Number of other employtjs 1, 217 

Total employi's 4,662 

Average number of days of active operation for all mines 182 

Numl)er of kegs of powder used 70, 760 

Fatal accidents 8 

Non-fatal accidents 75 

Number of widows 7 

Number of orphans 20 

Number of mines using machines 20 

Number of machines in use 129 

Total tons cut by machines 1,125,5111 

Number of tons produced to each fatal accident 432.491 

Number of tons produced to each non-fatal accident 46. 132 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident 583 

Number of persons employed to each non-fatal accident 62 



200 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Coal production by couuties, with increase or decrease in each year for the 
years ending June 30, 1897, and 1898: 





Total Output 
Grades of Coal- 


OF All 

-IN Tons. 


Increase. 






1898. 


1897. 




St Clair 


1,600,752 
630, 769 
417.584 
714,513 
96,314 


1,718.194 
780,921 
328,184 
626.850 
104,256 




117,442 






150, 152 


Clirton 


89, 400 
87.663 










7,942 








Total 


3,459,932 


3.558,405 


177,063 


275, 536 






Decrease 


275,336 




177, 063 












98 473 







The counties of St. Clair, Madison and Bond show a decrease of 275,536 
tons from that of last year, 1897; Clinton and Marion show an increase of 
177,003 tons in the same time. 

This is owing to the fact that the mines at Centralia, in Marion county, only 
lost 20 days during the general strike, and that the Odin mine lost no time by 
said strike. 

The Breese coal mine lost but 19 days and the Consolidated Coal Company, 
at the same place, lost 32 days. The same number of days was lost at Tren- 
ton mines, caused by the general strike. 

Considering that the mines at Centralia, Marion county, have not been 
working, nor the mine at Sandoval, since the first of April, 1898, they have 
lost in the number of days a number equal to that lost in St. Clair, Madison 
and Bond counties during the long strike in the earlier part of the year. 
They worked during the period of the year when the demand for coal is 
greatest. As a rule, during the spring and summer months the work is not 
more than half time. Therefore, the strike at the above named mines at the 
present time has had very little effect on the capacity of the mines for the 
past fiscal year. 

Labor Troubles. — Since the inauguration of the general strike July 1, 1897, 
the district has not been free from strikes at any one time during the year. 
My own observation is that strikes are a severe measure to accomplish any 
desired result; they involve great distress and hardship to all those interested, 
both directly and indirectly, in mining, and not alone to miners or operators, 
but to many others, owing to the close relation of the coal trade with the in- 
dustrial and commercial world. 

The results attained by the late general strike have been phenomenal. It 
has completely revolutionized the wage system in this district. All mines 
working in the district at the present time are paid by the ton, weighed be- 
fore screening, with the exception of one mine, where machine men and 
shooters are paid by the day, the loaders only being paid by the ton. 

The mines jit which there are strikes at the present time are those of the 
Pittenger &. Davis Mining and Manufacturing Companj', and of the Centralia 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 201 

Miuiiig aud Mauufacturiiif? Coiupauy, at Centralia, and the Sandoval Coal 
Company, Sandoval, in Marion county. They have been on strike since April 
1. 1898. 

The mine of the Sorento Prospecting and Manufacturing Company, Sorento, 
Bond county, has not been worked for the last two months. 

Messrs. Tirre & Sons, Lenzburg, St. (^lair county, have only been working 
a few men since April. 

New Mines in Contemplation. — The Henriette Coal Company, Edwardsville, 
has sunk a new shaft at Edwardsville, on the C, P. & St. L. railroad. The 
coal was struck at a depth of 18-4 feet 6 inches; the thickness of coal is 7 feet. 
A nice tipple has been built with all the modern improvements. 

A new shaft is being sunk at New Baden, on the L. E, & St. L. railroad, 
by the Muren Coal and Ice Company of Belleville. The expectations are that 
they will strike the Trenton seam. 

A few of the citizens of Germantown have organized a stock company and 
are sinking a new^ shaft about half a mile east of the town on the L. E. & St. 
L. railroad. Much trouble has been experienced in sinking through quick 
sand, but they have got through it safely and are making good progress. 

The Home Trade Coal Company of Edwardsville has sunk a shaft at 
Edwardsville, solely for local tiade, as it is not located on any railroad. 

A new shaft has been sunk at Marissa, by the Eureka Coal Company. The 
depth of the shaft is 114 feet; thickness of coal 6 feet; commenced sinking 
December 1, 1897; struck coal January 27, 1898. 

Inijirovements. — The Mount Olive and Staunton Coal Company has completed 
its escapement shaft and has erected a new fan, improving the ventilation, 
which was needed very mucli. This shaft wan formerly owned by Henry 
Voge, of Staunton, and was ventilated by the hoisting and lowering of the 
cages and the action of doors that were moved back and forward as necessity 
required. By this method the ventilation was insufficient for the number of 
men at work. The present company is putting in electric cutting and drilling 
machines, which are being installed by the Jeffrey Electric Company. 

The Madison Coal Company has erected a new fan at the No. 4 Glen Carbon 
mine. The diameter of fan is 20 feet, built so that it can be used for either 
exhaust or discharge. 

Electric drilling machines have been put in at the mines of the following 
companies during the latter part of the fiscal year: The Tirre & Sous Coal 
Co., Lenzburg, has put in two drills. The Johnson Coal and Manufacturing 
Company has put in one drill at the "O. K." mine. 

The Hippard Coal Company, Belleville, has put in two drills. 

These mines are the first in this district to put in electric drills to shoot off 
the solid, and they have given satisfaction up to the present time. 

The Centralia Mining and Manufacturing Company has put in an electric 
plant installed by the Jeffrey Electric Company. The plant consists of five 
cutting machines, three drills and one locomotive which weighs eight tons, 
the whole making a complete outfit. This will make it one of the best 
e(|uipped mines in the Sixth district. 



202 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

The following shafts have been retirabered during the last year: The 
Millstadt shaft, the Skellet Coal Company's shaft, the Lumaghi Coal Com- 
pany's shaft. 

The Hydraulic Pressed Brick Company has commenced mining coal at their 
shaft. They have hoisted about 5,000 tons. Their return came too late to be 
placed on the tabulated report. This company has organized a coal company 
known as the Independent Coal Company, CoUinsvilb. The shaft is located 
near Cantine. 

Escapement shafts are in progress as follows: At the mine of the Trenton 
L. & P, Coal Company, Trenton. The Kinmundy Coal Company's escape- 
ment shaft is down 200 feet. The contract is let to Frank Seymour to put it 
down. The progress at the Salem mine is slow, but they are working at it 
with a small force. 

I notice in the last year's report of the Sixth district that a change had 
been made with regard to the geological number of the seams at the Troy, 
Brookside, Trenton, Bennett and Darrow mines. In the opinion of my pre- 
decessor, Mr. Cumming, the seams at all these places present the same char- 
acteristics and should all be reported as the No. 7 seam, and not the No. 6, as 
they have been generally cr^'usidered. Upon examination of the fossils, and of 
the general character of the formation at these points, I am disposed to agree 
with Mr. Cumming, and have consequently designated the seams at the mines 
named as No. 7. 

Fatal Accidents .— a \i\y 13, 1897, at the Bennett mine near Lebanon, be- 
longing to the Lebanon Coal and Machine Association, Peter Hoppen, a 
loader, di'opped dead while at work. He was loading a car with coal. The 
entry in which the rooms were located where he had worked that morning 
was driven 400 feet ahead of the air. Four rooms and a cross cut were 
being worked inside of the last cross cut. The rooms were all new and were 
just being widened out. They were mined by machines and the blasting was 
done about 4 o'clock in the morning by the night shift, about four shots to 
each room. The only ventilation available while mining the rooms was the 
exhaust from the machines; but as the compressor stopped when the night 
shift quit work, there was no provision made for removing the obnoxious 
gases generated by the explosion of powder used for shooting the coal. As 
the place was insufficiently ventilated when the work started at 7 o'clock 
in the morning, the air could not possibly be fit for respiration. Mr. Hoppen 
complained to his partner of his head, and assigned the condition of the air 
as being the cause. He had worked in the first room inside of the last cross 
'cut all the morning up to 11:30 a. m., and had just moved into the next room 
with his partner, 80 feet further in the entry, where he had worked about ten 
minutes. He suddenly fell over backwards. His partner immediately gave 
the alarm and called for help, which was prompt in responding, and he was 
carried back to the air course, where every effort was made to revive him, 
but he expired in a few minutes. The verdict of the coroner's jury was that 
death resulted from heart disease; this was verified by the circuit court in a 
suit for damages. He was 48 years old and leaves a widow and five children. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 203 

August 25,1897, at tlie escapement shaft of the Sandoval mine, Fred Heaver 
was hoisted up to the pulley and precipitated down the shaft, which was 000 
feet deep, and was instantly killed. The fireman or night watchman. W. H. 
Steiner, was to let him down to the pump, which needed some attention. In- 
stead of letting him down he hoisted him up by mistake, with the above re- 
sult. Deceased was GO years of age and leaves a widow and one child. 

October 9, 1897, Peter Vagge, a miner in the Turkey Hill or Moser mine, 
was instantly killed by a premature shot in the mine. His age was f)") years 
and he leaves a widow and six children. 

November 13, 1897, Fred F'elax,a loader in the Odin coal mine, was seriously 
injured by falling coal and died from the effects of it that same evening. He 
loaves a widow and four children. He was 48 years of age.' 

November 20, 1897, Richard Jones, a machine helper in the Bennett mine, 
near Lebanon, had his hips and back seriously injured by falling coal in the 
mine. He died four hours afterward from the effects of the injury. His age 
was 28 years, and he was unmarried. 

January 11, 1898, Louis Saler, a loader, was killed in the Centralia Mining 
and Manufacturing Company's mine. After loading his coal it is supposed 
that he started to cut down a piece of top coal. Over this piece of coal there 
was a large piece of sulphur rock. It was known to be dangerous. While in 
the act of cutting the coal the sleight of the above i-ock broke the coal sud- 
denly, which fell upon him, causing instant death. 

January 26, 1898, Chas. Denman, a driver, 26 years of age, married only 
a few months prior to his death, was killed by falling down the shaft of the 
Odin Coal Company, which is 714 feet deep. He had been working on the 
night shift. After his work was done, which was between 5 and 6 o'clock in 
the morning, he and another workman by the name of Walter Baugh were 
being hoisted out of the mine. Walter says that they had a light when the 
cage started, but that it went out while they were being hoisted. As it was 
still dark on top, they were unable to see when they got to the place where it 
was customary to let them off, which was the lower landing. The engineer 
said he must have had the cage eight or ten feet above the said landing when 
('harles Den ham stepped off of the cage. The force of his fall, stepping from 
such a height above the landing, must have caused him to stumble and fall 
back into the shaft. 

February 4, 1898, J. C. Sanderson, a loader in the Smithboro Coal Com- 
pany's mine, met his death while in the act of loading a car with coal at the 
face of the main entry, in the top seam. A large piece of rock gave way, fall- 
ing on him, from the effects of which he died shortly afterward. He was 30 
years old and leaves a widow and two children. 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Dunlop, 

Cbntr.alia. . State Inspector of Mines, Sixth District. 



204 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 

Fatal Casualties — Sixth District — 1898. 



Date. 


Name. 


i 

< 


Occupation. 


Residence. 


1 


1 


i 

3 


a 


§ 

a 


Cause of Accident. 


1897. 
July 13 
Aug. 25 




48 
60 
55 


Loader 

Engineer... 


Lebanon 

Sandoval 

Rentchler .. 
Odin 


1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


5 
1 
6 
4 


i 


6 

2 
7 
5 

2 
1 




Fred Heaver. 


Falling down shaf r 








Nov. 13 


Fred Felax 


48 Loader 


Palling coal 


■• 20 




2S 

37 
^6 
30 


Mach help'r 

Loader 

Driver 




1898. 
Jan. 11 

26 


Louis Saler 

Chas. Denman 


Centralia — 
Odin 


1 
1 
7 


1 
1 

7 


1 
19 


Falling coal and roof 
Falling down shaft . 


Feb 5 


J. C. Sanderson 


Falling roof 








1 b>6 



















Total fatal casualties. 8. 



Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — Sixth District — 1898. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty 


No. 


1 
Colliery. iNo. 


Centralia 

Lebanon 

Odin.. . . 




Driver 

Engineer 

Loaders 

Macii. helper. 
Miner 




Falling coal 

Falling coal &roof 
Falling down shaft 

Palling roof 

Fly'gcoal fr'm s'ht 
Heart disease 


1 

1 
2 
2 

1 
1 


Centralia M.&M. Co., 1 
Lebanon C.&M. Assn. 1 2 
Moser..J.W.-Turkey| 
Hill Mine I 1 




Odin Coal Co 2 


Smithboro.... 




Sandoval Coal Co — 1 
Smithboro Coal Co... i 1 


Totals 


8 


8 


8 


' 8 








! 



Non-Fatal Casualties — Sixth District — 1898. 



July 
Aug, 
Sept. 



Prank Iticker 

Wm Bohner 

Geo.Schief'rd'ker 

Ed Randle 

•Jno. Flannigan... 

Geo. Byers 

Church Emmet.. 

L. Ettween 

Hy Jauspn 

Nelson Jotmson . 
Thad Simpson.... 

Jas. Marckley 

Greely Estes 

(^eo. Grilley 

Wm. Ahlis 

R. F. Cates 

Alex White 

Adolph Rail 

Aug. Heinman... 
Hy Heidlebach... 

T.J. Victor 

Chas. Baker 

C. R Prickett.... 

M. Burkner 

Henry Forker.... 



Residence. 



25 Breese 

23 Trenton .... 
8i Freeburg . . . 

44| Belleville... 

SOlOdin 

42[Centrulia ... 
23| 

Central City 

Bre> se 

Centralia ... 

^^reese 

4u!0din 

■iO\ " 

24 Centralia... 
36iLenzburg. .. 

29 Odin 

:S5 Bell>-ville... 
21 iVlHSCKUtah.. 
33. Swansea — 
57 Belleville... 



CenTi 



Freeburg . 
Breese 



Character of Injur; 



Collar bone broken 

Back and hips bruised 

Shoulders and head bruised. 

Foot bruised 

Arm bruised and cut 

Finger smashed 

Finger cut off 

Ankle bruised 

Head and shoulders bruised. 

Hand bruised 

Hips bruised 

Ijeg broken 

Back and hips injured 

Leg injured 



Leg broken 

Back and hips bruised 

Arm fractured 

Hips bruised 

Leg broken 

.jBody injured 

. Shoulders bruised 

51 Foot bruised 

I Foot badly bruised 

61 Foot broken 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 205 

Non-Fcda I Casua Ities — Sixth District — 1898 — Concluded . 



Name. 



Character of lujury. 



33 



Feb. 
Mar 



Apr. 
May 



Richard Jacques. 

Sam Adams 

F. Braiidhorst 

Hy Church 

Arcliie Merry — 

Juo. Laskero 

Frank Stedon 

Theo. Ravendorf. 

Ben Kline 

Hy Marquln 

Alexander Smith 

Albert Rippy 

Chris Stolfels .... 



Wm. Westerner.. 

Geo. Sowmau 

L.Belleville 

Con Schmidt 

Wm. Bell.Sr 

Chas. Dunbach... 
Chas. Langestein 
Wm. Dornbuch... 

Rufu.s Frazer 

J no. Mooney 

Law Finklein 

Douglass Brock.. 

Aug. Ziegler 

John Simpson ... 

Ed Ferry 

John Scherer 

Wm. Jordan 

James Bailey — 
Philip Wright.... 

F. Drinkpohl 

A. Kaling 

A. Oilman 

Ben Englemeir .. 

Arch Peall 

Chas. Lewis 

(leo. Foster 

Hy Wehiage 

Hy Foecke 

Jno. Brisne 

Wm. Watson 

And. McClelland. 

Jno. Helman 

Harry Love 

Wm. Curtis 

P. Martinallie.... 
Wm. B. Green ... 
Louie Jolifif 



23|BelIeville... 

40iCentralia ... 

50| 

23 

40 

40|Collinsville. 

i9 Reutchler... 

49 Breese 

30 Centralia ... 
:«! Sandoval... 
20 Odin ........ 

32|Preeburg.... 

34| Centralia... 

20 Glen Carbon 
60 Belleville... 
34| "• .... 
56; Glen Carbon 
43 Staunton ... 
34 Belleville... 
48 

32 Trenton .... 
SO'Glen Carbon 
22 Belleville... 
22i Centralia ... 
42 

50 Odin 

40 • • 

22 Centralia ... 

..lOdin 

58 ReebSta.... 
25j Central City 
30l 

26 Breese 

54 Germant'wn 

38 

22 Odin 

21 " 

46 Staunton . . . 

19 Breese 

64 •• 

35' Staunton .. 
40;Odin 



Trenton 
Odin.... 



Staunton . . 

Marissa 

Kinmundy. 



Totals.... 44 



Shoulder bruised 

Back bruised 

Finger bruised 

Foot bruised 

Hand cut 

Leg and ribs broken.. 
Leg and side bruised. 

Leg fractured 

Wrist fractured 

Hip bruised 

Knee injured 

Ai-m broken 

Rib broken 



1 Body injured 

, .. Hips and back injured 

2 Body injured 

, . . Leg broken and double f rac. . . 

, .. Leg broken and triple frac 

, . . Hip injured 

. . . Thumb mashed 

, . . Leg bruised 

3 Leg broken 

6 Body injured 

. . . ILeg and body injured 

. . . I Body injured 

4 Foot broken 

6. Leg broken 

... .\ot s,tated 

. . . I Body injui-ed , 

2: Arm broken 

lOl Leg and hand bruised , 

3|Handcut 

, . . I Finger bruised 

. . . Leg broken 

2 Head, neck and arms bruised. 

5 

. . . Head and back injured 

. . . Body injured 

1 Leg broken 

. ..jBody injured 

el Back bruised 

2! Head bruised 



Rib broken and foot injured. 

Head injured 

Back and hips bruised 

Leg bruised 

Arm broken 

Ankle broken 

Body injured 



Not recovered. 



Total men injured 

Not reported July 1, 1898 

Not reported 

Number recovered 

Total time lost by men recovered 

Average time lost per man recovered 



75 
2 

1 
72 
2.547 days. 
35.4 •• 



206 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapituluiion of No7i-Fatal Casualties — Sixth District — 1898. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty 


No. 


Colliery. 


No. 


Belleville. 


9 

8 

16 
2 
3 

14 
3 


Blasters 

Cagers 

Drivers 

Foreman, asst 

Laborers 

Loaders 

Machinist 

Mach. runn'rs 

Miners 

Roadman 


2 
2 

23 
1 
6 

10 
1 
2 

27 
1 

75 


Cable 


1 

1 

'i 

2 
1 

1 
3 
1 

18 
3 
2 

23 
2 


Breese Coal Co 5 








Ceniral City . 


Drill . 


Consolidated Coal Co 8 


Centralia 

Collinsville... 

Preebiirg 

Germantown . 
Glen Carbon.. 
Kinnr.undy . . . 

Lenzburg 

Marissa 

Mascoutah — 
Odin.. 


Palling coal 

Palling coal, par... 
Palling coal, hands 
Palling coal, shaft. 
Palling from chute 
Palling f'm pit cars 

Palling prop 

Palling roof 

Plying coal 

Kicked by mules.. 


DonkBros 

Dutch Hollow C. Co.. 
Freeburg .Mfg. Co.... 
Highland Coal Co.... 

Hippard Coal Co 

Kinmundy Coal Co . . 
Kolb Coal Co 


2 


Krantz, Jacob 

Lumaghi Coal Co.... 
Madison Coal Co 




Missouri & 111. C. Co. 
Moser.J. (Turkey H.) 
Mt.O.&Staunt'nC.Co 
Murren C. & Iron Co. 
Odin Coal Co 




Rentchler. 


Pit cars 










Staunton 




14 


Trenton 


Oak Hill Coal Co 

Pettinger&D.Mfg.Co 

Sandoval Coal Co 

Summit Coal Co 

Tirre & Son Coal Co. 
West End Coal Co... 


11 


Totals .... 


75 


75 


75 













Table showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependerits, Time Lost, iviih Averages and Percentages — Sixth 
District. 





1 

c 
5 
2; 


s 


1^ 

u 

CO 


g 

-a 

CI 


Time Lost. 


o ^ 


Nature of In.juries. 


Total 1 ^l^l- 


g-c 

1* 


Ankle broken ... 


1 
1 

4 

1 
2 
4 
10 

1 

? 

4 
3 

8 
5 
1 

10 
8 
2 

1 
1 


2 

1 

1 
1 
5 

5 

3 

2 

\ 

8 
4 

1 

i 


1 

1 

2 

i 

3 
5 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
3 
2 

2 

4 
1 
1 


3 

1 

6 
2 
16 

■■■"23 

5 

3 
12 

J 

16 

1 

3 


100 
48 
290 
14 
43 
134 
187 
30 
163 
20 
52 
33 
202 
74 
14 
810 
143 
120 
20 
50 


100 
48 
72.5 
14 

21.5 
33.5 
18.7 
30 
27.2 
20 


1 35 




1.35 


Arms broken 


5 41 




1.35 


Backs injured 


2 7 




5 41 


Bodies injured . 


13 51 




1.35 


Feet injured 


8 11 




1 '« 


Fingers injured ... 


13 ! .'i 41 




11 

25.3 

14.8 

14 

81 

17.9 

60 

20 

50 


4.06 


Heads and shoulders injured . . . . 


10 81 




6.76 


Knee injured 


1 35 




13.51 


Leg.« injured 


10 81 


Ribs broken . 


2 7 




1 35 


Wrist fractured. 


1 35 


Not stated 


















75 


44 


31 


115 


2.547 


35.4 


100.00 







208 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Bond County—Sixth District— 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


i 

s 


i 
T 

1 

o 
n 


1 

o_g 
"■^ 

II 


la 

'if 

C5 


O 
1 

CO 


o 

la 

02 


o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 
2 


SorentoPros.&M.Co. 
Joseph Somers 

Totals.. 


Sorento 

Smithboro.... 


380 
490 


7.6 
4 


6 
6 


Sh. 


s. 


M. 
B. 


82,841 
13, 473 


62, 131 
11,673 


20,710 
1.800 




96,314 


73.804 


92 510 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 2 



Clinton County — Sixth District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


s 

2; 


T 
1 

o 

D. 

Q 


1 

Is 
II 


3 
a 

Is g 

o 


o 

t 

o 


1= 

Li 

o 

03 


1 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

3 
4 


Oonsolidated Coal Co. 
Trenton CL.&P.Co. 

Breese Coal Co 

Consolidated Coal Co. 

Totals.. 


Trenton 

Breese 


333 
335 
400 
400 


4.10 
4.10 
7.6 

8 


7 
6 
6 


Sh. 


s. 


B. 


92, 754 
39,735 
222. 765 
62, 330 


72,834 
29.8-!3 
199. 114 
45, 052 


19. 920 
9,912 
23.651 
17,278 




417,584 


346.823 


70,761 




Averages .. 









































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 4. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 4. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 

Bond County, :?S.9S— Concluded. 



209 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 


§ 




ACCI- 






















1 
a. 


. 


den's 










3 

a) 


a 


% 




Price paid 


h4 






1 












111 


% 




per gi-oss ton. 


?/^ 


o 










^S^ 


Aggregate 


S 


>a; 










<D 


1 






Capacity 




-i i o 


of 






value 




S'S 










'■^ 












2=s 


of total 


a 


23 




2 

-2 








a 




3 
Is 

1 


tons. 


a 




product. 




•-.in 


3l 
E 3 
_ ? 


For h 
mining 

For mac 
mining 


25 

So 

53 3 


o 

1 


o 
feu 


1 




^ 


$0 67 


$45,769 


100 


34 


16 


150 




$0 33 


S-M 


176 


» 




150.000 


2 


90 


11,405 


14 


* 


4 


22 


$0 43 






200 


600 


1 .... 


15,000 




$0 70.6 


$57, 174 


114 



38 


20 


172 


i 






1,450 


1 .... 


165 000 




$0 43J *$0 33 




188 


























Price paid until April, 30 cents per ton. 



Clinton County, iSi^S— Concluded. 



Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 



Price paid per 
gross ton. 



1 I ^^i 
S I ^2 



S2 



l§ 




Acci- 


1 ^ 




den's 














^ 


3 












-^ 






fe 




5 


a 




a-l 












la 


ro 












O 




Q 


^ 


^i^ 



Capacity 
of 



$1 15 
90 



$91,727 

28,823 60 

140,066 150 

38. 107 43 



$298,723 325 



S-M.i 161 
150 
290 
152 



631 

400 
5,288 
1,116 



,43!i 



.1 13 



200, 000 
05, 000 
200, 000 
180.000 

645,000 



14 



210 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Madison County — Sixth District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 




Output. 




1 

a 


i 
T 

1 

a 
Q 


X 

Is 
o J,; 

il 

.a ^ 


s 
Is 

o <v 


-a 

o 

a 
o 

i 


n 

OS 

XI 

o 

o 

;:' c 
n't 

2£ 


5 

o 
n 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 


C. C. Co.,AbbyNo.3.. 
Heinz Bluff 
Brookside 


Collinsville... 
Troy . . . 


146 
168 
278 
278 
275 
300 
110 
217 
130 
160 
150 
67 
100 
48 
50 
45 
80 
292 
30 
56 
35 
85 
65 


6 

6 

7 

7 

6.6 

6.6 

6.6 

7 

6 

5.6 

2.6 

5 

5 

6 

2.6 

7 

2.6 

3 

3 

4.6 

4 


6 
6 

6 
6 

t 

6 
6 
6 
6 

1 
6 
6 
6 

1 
6 
1 
1 

1 

t 


Sh. 


St. 
Ho. 


M. 
B. 

b: 

M. 

B. 
M. 

B. 

M. 


92,379 

66,327 

13, 148 

17,410 

10,272 

1,326 

130,284 

28,908 

86.216 

86,149 

3,628 

1,200 

1,000 

300 

450 

700 

1,320 

86,8.52 

400 

800 

300 

1,000 

400 


70,838 

48,822 

9,771 

13, 029 

8,560 

1.106 

98,715 

21.566 

64,916 

57,433 

3,128 

1,200 

1,000 

300 

450 

700 

1,320 

74, 128 

400 

800 

300 

1,000 

400 


2,.M1 

17,505 
3, 377 








4.381 


5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

10 
11 


No.12 

McDonald.. 

Madison C. Co., No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

Lumaerhi Coal Co 

WonderlyCoal Co*... 


Wordeu 

Glen Carbon.. 
Edwardsville. 
Glen Carbon.. 
Collinsville... 
Edwardsville. 

Beth alto 

North Alton.. 
More 


1,712 
220 
31.569 
7,342 
21,300 
28, 716 
500 


1? 


Malloy & Ball 




14 

15 


W. R. Richardson .... 
Lathy Yeager 




17 
18 
19 
20 
21 


Nathan Sydall 

tMt. 0. & S. Coal Co. 
JohnMcInally 


North Alton.. 

Staunton 

North Alton.. 

East Alton..!! 


■ 12,' 724 






Charles Kabe'l 




*>? 


John Spencer 


Bethalto 












630, 769 


479.882 


150, 887 
















































* Abandoned November, 1887. 

t This mine was owned and operated by Henry Voge during the first half of the year. 

Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 26. 

Number of mines exhausted or abondoned during the year, 3. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 23. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



211 



Madison County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 




i 




ACCT- 




















■+i 




den's 






S.2 




S 


3 


0- 

o 




Price paid per 


as 


p. 


'i 
















.5S 

a; 


Aggregate 


1 


•■V 


1a 


i 


gross ton. 


1! 


> 


-a 






Capacity 
of 




r^ 


i 




a; 03 


value 
of total 


a . 


-sy 


o . 
c s 






a 




§ 


s 




V 


tons. 


1 

s 

3 


^2 


product. 


da 




"o 


o s 


sa 


a^ 

'S c 


o 

i 


o 

1 


d 
^ 


1 




^ 


< 




:? 


O 


< 


tr* 


^ 


& 


Oh 


Q 


M 


fc 


^ 




1 


$0 85 


$66,674 


90 


26 


.0 


136 




$0 33 


R.-M. 


127 


517 






200,000 


2 


85 


46,750 


62 


19 


15 


96 




33 




123 


429 






150, 000 


ii 


1 15 


12,587 


39 


13 


8 


60 


SO 4C 




' ' 


54 


164 






90,000 


4 


1 15 


16, 735 


31 


16 


11 


58 




33 


' ' 


67 


143 






90,000 


t) 


80 


7,276 


30 


3 


3 


36 


4C 




' • 


78 


195 






60.000 


6 


80 


939 


2 


1 


1 


4 


4C 




' ' 


120 


11 






15,000 


7 


60 


70,278 


174 


26 


16 


216 




33 


' ' 


114 


876 




1 


360,000 


8 


1 00 


25,971 


30 


9 


6 


45 




33 


' ' 


192 


329 






200,000 


9 


60 


46,404 


75 


20 


10 


105 




33 




121 


715 




? 


300, 000 


lU 


75 


55, 125 


80 


10 


7 


97 


4C 




' ' 


200 


2.40(1 




2 


150,000 


11 


1 00 
125 
1 50 


3,378 
1,500 
1,500 


25 

I 


3 


3 

1 


31 
4 

. 5 


50 

75 

100 




W. 


80 
200 
200 


130 








V?. 






2 000 


13 








2,000 


14 


125 


375 


1 




1 


2 


75 






100 


3 






1,000 


1ft 


1 15 
1 25 
1 50 

87 


562 

875 
1,980 
64,359 

600 
1,200 

450 
1,500 

500 


3 

I 

80 


8 


2 

1 
1 
9 


5 
3 

97 


75 

75 

100 

40 




S.-M. 


200 
150 
200 
240 








600 


16 








1,000 


37 








1,500 


18 


2.170 




4 


200,000 


19 


150 
1 50 
1 50 
1 50 
1 25 


3 
3 

2 
4 
2 




1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


4 
4 

3 
5 
3 


1 00 
1 00 




W. 

" 


100 
200 
150 
160 
150 








500 


20 








1,000 


■31 


751 








500 


22 


75 

75 











1,500 


n 








800 






- 










$427,518 


751 


154 


121 


1,026 






8,082 


9 


1,827.400 




$0 77.9 












$0 41.3 


$0 33 




145 































212 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 



Marion County — Sixth Distrid^l898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 


T 
1 

o 
a* 


Thickness of coal- 
feet and indies. 

Geological number 
of seam. 


o 

.a 


a 

o 

I 

.a c 


1 

3 

u 
o 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 


Centralia M. & M. Co. 
Pitteng-er & Davis 

Min. &Mfg. Co 

Odin Coal Co 

Sandoval Coal Co 

Kinmundy Coal Co... 
Salem Coal Co 


Centralia 

Odin '.'.'..'.'. 


576 

637 
714 

871 
885 


6 

6 
4 
4 


6 


Sh. 


s. 


B. 

M. 
B. 
M. 


182,352 

176,758 
169,554 
152, 249 
23,100 
10,500 


141,151 41,201 

123,618 53,140 
139,5301 30,024 


i 
5 
6 


Sandoval 

Kinmundy — 
Salem 


6 

:::: 




91,350| 60,899 
16,000 7,100 
10,000 500 












Totals 




714,513 


521,6191 192,864 




Averagfes 








! 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 6. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 6. 





St. Clair Coiinty- 


-Six 


til 


District— 


-1898. 








Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

s 
z 


«2 

2 


a 

Q 


1 

!l 

o_g 

§3 
^^ 

II 




11 

i TS 
i U 
\ 

! K 

1 


§ 

.a 



jl 


•6 


1 

S-i 


a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 


Con. C. Co.. Richland. 
Con.C.Co.,Schureman 
Con.C.Co..G'rts'eNo.4 
Con. C. Co.. Gr'n Mo'nt 
Con. C. Co.. Pittsburg 
Con. C. Co.. Rose Hill 
Con. C. Co.. Marissa.. 
Con. C.Co., White Oak 
Con. C. Co.. Alma.... 
Con. C. Co.. Mentor... 
Con.C.Co.,Abbey No.4 

Oakland Coal Co 

Crown C.& T.Co.,No.2 

Crown C.&T.C0..N0.4 

Con. C. Co.. Reinecke 

No. 2 


Belleville 

Marissa.. 
CoUinsvii 

Belleville 


e'.:. 


90 
125 
205 
160 
125 
132 
120 
147 
210 
210 
140 
175 
185 
125 

110 
130 
liO 

90 
120 
115 
187 
160 

75 

166 

75 


8 

6 

I 
I' 

6 

6 

6.6 

7 

6.6 

6.6 

7 

7 

6 

6.6 

6.6 

6 

6,6 

7 

6 

6.6 

7 

6 

6.6 

6 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh. 

.. 

SI. 
Sh. 


S_. 


M 

I 

B. 

M. 
B. 

M. 


8.481 
41,372 
38,541 
47.368 
14,061 
26,145 
32,243 
30,850 
11.293 
11.138 
19. 104 
51.. 367 
10.500 
38.500 

60.844 
33.742 
33,018 
2(5,500 
74.058 
18,800 
34.555 
36,892 
56. 400 
31,518 
22,850 
26,000 


7.204 
31, 172 
32.37« 
37.813 
12.557 
22. 164 
25.618 
25. 166 
9.551 
9,360 
14, 142 
39,867 
IP, 500 
38, 500 

53,239 
32.842 
27. 312 
24.000 
60.841 
12.800 
27. 746 
21. 169 
43. 400 
25.518 


1,277 
9,200 
6,163 
9,555 
1.504 
3.981 
6.625 
5.684 
1.742 
1.778 
4.962 
11.500 

7.605 


16 
1< 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
?4 


Highland Coal Co.... 
Massie Coal Co. No. 1 
Massie Coal Co. No. 2 

Glendale Coal Co 

West End Coal Co.... 

Oak Hill Coal Co 

Skellett Coal Co 

Hippard Coal Co 


90O 
5.706 
2,500 
13.217 
6.000 
6.809 
15.723 
13.000 
6.000 


25 
26 


Humboldt Coal Co.... 
.Johnson Coal & M.Co. 


22.850 

26.OOOI 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



218 



Marion County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 








ACCI- 
den's 










a 


a 

3 


t- 




Price paid 


?3 


1 


P 








X s 




m 


^^ 


•§ 


./ 


per gross ton. 






u 




Capacity 
































"c — 


1 Aggregate 




c . 


-t 


>. 







~T 


''~ 


^ 




mine- 




J_, 


value 


s 


S-a 


^' 


-^ 


c 


s 


~ 


H 







tons. 






of total 


83 


— . 


£• 


OS . 


^ 


- >, 






•^ 




a 


0I 


! product. 


^1 


11 


H 







£•5 


a| 








3 





3 

z 


<- 




^^ 


S' 


^M 


^ 


Cx< = 


:g = 


z.^ 


Q 


W 'A\ z 




1 


$0 75 


S116.163 


150 


2o| 


39 


209 


* 




M. 


225 


5,857 1 8 


200,000 


" 


7d 


105.998 


140 


.sol 


.37 


207 


* 




" 


213 


6,390 


..! 11 


200.000 


8 


80 


! 118.229 


110 


40 


22 


172 


+ 




S-!VI . 


313 


4,187 


2 14 


200.000 


4 


75 


78.646 


100 


as; 


18 


153 


* 






150 


4.647 


1 


1 


200,000 


5 


90 


• 17,210 


;^o 


10 


15 


60 


$0 41 




' ' 


2U0 


960 




1 


90,000 


6 


1 CO 


1 10,250 


15 


4 


« 


27 


I 




" 


200 


150 
22, 191 




.... 


20,000 








550 


139' 


IT) 


828 








S5 


910,000 




SO 77. 2 














217 










, 




1 






! 




1 I 



ers 
ton 



* More than four-Bfths of the work was done by day work; shooters. .S2.50 per day. load 
15 cents per box. 
t Odin Coal Co. pays machine men $2.00 per day, shooters the same, loaders 10 cents per 

I 50 cents for screened coal and 35 cents for gross-weight coal. 

St. Clair Connty, iS5S— Continued. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 




3 

.2 1 




ACCI- 
d'nts 










p 


3 

3 


01 

> 




Price paid 


as 


ft 


CO 










Aggregate 
value 
of total 


1 


ll 


2.^ 


1 

a 

a 

5 


per gross ton. 


So 


> 

1: 


1 
a 




Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 




a 
"5 si 


.2 




'i 


-3 

a 


"5 S 


product. 


Oft 


ii 


If 

= 5 


"a 

Si 


1-3 


a^ 


o 




'i 


1 




z 


< 




Z 


o 


< 


H 


^ 


fe 


0. 


Q 


W 


'^ 


z 




1 


SO 70 


$5,298 


20 




2 


25 




so 33 


S-M. 


,2 


136 






60.000 


2 


75 


26, 429 


41 




7 


.55 




33 




165 


209 






100, COO 


3 


75 


25.824 


40 




9 


56 




33 




153 


238 






90.000 


4 


75 


30.748 


48 




8 


62 




33 




163' 


323 






120.000 


5 


75 


9.793 


IS 




2 


23 


so 40 






104' 


300 






60.000 


6 


75 


17.618 


26 




4 


33 




33 




162! 


127 






60.000 


7 


75 


20.869 


18 




4 


27 


40 






188, 


744 






60. COO 


8 


75 


20.011 


18 


6 


7 


31 




* 33 




122 


920 






100.000 


9 


70 


7.030 


26 


6 


4 


36 


40 






63 


229 






100. 000 


10 


70 


6.907 


21 


4 


5 


30 


40 






70 


226 






120,000 


11 


75 


11.847 


34 


9 


5 


4>i 


40 






62 


319 






100.000 


12 


65 


30.513 


20 


3 


5 


28 




33 




236: 


240 






50,000 


13 


65 


6.825 


45 3 


3 


51 


40 






601 


3(M1 






50,000 




65 
65 


25.025 
36.126 




: 


8? 


40 
40 






140, 

185' 


700 
1.483 






75,000 


15 


« 


10 




90.000 


16 


77.5 


25. .551 


.S7 


3 


3 


4:i 


40 






200 


706 




2 


50,000 


17 


70 


21,001 


36 


•A 


4 


43 


40 






170 


815 






65.000 


18 


6S 


17.32C 


25 


2 




2S 


40 






200 


ISO 






40.000 


19 


66 


42.137 


65 


16 


10 


91 




33 






(i25 






150.000 


20 


85 


12.980 


15 


2 


2 


IS 


40 






250 


324 




25.000 




75 


23.022 


27 


2 


3 


32 


40 






186, 


so:{ 




60.000 


22 


65 


19.262 


40 


3 


4 


47 


40 






1921 


854 




75,000 


23 


60 


31.240 


6(1 


6 


12 


7h 


40 






211' 


1 , S(i6 




85.000 


24 


75 


20.63fi 


60 


7 


•1 


76 


40 






171 


,581 




100.000 


25 


67.5 


15.423 


20' 2 


2 


24 


40 






273, 


570 




35.000 


26 


60 


15.600 


20 


3 


2 


25 


40 






200 : 


800 






40.000 



Drilling machines, not cutting machines, used here. 



214 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



St. Clair County, 1898 — Continued. 









Description. 


Output. 




1 

T 


1 

".a 


g 
3 






13 








0) 


Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


'i 

o 
o 


11 


li 

'si Oi 


o 
a 


i 

o 


u 

o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 
















ii 










s 






ft 


.2 m 




"S 


p 














0) 


3<M 




J5 












'A 






Q 


H 


O 


CB 


XI 


s 








27 


Mo. &I1I. Coal Co 


Belleville 


90 


6 


. 


Sh. 


S. 


B. 


35,341 


24, 739 


10.602 


28 


Mo. & 111. Coal Co 




12(] 


6 


6 


" 






34,081 


25.360 


8.521 


29 


Mo. & 111. Coal Co 




131) 


6 


6 








39, 761 


29,821 


9,940 


■M 


Leb. Coal & M. Assn.. 


Lebanon 


2(K1 


6 


7 








37.449 


30,524 


6,925 


:n 


J. Moser(TurkeyHill) 


Rentchler 


11(J 


7 


6 








13,700 


12,820 


880 


92 


Wm. Ogden & Bro....! " 


12(J 


7 


6 






" 1 12,500 


9,500 


3,000 


H'ii 


Freeburg Minin? Co.. 


Freeburg 


130 


7 


6 








32.000 


30,000 


2,000 


34 


Dutch Hollow C. Co.. 




150 


8 


6 








29,045 


23,689 


5,356 


H^ 


J. Krantz 


Belleville 


55 


6 


6 








9.754 


9, 754 




36 


Ebel Bros 




50 


6 


6 








6.000 


6.000 




.S7 


Johnson Coal Co 


Marissa 


120 


6 


6 








37,682 


30. 146 


7,536 


;« 


Advance Coal Co 




87 


6 


6 


" 






18,285 


16,000 


2,285 


39 


Eureka Coal Co 




114 


6 


6 








2,200 


2,200 




40 


O'FallonC. & M. Co.. 


O'Pallon 


200 


6 


7 








64,325 


38.600 


25,725 


4) 


Joseph Taylor 




20(1 


6 


7 








60,965 


58.224 


7.741 


42 


Ratic'n, J'yce&GrievelCasey ville . . . . 


200 


■6 


7 








40,000 


25,000 


15,000 


43 


Walnut Hill Coal Co. 


Birkner 


200 


6 


6 








28,695 


22, 956 


5,739 


44 


Tirre & Sons Coal Co. 


Lenzbure 


191 


6.6 


6 


■ ' 


" 




40,236 


30.636 


9,600 


45 


Summit Coal Co 


Birkner 


190 


7 


6 






29,387 


23,887 


5,^00 


4H 


Kolb Coal Co 


Mascoutah ... 


160 


7 


6 


•' " 




74,500 


55. 200 


19,800 


47 






175 


8 


6 


" 1 " 




3,704 


3.204 


500 


48 


Millstadt Coal Co 


Millstadt 


48 


6 


6 


" 1 " 




16,859 


14,662 


2,197 


49 


William Pistor ! " 


46 


6 


6 


" !Ho. 




2,630 


2.630 




m 


Dutch Hill Coal Co...|New Athens.. 


71) 


6.6 


6 


" S 




10,000 


8.000 


2,000 


51 


Muren Coal & lee Co..! Belleville 


18(J 


6 


6 








53, 200 


35,467 


17.733 


5;^ 






55 


7 


6 


' ' 


Ho 




4,380 


4,380 




.53 


Nicholas Weiss 




fifi 


6.6 


6 








2,000 


2.000 




54 


Klingenfus Bros 




70 


6 


6 




S. 




1,350 


1.350 




55 


Sliment & Son 


Centreville.... 


60 


6 


6 


1). 


M. 




1.000 


1.000 




5H 


James Charleton 


French Vill'ge 


,50 


6 


6 


SI, 


S. 




1.250 


1,250 




57 


Conrad Strawbinaer.. 




50 


6 


6 


1). 


iVI. 




4.000 


4.000 




5S 


Conrad Reeb 


Belleville 


100 
20 


7 
6 


6 
6 


Hi: 






4,333 
1,500 


4,333 
1.500 




59 


Louis Grossman 




60 


Frederick Murphy.... 




60 


6 


6 


Sh. 


' ' 




4,000 


4.000 




61 


Benjamin Johnson... 




30 


6 6 


6 








3,000 


3.OO0 




62 


Diedrich Coal Co 


Freeburg 


60 


7.6 


6 


' ' 


' ' 




1,500 


1.50C 




63 




Belleville 


35 


6 


6 








4,000 


4.000 














Totals 


1.600.752 


1,291,241 


309 511 




Averages 






















i 













Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 63. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 63. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



215 



St. Clair County, 1898 — Concluded. 



Values. 



S.2 



Aggrregate 

value 

of total 

product. 



I t 



Wages. 



Price paid per 


gross ton. 




0) 


fi 




cs ti 


■Sbi 


.a a 








a 


£ a 






Si 


ga 


fe 


t, 



-a© 
&4 



a 




Acci- 


=>, 




den's 




i 




1 














0) 


-s 






•-S 














n 
















S 


^ 


"f? 


a 










Q 


W 


5^ 


Z 



Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 



75 
75 
70 
70 
1 00 
70 
80 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 



1 12.5 

75 
1 00 

75 

65 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 GO 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



$20,320 
20, 022 
23.359 
30.933 
7.912 
7.875 
23. 100 
17.921 
7.315 
6.000 
23.362 
13.942 
1, 

35,381! 

43.014 

22.5001 

18,938! 

23.7531 

17,1761 

41,670 

3,729 

12,094 

2.630 

6, 700 

30, 1461 

4,:JS0 

2,000 

1,350 

1,000 

1,250! 

4,000: 

4,333 

1,500 

4,000 

3,000 

1,500 

4.000 



i 




c 












i 


1 


1 









1 




1 




1 




1 





$0 40 

40 



. $1,018,792 1,705 



$0 71.3 1 $0 



S-M. 



W. 

S-M. 



128 
1261 
130 
125' 
257! 
150{ 
240 
200 
210 
300 
200 
200 
80 
195 i 
192! 
160 i 
160! 
230 1 
2471 
2401 
200 



300 i 



1.176 
750 

977 
325 
475 
300 
710 



26 

250 

1,076 

482 

90! . . 

1,214!.. 

1,577 .. 

1,500 .. 

750! . . 
1,050!..: 

647 

220 

112 

400 



" ! 315 

" 300 

W. I 250 

S-M.! 100 

'• I 150 

" 250 

•• 303 

W. 1 3001 



300 
l.SOO 

120 
26 

125 
5 
42 

100 
48 
50 

100 
751 
40 

100 



* Drilling machines only used in this 
t Abandoned April. 1898. 



216 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products, 


Values. 


County. 


i 

a 

g 

'o 

a 


a 
S 
u 
a 
a 

X 


6 
-a 

1 
"3 

o 

a 
a 


1 

g 


1 
s 

a 

O 

§ 

<1 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Estimated capacity 
(in tons) of existing 
mines. 


si 
11 

Si's 
< 


o 

03 

il 




2 
4 

23 
6 

63 
~98 


2 
4 

11 
6 
49 
72 


12 

14 
26 


1 
1 


3 

1 
4 


96,314 73 801 


22,510 
70, 761 
150,887 
192.864 
309,511 


87,488 
380,043 
519, 722 
676,840 
1,357,428 




Clinton 

Madison 

Marion 

St. Clair 


417.584 

630, 769 

714, 513 

1.600.752 


346.823 

479.882 

521.649 

1.291.241 


645,000 
1,827.400 

910,000 
3, 633, 500 


79 

77.9 
77.2 
71.3 


298, 723 

427.518 

446,526 

1.018.792 


Totals 

Averages . 


3,459.932 


2,713.399 


746.533 


3,021,521 


7, 180, 900 


$0 74.6 


$2,248,733 



























Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 101. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 1. 
Number of mines exhau.sted or abandoned during the year, 4. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 98. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



217 



Sixth Disiricf—lS98. 



E. 


IPLOYES. 


Average number of days of 
active operation. 


Number of kegs of powder 
used. 


Casi-alties. 


Wages. 


Machine.s. 


S 


a 
i- 
1 

o 
o 

II 


Total employes. 


1 

s 


3 


1 


a 


Average price 
paid per gross ton. 


Number of mines 
using macliiues. 

Number of macbines 
in use. 


i 


a 

o 

1 

a 

3 


For I For 

hand machine 

mining, mining. 


k 


114 


58 


172 


» 


M5.I ■!.... 


1 


2 


SO 43 SO 33 r 7 


82.841 


325 


142 


467 


188 


7.438 




13 






40 38 j 2 17 


122,754 


751 


275 


1,026 


145 


8,082 




9 






41.3; 33 1 6 58 


421.524 


550 


278 
464 


828 


217 


22, 191 


4 


35 


4 


7 


* 1 1 . 


107,500 
324.781 


1,705 


2,169 


192 


32,596 


3 


18 


2 


11 


40 33 8 


36 


3.415 


1,217 


4,662 




71,757 


8 


75 


7 


20 


18 


123 


1,059,400 








182 












$0 40.4 SO 33.6 












i 






......... 





Wages paid by the day. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS 219 



SEVENTH INSPECTION DISTRICT— 1898. 

Counties: Gallatin, Hamilton, Jackson, Jefferson, Johnson, Perry, Ran- 
dolph, Saline, Washington, Williamson. 

Evan D. John, Inspector^ Carbondale. 



Hon. David Ross. Secretar>/, 

State Bureau, of Labor Statistics, Spriufjfield, Illinois. 

Sir: — In compliance with section 12 of the general mining law of the State 
of Illinois, I have the honor to submit to you the annual report of the Seventh 
Inspection District for the year ending June 30, 1898, the same being the third 
annual report of the Seventh district as now defined, and the fifteenth of the 
general sei'ies. 

The district shows an increase in output over that of 1897 of 821,798 tons. 
The largest increase is in Williamson county, and is 245,028 tons. Jackson 
county comes next with an increase of 23.5,982 tons. Pei'ry county shows an 
increase of 155,408 tons. Randolph county has an increase of 123,425 tons. 
Saline county has an increase of 48,316 tons. Washington county has an in- 
crease of 18.093 tons, and Hamilton county has an increase of 4,122 tons. 
Gallatin. Jefferson and Johnson counties show a total decrease of 9,180 tons. 

The following is a summary of the statistics of the year for the Seventh dis- 
trict: 

Number of counties in which coal is produced 10 

Total number of mines 123 

Shipping mines 59 

Local mines 61 

New mines 7 

Abandoned mines 8 

Mines using machines 10 

Total tonnage 3, 159, 300 

Tons of lump coal 2,211,403 

Tons of other grades 947,897 

Aggregate value of total product S2, 262, 426 

Average value of lump coal per ton at the mine SO. 868 

Number of miners 2,957 

Number of other employes 1, 30S 

Total number of employes 4,265 

Average number of days of operation for all mines 134 

Number of kegs of powder used 69, 671 

Number of fatal accidents 17 

Numljer of non-fatal accidents 48 

Number of widows 9 

Numlter of orphans 23 

Number of coal cutting machines used 53 

Total lons of coiil cut r)y machines 582,477 

Number of tons of .-oal produced to each fatal accident 185.841 

Number of tons of coal imxluced to e;ich non-fatal accident 65,819 

Number of persons employed to each fatal accident 251 

Number of persons employed to each non-fatal accident 89 



220 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Prosmctive Mines. — A company o£ miners is sinking a shaft one mile east of 
Lander Station, in Williamson county, on the Illinois Central Railroad. 

A shaft is being sunk by D. N. Priehett in Williamson county, one mile 
south of Stonefort, on the Big Four Railroad, Cairo division. 

New Mines. — Jackson county. — The Big Muddy Coal and Iron Company, at 
Murphysboro, has completed shaft No. 6 and has fitted it up in first-class 
shape, top and bottom. 

Oliver Bailey has opened a new local mine thi^ee miles southeast of Carbon- 
dale. 

Johnson county. — The New Burnside Coal Company has opened a slope one 
mile north of New Burnside on the Big-Four Railroad, close to the old Bald 
Knob mine, which was abandoned several yeai's ago. 

Williamson county. — The Ohio and Mississippi Valley Coal and Mining 
Company has completed its shaft No. 2, two miles north of Marion on the 
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad, and has three electric chain machines at 
work. 

William Jack has sunk a local shaft two and one-half miles north of Marion. 

The local shaft at Blairsville has been reopened by W. H. Williams. 

Abandoned Mines. — One local mine in Hamilton county: two local mines in 
Jackson county; one local mine in Saline county, and two local mines in 
Williamson county have been abandoned. 

Escapement Shafts. — The Big Muddy Coal and Iron Company, No. 7,- at 
Herrins, Williamson county, has completed its escapement and air shaft. 

The Williamson county Coal Company has completed its escapement shaft. 

The Crab Orchard Coal Company has completed its escapement shaft. 

The Mt. A^ernon Coal Company has also completed an escapement shaft 
which is 850 feet deep. 

Fatal Accidents.— 3 wly 16, 1897, William Mercer, a driver at the Jupiter 
Mining Company's shaft, at DuQuoin, was found m an unconscious condition 
in the main entry at 8 a. m., and was conveyed to the surface where he died 
at 8:15 a. m. It is the custom in this mine for the room drivers to pull their 
coal out to a place about 800 feet from the bottom on the main entry, and 
from there out the entry driver pulls the coal to the bottom. William Mercer 
had charge of all the drivei's and was a driver himself. Before leaving the 
bottom on the morning of his death, with his mule, he sent a boy to ascertain 
how many cars were lying at this particular point on the main entry. The 
boy reported 19 loaded pit cars. Mercer then went inside and commenced 
pulling out the coal, and had brought his trip out to the main entry where the 
19 loaded cars were standing. When found he was lying between the rail of the 
track and the rib of the coal in front of his trip, which was within four feet of 
the standing ears. His mule was still coupled to his trip. The deceased was 32 
years old and leaves a widow and two children. No marks were found on 
the body. However, at the coroner's inquest, the physician stated that on 
examination a clot of blood was found on the inside in the region of the 
bowels. The case is now pending in the courts on a suit for damages; two 
trials have been had in the circuit court of Perry county, the jury failing to 
agree at each trial. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 221 

July 17, 1897, William Killiam, a miner in the employ of the Illinois Central 
Coal and Salt Company at St. Johns, was injured at *J a. m., from the effects 
of which he died at 11 a. m. This was to be his last day's work at the mine, 
as he had laid off the day before to secure employment at another mine. He 
had a standing shot in his room and was minintr it off when a piece of slate 
9 feet loutr, ^ feet wide and 8 inches thick fell on him. He knew the place 
was dani>:erous, but he wanted to have his place cleaned up and then put up 
some tirabe.'s. Deceased was 38 years old and leaves a widow and one child. 

July 31, 1897, Julius Smith, a miner at the Willis Coal and Mining Com- 
pany's mine at WiUisville, was instantly killed by falling slate about 10 a. m., 
while at work at the face of his room. Deceased was 49 j'ears old and leaves 
a widow and one child. 

August 11, 1897, John Yates, aged 32, single, an engineer in the employ- 
ment of the Big Muddy Coal and Coke Company at DeSoto, was injured by a 
boiler explosion at the air shaft at 6:30 a. m., from which injuries he died at 
11:45 a. m. The night watchman had been on duty as usual, and had left 
about 5:30 a. m. He claims to have left everything in good order. John 
Yates had only been at work about 10 minutes when the explosion occurred 
which caused his death. 

September 16, 1897, Fred Grenhold, a miner employed at the Williamson 
county Coal Company's mine, at Johnston City, was instantly killed by falling 
coal. He was mining off a standing shot, and being old he was unable to get 
out of the way of the falling coal. Deceased was 54 years of age and single. 

September 24, 1897, at the mine of the Williamson County Coal Co., at 
Johnston City, a fire damp explosion occurred at 7 a. m., which proved fatal to 
Frank Fauaro, aged 45, and single; John Geneli, aged 38, single; Charles 
Schiller, aged 34, single, and Peter Casper, aged 37, single, also seriously in- 
juring Robert Britton and Joseph Barlow. Barlow has not been able to work 
since the accident. 

On the morning of September 24 the men gathered at the pit top, as usual, 
for work; the fire boss being sick, the mine had not been examined on this 
morning. Caleb Davis, the mine manager, claims to have told Peter Casper 
and others who were working in the first and second south entries on the cast 
side, to remain at the bottom of the shaft till he could come down and ex- 
amine their working places. Peter Casper, on reaching the bottom, went di- 
rect into the first south entry and left his naked light on the outside of the 
cross-cut and took off his coat and went to the face and started to brush out 
the fire damp with his coat. After working at this a few minutes he returned 
and got his naked light and then went and got an empty pit-car and pushed 
it toward the face. As soon as he was inside the cross cuts a few feet his 
naked light came in contact with the fii'e damp, which caused a terriffc ex- 
plosion and the death of the four miners mentioned. The stoppings, doors 
and timber of the first and second south entries were blown in all directions. 
Robert Britton and Joseph Barlow were blown several feet along the main 
east entry by the force of the explosion. Joseph Barlow had his leg broken 
and the flesh torn, and his head badly bruised. Robert Britton had his left 
arm broken. Caleb Davis, mine manager, was at the pit top at the time the 



222 STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

explosion occurred, and as soon as possible he secured some practical men 
and started them to work to restore ventilation by putting up temporary doors 
and stoppings. Peter Casper walked alone to the bottom of the shaft, though 
severely burnt, and was there met by his friends and conveyed to his boarding 
house, where he died on the 26th. Chas. Schiller was found in the second south 
entry by the searching party, trying to make his way to the bottom. At the 
time of the explosion he was at the mouth, which was 200 feet from the face 
of the entry, on his knees, taking off his top shirt. He managed to crawl 
several hundred feet along the entry. He was conveyed to his boarding house, 
where he died on the 25th. Frank Fanaro was found dead in his room in the 
first south entry, evidently overcome by after damp, and when found was 
lying face downward. It was then supposed that this was all that were in- 
jured by the explosion, and the searchers went to the top, but after a few 
minutes it became known that John Geneli was missing. The party then de- 
scended the shaft and searched for him. They found him dead in the third 
room from where he was working, toward the bottom. It was evident that 
he had tried to find his way out after the explosion, but had become bewildered 
and sti'ayed into this room. Peter Casper said there was some one calling for 
help and light when he was on his way out. The last body was taken out at 11 
a, m. The company was sinking an escapement at the time of the explosion, 
which has been completed since. I visited the mine on the afternoon of Sep- 
tember 24, and discovered, upon examination of the record book, that the 
mine had not been examined in the morning before the men were allowed to 
go to woi-k, nor had it been examined since the morning of September 20, the 
day on which I made my previous visit. This mine, at the date of this report, 
is operated by A. W. Crawford, lessee. 

November 22, 1897, William Edwards, a miner employed in the mine of the 
Equality Coal Company, at Equality, received injuries from a premature blast 
about 8:30 a. m., from which he died November 28. His shot had missed fire 
the evening before and, there being no work at the mine on the 22d, he asked 
some of the miners to accompany him, so that he might show them how to 
drill out a miss-fired shot. He took a churn drill and churned out the tamp- 
ing, and when he came to the powder it exploded and burned him so severely 
that he died from its effects. Deceased was 50 years old, and leaves a widow 
and thi*ee children. 

December 8, 1897, Alexander Hooks, aged 38, married, leaves a widow and 
three children, by occupation a miner, was killed about 1:30 p. m., in the 
mine of the Jupiter Mining Company, of DuQuoin, He had tried to take 
down a piece of draw slate at the face, and on failing to take down the slate, 
he undertook to work off some coal which was directly under the slate which 
he had just tried to take down. After working at the coal for some time the 
slate fell on him and killed him instantly. 

December 15, 1897, John Coyne, aged 44, single, by occupation a miner, was 
suffocated by gases from a coal fire in the third south entry on the east side 
of mine No. 2, of the Scott-Wilson Coal Company, at Fredonia. At 7:30 
a. m., miners working on the'east side reported to the mine manager that 
there was smoke coming from some of the pillars between the second and 



COAL IN ILLIXOIS. 223 

third south entries. He immediately ordered all of the men out of the mine, 
except a few whom he kept to locate the fire. One of the mules got away 
from the driver and ran into the third south entry, and was allowed to g-o, as 
it was thought too dangerous to go after him on account of the smoke. About 
9:30 a. m., John Coyne started in the direction the mule had taken and asked 
some of the men to follow him; none, however, went. The mine manager, 
on finding out what Coyne had done, sent two men in search of him, but they 
could not find him and returned. Another party was organized in the after- 
noon to go in search of Coyne, and they found him dead, about 6 p. m., in 
the third south entry, 1,200 feet from the main east entry, the mule being a 
little beyond the body of Coyne. When the men reached the switch with 
Coyne's body the mule was close to their heels and seemed to be unharmed. 
The fire originated among some old timbers where some one must have 
changed lamp cotton, which set fire to the coal. This part of the mine was 
then sealed up for three weeks and was then reopened, when it was found the 
fire had all died out. 

December 31, 1897, Greelj- Jones, aged 25, single, by occupation a timbei-- 
man, was killed by a fall of slate about 2 p. m.,in the Willis Coal and Mining 
Company's mine, at Willisville. He had set up a prop under some loose 
slate, and, after setting it, it did not suit him and he took a sledge and 
started to straighten the prop by hitting it at the bottom. In doing this the 
prop swung and let down the loose slate, which killed him instantlj'. 

March 11, 1898, John Stanhouse, aged 40, married, leaves a widow and two 
children, by occupation a miner, was killed at 9:30 p. m., in the mine of the 
Jupiter Mining Company, at DuQuoin. John Stanhouse was working in an 
■entry pillar. He had a good deal of loose coal, and made the remark to his 
partner that as soon as they should get some of their coal loaded out they 
would put up some props to secure the roof. Before the coal was loaded out 
the slate gave way and John Stanhouse 's head was cauglit between the 
bumper of the car and the slate and he was killed instantly. They were work- 
ing on the night shift. 

Maroh 11, 1898, John Allison, aged 48, married, leaves a widow and one 
child, by occupation a miner, was found in an unconscious condition in the 
return air- way of Hugh Murray's mine at Sparta, at 6:30 p. m. He died 
while being carried out of the air- way. He was last seen about 9 a. m., by 
John Wiuterbottom, mine manager, who told him to go and get his tools from 
where he had been working and bring them to the bottom, and that he would 
give him another place to work. It was a great deal shorter distance for 
Allison to bring his tools to the bottom by the return air- way than to go 
around by the regular road. The sanitary condition of the air-way where 
Allison was found was good. The judgment of the coroner's jury was that 
his death was caused by heart disease. 

May 5. 1898, Thomas Holman, aged 30, married, leaves a widow and two 
children, by occupation a miner, was injured by the explosion of a keg of 
powder about 2:30 p. m., in Brown tV: Harwell's mine, at Cutler, from which 



224 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



injuries he died May 17. He had got a full keg of powder that morning and 
did not take time to unscrew the top of the keg, but drove his steel pick into 
the keg, which caused the powder to explode and his death. 

June 15, 1898, John Jeffery, aged 54, married, leaves a widow and eight 
children, by occupation a miner, was killed by a fall of top coal at 1:45 p. m., 
at the GartsideCoal Company's mine No. 4, at Murphysboro. Jeffery and his 
brother were at work at a pillar. They had shot the bottom coal out for sev- 
eral feet and had fired a shot at noon that day which had loosened the top 
coal, and were working out the bottom coal at the time the accident occurred. 
Jeffery lived but a few minutes after getting out from under the fall of the 
top coal. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Evan D, John. 

State Inspector of Mines, Seventh District. 
Carbondale. 



Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — 1898. 



Occupation. 



Residence. 



S^ 



Cause of Accident. 



1897 
July 



Aug. 
Sept. 



Nov. 
Dec. 



William Mercer ... 

William Killiam... 

Julius Smith 

■John Yates 

Fred Grendhold ... 

Prauk Fanaro 

John Geneli 

24!Charles Schiller... 

24iPeter Casper 

2:ii William Edwards. 

SiAIex Hooks 

15 .John Coyne 

31 Greely Jones 



Mar. 11 

" 11 

May 5 

June 15 



John Stanhonse.. 

.John Allison 

Thomas Holman. 
•John Jeffery 



Totals. 



Driver . 
Miner. . 



Engineer. 
Miner 



Timberman. 



DuQuoin 

St. Johns ... 
Willisville.. 

De So'o 

Johns'n City 



Equality... 
DuQuoin... 
Predonia... 
Willisville. 



Miner DuQuoin 

Sparta 

Cutler 

Murp'ysb'ro 



Unknown* 

Falling roof 

Falling roof 

Boiler explosion 

Falling coal 

Fire damp explosion. 
Fire damp explosion. 
Fire damp explosion. 
Fire damp explosion. 

Premature blast 

Palling roof 

Suffocation 

Falling roof 



3 Falling roof 

2 Supposed heart dis.. 

3 Explo. keg of powder 
OiFailingcoal 



Total fatal casualties, 17. 

* Case now in the courts and undecided. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 225 

Recapitulation of Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — 1S98. 



Residence. 


No. 


Occupation. 


No. 


Nature of Casualty No. Colliery. 


No. 


Cutler. 


2 


Driver 

Engineer 

Miners 


1 
1 
14 

1 


Explosion of boiler 1 iBigMudily ('. & C.Co.l 1 
Explos'n.fire d'nip' 4 iBrowii cV.- t'.arwell ....1 1 
Explos'n keg pow 1 Fimiiitv ( 'o.ii r^n i i 


De Soto 

DuQuoin 


Equjility 

Iredonia 

Lake Creek... 
Murphysboro. 

St. John 

Sparta 

Willisville.... 


Timberman... 


Expio'n.shot.preml 1 

Palling coal ; 2 

Palling slate 5 

Heart ilisease* i 1 

Snlif., gas, burn. coal 1 
Unknown! i 1 


(■Jartsidf C. Co. No. 4 
111. (•-•iir. ('. ctSaltCo 
• lur»it('i- .Mining Co... 

Murray, linudi 

.Sf,,tt- Wilson Coal Co. 

No. 2 

Williamson Co.C.CIo. 
Willis Coal & M. Co.. 


I 

1 

1 
5 
2 


Totals 


17 


17 








1 







* Judgment of coroner's jury. 

t Cause of death undecided, case pending in court. 

Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — 1898. 



Date. 


Name. 


< 


Residence. 


-6 


n 
t 
2 
5 




i 

a 

a 


Character of Injury. 




1897 
July 6 


M.Werchmsky... 
Batistic Sarto.... 

S.J. Raiiuey 

EdLedford 

Chas. Meadows... 

John Corder 

Antonio Berea.... 

Uug Wingatz 

.lohn Hamilton... 
Charles Smith — 
VVilliam Roberts.. 
Dell Preem.an.... 

John Gaddis 

!ohn Brown 

Robert Brilton... 
Joseph Barlow... 
Jame.s Mannard.. 
Charles Morley... 
N.Mansker 


30 

1 

i 

47 
26 


Halli<l'yb-ro 
St. John 


1 


3 


1 
1 

.... 
1 

"i 
1 

"i 

.... 

1 
1 

.... 

.... 
.... 


4 


Leg l)roken. 


45 


•• 15 


— 

:::: 
2 

4 
2 
5 

1 
3 

"4 

.... 

1 
4 
5 
■> 


Leg broken 


90 


" 22 


Ledford 










" 2S 












::f,? 


Carterville.. 
M'rnhvsb'ro 


1 

1 
1 

1 

1 


1 
3 

1 
4 

"2 


Body injured 

Poot bruised 


45 


Aug. 10 


Back injured 




•• iO 


35,Carterville.. 
22iM'rnhvsb'ro 




- 


" 16 


.\rni broken 


45 


" 16 
•• 17 
" 24 


'3 
2^ 
40 
21 
16 
16 
23 
70 
30 
41 


DuQuoin — 
M'rphysb'ro 

Carterville.. 
M'rphysb'ro 
Lake Creek. 

M'rphysb'ro 
Carterville.. 


Hips and legs injured 

Head and shoulder injured ... 
Head injured 


60 
16 



" 25 


1 

.... 

1 

I 

1 

"i 
1 


3 

■■3 
4 

1 

"i 






Sept.28 




r' 


*• 24 


'\rin broken 


45 


" 24 

•• 27 

Oct. 19 

" 29 


Leg broken and head bruised. 

Body injured 

Head and back injured 


10 

24 

40 


Nov. 21 


Henry Beltz 

Wm. Levesmeyer 

Prank Valle 

George Carson... 

lohn Lewis 

William Jones 

Milton Candiff... 
Frank McNeill... 

Henry Walker.... 
.lauies Hai-ris 

Marsh St(inp_ 


Ankle fractured .. 


45 


" 2C 


2S M'rphysb'ro 
1S» 


Hea 1 injured. 


12 


" 27 


.... 
1 

2 
5 




10 


" 30 


Body injured. 


IS 


Dec. 7 

" 17 


Arm injured 


17 


'• 27 


19 










'10 


" 28 


M'rnhvsh'ro 






Hands and arm injured 

Body injured 




1898 
Jan. 7 


28DuBois 

35 


1 
1 


1 
4 


14 


•• 7 




'^I 


" 10 


21 
40 


Carterville.. 




14 


" U);(i.-orgo Heddic... 


DiiOiioin 


1 


4 


Body injured 


45 


Feb. uLlanios Klackwell. 


21 Hallid'yb'ro 
23 M'rphysb'ro 


■■■3 
.... 

"i 

1 
5 
5 

1 

7 






•• M' Harvey Wagner.. 


1 
"i 


2 




f) 


Mar. s: lames ("arler 


Arm injured 


19 


April 2 rayl.>r.\kin.s 

•• 12 David Bailey 


2S 
18 
30 


Sunfield .... 


Hea^l and breast injured 


•^? 


•' 20, Walter Ballard... 


M'rnhvsh'ro 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


■4 
4 


Body injured 


10 


" 30 I'aul Zeto 


401 

40 DuQuoin.... 

53 St. .lohn.... 

23 M'rphysb'ro 

35 DuQuoin.... 

48M"rphysb'ro 




9 


May 6 Andv .-Vnderson.. 


Back injured . 


30 


7 .Tasi)er Knight 


Ankle broken 


49 


" 10 Lewis Branco ... 




5 


•• 12iM. Boninniisky... 
" 25|John Branco 


Shoulder injured 

Head and body injured 


28 
21 



-15 



226 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Non-Fatal Casualties, iS^S— Concluded. 



Date. 


Name. 


1 


Residence. 


'6 


1 

1 


•S 

03 


1 
P. 


Character of Injury. 


i 

. 

ll 


1898 
June 1 


.leff West 


25 
39 
50 
26 
45 








1 
.... 


"3 
3 

"5 




16 


Willinni Rntlpr 


Stonefort... 
DuQuoin ... 




2 




* 


" "'4 Miles McL^uUom 


Body injured 


15 


" 28 Wm. Ratelberge.. 
'• 30 Chas.L.P. tterson 




* 


Total... 


31 


4 

~59 


Head and breast injured 


* 
1031 











* Not recovered July 1, 1898. 



Total men injured 48 

Not recovered July 1,1898 6 

Number recovered 42 

Total time lost by men recovered 1,031 days 

Average time lost per man recovered 24.5 



Eecapitulation of Non-Fatal Casualties — Seventh District — 1898. 



Residence. 


No. 


Carterville . . . 


6 


Dubois 


2 


DuQuoin 


8 


Fredonia 


1 


Hallidayboro. 


2 


Lakecreek ... 


2 




2 


Murphysboro. 


21 


St. John 


2 


Stonefort 


1 


Sunfield 


1 


Totals 


48 



Occupation. 



Cagers 

Drivers 

Loaders ... 
Mach. helpers 
Mach. runners 

Miners 

Roadmen 

Trappers 



Cause of Accident. 



Cage 

Falling coal 

Falling prop 

Falling roof 

Fire damp 

Mules, kicked by. 

Pit cars 

Premature blasts 



Colliery. 



Big Muddy C.&LCo. 

Butler, William 

Carterville Coal Co 
Davenport Coal Co 
DuQuoin UnionC.Co. 
Enterprise Coal Co 
Gartside Coal Co .. 
Horns Colliery Co. 
111. Cent. C. & S. Co 

Kuhn, Adam 

Morris Bros. & Co 
MuddyV.M. & M. Co. 
St. L. BigM. C. Co .. 
Scott-Wilson CoalCo. 
Sun Coal & Coke Co . 
Williamson C. C. Co. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



227 



Tdhle showing the Nature of Injuries, Number of Persons Injured, 
Dependents, Titne Lost, with Averages and Percentages, Seventh 
District. 





S 



■z 


'6 


"31 
a 


•a 
Q 


Time Lost. 


Per cent 


Nature of Injury. 


Total 
days. 


Average 
days. 


of 
injuries. 


Ankle.s broken 


1 

3 
4 

1 

1 
2 
4 

10 
2 
5 
3 

1 


1 

2 
9 
1 

2 

6 

f 

1 


i 

i 

3 

4 

* 




5 
6 
2 
7 
22 
3 

7 

4 
17 

7 
4 
5 


1 
45' m 


2.08 




139 
47 
30 

152 


46.3 
12 
15 
16.9 


6 25 


Arms injured 

Backs injured 

Bodies injured 

Eve put out . . . 


8.33 
4.17 
18.75 
2 08 


Finders injured 


io 

54 
38 
141 


10 
27 
9.5 
14.1 


2 08 




4.17 


Hand.s injured. 


8.33 




20.83 


Hips and legs injured 


100 50 

225 45 
22 7.3 

28| 28 


4.17 




10.43 




6.25 


Shoulders injured 


2.08 






Totals, averages and percentages ... 


48 


31 


17 


90 


l,03lj 24.55 


100.00 



228 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Gallatin County — Seventh District— 1898. 





Name of Operator, 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

s 


1 

1 
o 
.a 
p. 
Q 


1 


li 

C5 


o 

& 
o 

1 


-a 
g 

o 
o 

ii 


i 
1 

o 
-a 
c 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


Equality Coal Co 

W. K. Stader 


Equality 

Leamington. . 
Shawneetown 
Saline Mines.. 


80 
30 
31 

20 
25 
25 
25 
30 
30 


4.10 
4.6 
4 

1.6 

4.6 
4.6 
4.10 
4.10 


5 
5 
5 
5 
6 
.6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh. 

Si 

D. 


S. 
Hd 

Ho. 
Hd 


B. 


11,372 
3,000 
425 
320 
55 
65 
675 
750 
150 


11,372 
3.000 
425 
320 
55 
65 
540 
600 
150 




3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
ft 


William M. Dain 

John Underwood 

Marion Brinkley 

Wilburn Thompson . . 
Strong & Talbot 


135 


q 


Andrew Reid. 






Totals . 






16,812 


16, 527 


285 




Averages . . . 











































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 9. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 9. 



Hamilton County — Seventh District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 






Desckiption. 






DUTPUT. 




1 

s 


Postoffice. 


1 

o 
.a 
p. 


I 

'o ^ 

55 


big 
5 = 


in 
C 

o 


i 

o 
o 

ii 


1 
o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 


J. C. Harper. 


Flint 


6 
12 


2 
2.6 




St. 


Ho. 


B. 


4,840 
42 


4,840 
42 




? 


R. I. Yates 


Dahlgreen 






Totals 






4,882 


4,882 

















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 3. 

Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1S9S, 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



Gallatin County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


d 
.2 

1 

1 
o 


'6 

0. 


Acci- 
d'nts 






5-2 

<4-C S 

©■5 

ll 


Aggrcfiratfc 

valr 

of tota 

product. 


do 


a 

1 


11 

^ til 
< 


1 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 


11 

5 s 

a ^ 

li 


fe 


1 


Capacity 


a 

S3 


of 


a 

n 


mine — 
tons. 


2 
3 


$0 90 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
I 00 
1 00 
80 
1 00 


$10,235 
3,000 
425 
320 
55 
65 
608 
510 
150 


24 
4 

2 

1 

1 

2 
2 


6 


4 
1 


34 
5 
2 
2 
1 
1 
3 
2 


$0 62.5 
62.5 
62.5 
62.5 
62.5 
62.5 
62.5 
62.5 
62.. 5 




W. 


160 
180 
90 
65 
20 
20 
160 
175 
40 


470 
50 
22 
18 
2 

■i 

12 

5 


1 
1 




40.000 
8,000 
1 500 


4 








.•> 






1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1 000 


6 






7 
H 


1 




9 






1.000 
















$0 92.4 


$15,368 


40 


7 


5 


52 






593 




55,700 




JO 62.5 






101 































Hamilton County, 1898 Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 




1 

o 

1 

o 

1 


-a 

3 

a 

o 
it 
M 


Acci- 
den's 






a.2 
.aa 

"1 

< 


Aggreg.ite 

value 

of total 

product. 


i 
2 

a . 
dp. 


II 
o 


1 

II 


o 

£ 


Price paid 
per gros.s ton. 


as 

1^ 








i 


§ 


Capac- 
ity of 
mine- 
tons. 


XI 

a 

3 

z 


a 

.a a 

si 




n 

an 

1^ 


1 


$125 
1 50 


$6,050 
63 


6 






6 
2 


$0 62.5 
62.5 





w. 


140 
10 


10 
1 


- 


:::: 


7,500 
1,000 


?, 














$1 25.2 


$6, 113 


8 






8 




11 




8,500 








$0 62.5 






75 





























230 



STATISTICS OF LABOK. 



Jackson County — Seventh District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 




j Description. 


Output. 


1 
s 

s 

7^ 


Postoffice. 


i 


ft 


1 



II 


1 

a 

a 

ii 

1^ 




s 



02 


-a 
n 

as 




Ii 


i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 


Gartside C. Co. No. 1. 

:: :: K:l: 

BisrM.C. &I.C0. N0.5 

No. 6 

" " Harris'n 

Daniel P.Willis 


Murphysboro. 

Carboudale... 
Sato '.'.'.'. 


121 
146 
148 
150 
150 
150 
130 
60 
35 
25 
22 
20 
25 
35 
12 
49 
10 
10 
60 
15 
166 


6.6 
6.6 
6.6 
6.6 
6.6 
6.3 

2.8 
7.5 
7.5 
7.6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
9 

8 


2 

i 

2 
2 

1 

7 


n 


Hd 
Ho. 

S. 

I- 

Ho. 

#a 

S. 


M. 


35,615 

69,043 

88,857 

242, 678 

14. 217 

116, 164 

12,550 

1,636 

150 

550 

1,500 

220 


35, 300 

49, 491 

60,904 

169, 005 

14,217 

87.952 

8,800 

1,136 

150 

400 

1.200 

lo! 100 

23, 047 

275 

425 

29,670 

554 

168, 197 


315 
19,552 
27,953 
73,673 

■■28.'£i2 
3,750 


q 


W. C. Beard 




in 




7 S_h. 




11 


•T C. Press n 


300 


12 

IS 


John A. Painter 

Oliver Bailev 


7 
2 

2 


m 


20 
50 


14 


Sato Coal &M. Co.... 

MasoH & Co 

Murph'boro B.M C.Co 
Argus & Barton 


" j 14,476 

" 1 10,100 

2^,596 

" ! 275 
42.=S 


200 


IS 






16 
17 

IS 


Murphysboro. 

Sato 

" 


2Sh. 


549 


19 
20 
21 


Big Muddy C. & C. Co 

Henry Langwith 

MuddyV.M.&Mfg.Co. 

Totals 


DeSoto 

Campbell Hill 
Hallidayboro. 


7 
2 

7 


15V 

Sh. 


:: 


46,000 

554 

232,238 


16, 330 

"ei.'oii 




911,194 


675.599 


235,595 




Averages 1 




























""■'"■""1 ■"" 







Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 21. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 2. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 21. 



Jefferson County — Seventh District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoface. 




Description. 




Output. 




1 

2 


I 
ft 

a 


11 


1 

g 

a 

la 

So 


u 
o 


o 

II 

/3 


'6 

o 
p 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 


Mount Vernon C. Co. 
G. W. Shelton 

Totals 


Mt. Vernon... 
Opdyke 


825 
6 


4.10 
1.6 


5 

5 


Sh. 


s. 

Hd 


B; 


46.000 
60 


30,000 
60 


16.000 




46, 060 


30, 060 


16,000 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 2. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



231 



Jackson County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 




§ 




Acci- 
den's 


















i 


3 








^.S 




g 


3 


o 




Price paid per 


S5 












Aggregate 

value 

of total 


1^ 


1 . 


C3 

1 
O . 


1 
o 
ft 

a 

o 


gross ton. 


ah 


o 
> 

1 








Capacity 
of 
mine- 
tons. 






g 
3 




product. 






:=; tit 


o S 


S'S 




o 

1 


o 

4/ 


"5 


1 




Z 


< 




^ 


o 


< 


H 


fc. 


i. 


CU 


Q 


W 


fe 


A 




1 


$1 20 


842,581 


20 


10 


10 


40 




$0 50 


S-M. 350 


225!.. 




40.000 


2 


1 20 


73, 076 


25 


15 


12 


52 




29 


•• 235 


375!.. 




100,000 


•^ 


1 20 


92,653 


40 


20 


15 


75 




29 


" i 270 


4251 1 


1 


120.000 


4 


100 


205,842 


255 


50 


30 


335 


$0 36 


29 


" i 261 


2,320.. 


12 


300,000 


5 


1 00 


14,217 


43 


12 


12 


67 




29 


"10 


138'.. 


4 


80,080 


6 


1 00 


102. OSS 


100 


22 


18 


140 


36 


29 


" , 209 


1,030 .. 


4 


150,000 


7 


1 50 


16,031 


151 3 


4 


22 


36 




'• I 310 


75|.. 




20.000 


H 


1 50 


2,004 


5 1 


2 


8 


90 




W. 200 


30.. 




3,500 


9 


1 00 


150 








50 




"55 


5.. 




1,000 


10 


1 00 


460 


2l 


1 


3 






•' 1 150 


18'.. 




1,000 


11 


1 00 


1,320 


31 1 1 


4 






" 200 


50;.. 




1.000 


1'> 


1 00 

1 00 

95 


208 

320 

13.642 


25 






2 
47 






" t 60 

80 

SM. 170- 


46o' : '. 




1.000 


IS 










1,000 


u 


15 


7 


36 




25.000 


15 


80 


8,08C 


14 


4 


4 


22 


36 




" 160 


420 .. 




20,000 


16 


1 00 


^3,459 


45 


9 


4 


58 


36 




" 200 


1.200 .. 




35,000 


17 


1 25 
1 25 


344 
531 


2 
2 






2 
2 






•'70 
" 1 80 


90.. 
100 .. 




1,000 


18 










1.000 


19 


75 


27.968 


50 


10 


10 


70 


36 






115 


800 1 




100,000 


•'0 


I 


526 
183. 379 


2 
210 






2 

270 








105 

22: 


201.. 
6,657!.. 

14,457 2 




1.500 


21 


30 


30 


29 




300,000 






S808,849 


864 


201 


160 


1.225 






'>^ 


1,302.000 




$1 01. 1 












$0 32.3 


$0 30.5 




,70 






















1" 







* Average for 416.193 tons. 
t Average for 490,977 tons. 



Jefferson County, 1898 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 




Wages. 




c 





Acci- 


















1 




den's 






ra 




a 


a 

3 


o 




Price paid per 


E.M 




— 










£ 


^ 


■S 


»:■ 


gross ton. 


^5: 


f" 


s 






Capacity 

.of 
mine- 
tons. 


SI 

a 

3 




Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


i 

° o 
da 


&t5 

i 


1i 

G 3 
OJ o 


p. 

1 
1^ 


~3 
3 

a 

Sa 


ll 

a s 
sa 


c ^ 

a^ 
32 


1 






1 


1 
1 


Z 


< 


^A 


o 


< 


H 


fc 


u, 




Q 


M 


fa 


Iz; 




1 


SI 10 S45.000 


35 


10 


10 


55 


$0 50 




w. 


280 


500 






60.000 


VI 


1 50 


90 


2 






2 








12 








1,000 
























$45, 090 


37 


10 


10 


57 










61 000 




$110 












$0 50 






146 



































232 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Johnson County — Seventh District — 1898. 









Description. 


Output. 




1 
1 


I 

".£] 


s 


i 


"0 

.a 


1 








i 


Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


§ 
o 


Si 


M. 




0) 

2 

o 


o 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 










^+j 






f o 










s 






p, 






^ 


n 
















.a =4-1 




ja 












z 






Q 


Eh 


o 


CB 


CO 


^ 








1 


D. J. Wallace New Burnside 


20 


3.4 


3'd. 


Hd 


B. 


360 


360 






NewBurnsideC. Co..! 


30 


3.8 


2 SI. 


Ho. 




540 


440 


100 


3 


Thomas Mc.Michael...: " ! 18 


3.4 


3 D. 


Hd 




400 


400 




4 


James Powers " 20 


3.4 


3 " 






650 


650 




5 


Walter Smith " 22 

Totals. . ..1 . .... 


3.4 


3 " 






80 


80 






2 030 


1 930 


100 




Averages 































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 6. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 1. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year, 2. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 5. 





Pe7' 


•7/ County - 


—Seventh District— 


-1898. 








Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 
a 


4^ 

«£ 

§ 

=4-1 

o 




a 

3 

a 

O OJ 

1=^ 


O 

o 


a 

1 

o 

U 


1 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 

^'> 


DuQ.U.C.C, Brown'g. 

•• Enterpr. 

" Egypti'n 

Superior Coal Co 

Jupiter Mining Co 

Horns Colliery Co . . . . 
(xreenwood-Davis C.C 

Pope Mining Co 

Morris Bros. & Co — 

Thos. J. Howell 

III. Cent. Coal & Salt C 
J. W. Howell 


DuQuoin 

St. Johns ;.;;.■ 

Sunfield .'.'.'.'.'. 
Tanaaroa 

Pinckneyviile 

Cutler 

Denmark 

Willisville.... 


45 
90 
90 
62 

i 

38 
44 
25 
72 
300 
28 
80 
200 
200 
90 
86 
35 
35 

122 
80 


6.6 

6.6 

6.6 

6 

6 

7 

6 

6.2 

6 

6 

9 

6.6 

6.5 

5.6 

5.6 

6 

6.6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5.5 

5.5 

6 


6 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

i 

6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


Sh. 

SI. 
Sh. 


s. 

i": 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 

S. 
Ho. 

S. 


M. 


94.000 

102,000 

82,000 

890 

42.915 

95,061 

44, 603 

6,550 

10, 500 

4,402 

128,068 

220 

23.360 

14,350 

9,000 

60, 164 

5,150 

1,678 

1,873 

35,000 

12,385 

400 

160 

70,600 


48,500 
52.000 
52.000 
515 
25.749 
76,331 
22,300 

81500 
4,342 
97, 956 

18, 100 
14,350 
6,500 
36,098 
4,550 
1,678 
1,873 
28, 103 
11.725 
400 
160 
39,600 


45,500 
50.000 
30,000 
375 
17, 166 
18. 730 
22,303 

■■"2, '666 

60 

30, 112 


13 

14 
15 
16 


Sun Coal& Coke Co.. 
Tamaroa Colliery Co.. 
Cicero Barber & Bro«. 
G. W. Brown 


5,260 

■■'i'soo 

24, 066 


17 

18 
19 
20 


Turner & Paust 

Woods Bros 

H. W. Duckworth 

Brown & Barwell 


600 

■■■6,'897 
600 


22 


Pr. d'k Rosendolf 

Peter Glass 




24 


Willis Coal & Min. Co 
Totals 


31,000 




845.329 


558, 100 


237,229 















































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 23. 

Number of new mines or places reopened during the year. 1. 

Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 24. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



233 









Johnson 


Con 


w^?/, 


1898- 


—Concluded. 












Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


If 


§ 

1 
<u 
0, 

.i 

1 


■6 

3 

■a 
1 

S 


Acci- 
den's 






^a 

11 

4^ 


Agrgregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


a 
2 
a 


a 

3 

tn 

. 

11 
6^ 


1 

■i 

a-d 

as 




a 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 






1 

1 


Capacity 


1 

i 

2; 


a 

cS . 

a 


it 

|a 


1 


"S 



mine- 
tons. 


1 

2 


$1 00 
1 15 
1 09 
1 00 
100 


$360 
541 
400 
650 
80 


3 
4 
2 
2 
1 


1 
1 


1 


5 
5 
2 
3 

1 


$0 56 
40 
36 
36 
36 




S-M. 


80 
100 
125 
160 

55 


15 
27 
16 
26 
4 


- 


m: 


1.500 
5.000 
1.500 


4 




1 


1,500 
1,000 












$1 03 


$2,031 


12 


2 


2 


16 






88 


10, 500 




$0 43 






88 






























Perry County, 1898— Concladed. 





Values. 




Employes. 




Wages. 




§ 




Acci- 
























1 


-d 

3 


den's 






S.2 




a 


a 
3 


> 




Price paid per 


2-q 






1 






.38 


Aggregate 


m 


o-d 


^ 


>> 


gross ton. 


"f 


> 


-3 






Capacity 




-d 


i 


mine— 








•S 


oH 


>> 










^ 











1 
a 

s 


2a 


of total 
product. 


a . 



da 


3^ 


11 

OJ 

S So 


a 

•3 
■5 


.an 

o'a 


1^ 

a 3 

a 


2 

'S 3 







£ 1 =« 


c3 

3 





•z, 


< 




^ 





< 


H 


fe 


^ 


Oh^ 










1 


$0 70 


$45,325 


70 


35 


« 


125 


$0 36 




S.-M. 


150 


1,900 




3 


200.000 


2 


70 


48,900 


85 


3( 


20 


135 


36 






150 


2,000 




1 


250,000 


3 


65 


.39,><00 


45 


25 


10 


80 


36 






160 


1,750 






175,000 


4 


85 


663 


IS 


4 


4 


26 


36 






20 


26 






25,000 


5 


95 


31.328 


50 


20 


15 


85 


36 






200 


900 


3 




75,000 


fi 


75 


69.423 


115 


20 


10 


145 


36 




" 


160 


1,950 




2 


200,000 


7 


1 05 


32,336 


80 
10 


15 


S 


103 


36 






120 


900 






125,000 


8 


65 


4,258 


4 


4 


18 


36 






100 


325 






25.000 


9 


75 


7,275 


33 


7 


6 


46 


36 




" 


180 


400 




2 


25,000 


10 


1 25 


5,473 


4 






5 


42 






225 


100 






7,500 


11 


75 


84,007 


105 


40 


45 


190 


36 






270 


1,500 


1 


2 


240,000 




100 
75 


220 
16,205 


2 
30 






2 

48 








40 
208 


4 

572 




.... 


2,000 


13 


9 


9 


36 




40,000 


14 


65 


9,32(- 


16 


6 


3 


25 


32 




M. 


126 


6O0 






30,000 


15 


65 


5,10c 


12 


5 


3 


2C 


32 






112 


400 






200,000 


16 


80 


38,505 


6!" 


12 


S 


88 


40 




S.-M. 


260 


2,100 






171,600 


17 


70 


3.575 


12 


2 


4 


18 


40 




M. 


200 


200 






150,000 


18 


1 15 


1.930 


2 


2 


1 




40 




W. 


180 


50 






40,000 


19 


1 16 


2,173 


3 




1 




40 






190 


52 


.. 




45,000 


20 


65 


19,646 


35 


6 


4 


45 


40 




S.-M. 


200 


1,200 


1 




55.000 


21 


70 


8,307 


S 


1 


3 




40 






130 


250 


•• 




300,000 


?l*^ 


1 00 


40C 


2 




1 










6(1 


10 






12,000 


09 


1 00 
75 


160 
48,300 


2 

75 






95 








30 
243 


4 

1.500 


'2 




1.000 


24 


12 


8 


40 


$0 33 


125,00© 






$522,637 


882 


255 


188 


1,325 










18.693 


7 


11 


2,519,100 




$0 76.5 












$0 36.8 


$0 33 




155 































234 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 





Randolph County — Seventh District- 


-1898. 








Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

2i 


«2 

o 

o 

o 

a 
P 


1 

It 
o fl 

ii 


1 

a 
pi 

a 

Is 


1 


n 

oj 

o 

o . 

11 


-i 
1 

o 

i 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 




Sparta 

CoulherVille';; 

Tilden 

Percy 


140 
80 
75 
36 
35 
370 
180 
70 
65 
30 
20 
18 
37 
22 
35 


6 

6 

6 

5.2 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

5 

6 

6 

6 

5 

6 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 

I 


Sh. 


s. 

Ho. 

S. 

Ho. 
HO. 


B. 


36, 184 
75,000 
18, 000 
20.000 

260 
23, 984 
30.611 
10,890 
17,576 
10, 000 

450 

600 
25, 977 
3,620 

920 


26,009 
75, 000 
18, 000 
20,000 

260 
21,112 
24,511 
10,890 
16, 576 
10, 000 

450 

600 
25,977 
2.500 

920 




3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 


BoydC. &C. Go.,No.l 
No 2 
111. Fuel &P'rCo.,No.3 
George F. (ierlach ... 
OoulterviUeMine. Co. 
Wm.Goddard. lessee. 
Wm.Goalby&SonNo.2 
Deans C. & .^I. Co.... 
Roseboro Coal Co. . ; . . 

•lohn Myers 

Dietrich Steamyer... 
[ll.Fuel&P'rCo.,No.2 

George Stan way 

Enterprise Coal Co .. 

Totals 


■■'2,' 872 
6,100 


9 




1,000 


10 


' ' 


11 






^'> 


' • 




13 
14 


Sparta 

Blair 


i 120 


15 














274, 072 


252,805 


21.267 




Averages 









































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 15. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 15. 



Saline Comity — Seveiith District — 1898. 





Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 




Description. 






Output. 




1 

1 


1 

1 
§ 

ja 
ft 
P 


1 
|| 

a; g 


J3 

a 

a 

11 

O m 


o 

ft 
o 

.a 
m 


a 

05 

Si 

u 
o 

£ 

o 
.a u 

i% 


i 

o 

a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


Tons 

other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 

5 
6 

7 
8 


Davenport Coal Co... 
HarrisburgM. &C.Co 

John A. Moody 

Dorris & Evans 

Wiley Odum 

George Rilying 

William Butler 


Harrisburg. . . 

Stonefort..".' 

S'th America. 
Cottage Grove 


144 

200 
13 
21 

'20 
20 

'•'7 
20 
25 
40 
15 
18 
20 
25 


8 

8 

4.10 

4.10 

4.8 

4.8 

3 

3.4 

3 

3.4 


5 

5 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


SI.' 

D. 

SI- 


s. 

Ho. 

Hd 
Ho. 


B. 


88,953 

3,362 

2,280 

2. m 

575 

870 

150 

180 

120 

140 

130 

200 

140 

200 

225 


74, 6t^ 
3,362 
2,280 
2,480 
515 

a 

140 
130 
200 
140 
200 
225 


14,334 

60 

130 


9 
10 


W. J. Stephens 




11 


H. A. Sittig 


I 1 I 




I** 


NoahStiff 




13 
14 
15 


J.J. Berry 

F. M. Jarrell 


4 
4 

4.6 



6 
6 






Totals 






100,005 


85.481 


14, 524 




















1 






" 
















1 





Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 16. 
Number of mines exhau.^ted or abandoned duri 



Number of mines exhau.^ted or abandoned durii 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898, 15. 



uring the year, 1. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



•2;]5 



Randolph County, 1898 — Concluded. 



p,<ri 

a.2 



0"= I Aggregate 

^-g value 

S a of total 

■^ o [ product. 



Employes. 



iiH 



Wages. 



Price paid 1 S.a 
per gross ton. m S 

. .-b 






n 




ACCI- 




d'nts 








%, 

i 


V 




o 




j 














•^ 


f- 




a 


o 












~ 










O 
















>> 


bJ 














Q 


W 


fe 


s^ 



Capacity 
of 



fi 


1 00 


7 


80 


S 


SO 


9 


90 


10 


90 


11 


1 00 




1 00 


\\\ 


90 


U 


90 




90 



831,548 
60,000 
14,4001 
18.0001 

■im 

22,261 

21,744 
8.712 

9! 000 

450 

600 

23, 379 1 

2, 922 1 
S28 



"" 


" 


15 


4 


5 


5 


5 


4 


5 


4 




3 






5 


5 
1 
1 



$0 40 
62 40 

17 1 40 
20 i 40 
2! 

44! 40 



S-M. 
M. 



1.3151 1 . 
1,500'.. . 

300, . . . 

:^50 . . ' . 

14..;. 

400' 



GOO . . 
800! . . 
550! . . 

42 .. 
50 .. 

425 .. 
76 .. 
20 .. 



7,406| li. 



120,000 
100. COO 
30.000 
30,000 
1,(00 
45.000 
60.000 
25.000 
25.000 
25.000 
2,000 
2,000 
35.000 
5,000 
3,000 

508, 000 



Saline Couni]j, 1898 — Concluded. 






Aggregate ^ 
value 
of total 
product. 



Price paid 
per gross ton. 



2j3 i =" . =M 



Capacity 
' of 
( mine— 
1 tons. 



1 SO 80 
80 



1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



13 
14 
15 


1 00 
1 00 I 
1 00 




t 

$0 81.8 



$65,429 

2,6 

2,280 

2,480 

545 

805 

150 

180 

120 

140 



200 

1401 2i 

200l 2; 

.$75,714! 113 



28 I 
28 
62 5 
80 I 



S-M. 



250 1, 
60 70 



50 



1101 
130! 
40 
90 1 
651 



! .J 



,.... 



Average for 98, 170 tons. 



236 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 





Washington County 


-Seventh District— 1898. 






Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


Description. 


Output. 


1 

z 


1 
J, 

g 

a 


1 
Is 

"-a 
a =* 

1=2 


a 

a 
o 


o 

o 


© 

o 

*j p. 


1 

o 
a 


Total 
tons pro- 
duced. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 

2 
3 
4 


Hush Murray, lessee. 
P. D. Breuggerruan .. 

Adam Kuhn 

OkawvilleW.S.C.&Co 

Totals 


Nashville 

DuBois...! .■.!.■ 
Okawville.... 


425 
376 
296 
320 


5.6 
5 

5.6 
5.6 


6 
6 
6 
6 


Sb. 


S. 


?.- 


20,026 
6,256 

15. 720 
1.806 


17,026 
6,256 

12,576 
1,806 


3,000 




43,808 


37,664 


6 144 




Averages 











































Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 4. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 4. 

Williamson County —Seventh District — 1898. 









Description. 


Output. 




1 

1 


1 

OS 

".a 


XI 

a 


1 


13 

xi 


1 










Name of Operator. 


Postoffice. 


1 


Si 


li 


o 

t 


o 

Xi %, 


u 
o 


Total 

tons pro- 

du,-ed. 


Tons 
of lump. 


Tons 

of 
other 
grades 


1 








II 


o«. 


^ 


4 ^ 

f o 


■^ 
















JUl-i 
















'A 






Q 


^ 


'J 


c» 


OQ 


s 








1 


St. L. BigMnddyC.Co 


Carterville.... 


90 


9.2 


^ 


Sh. 


s. 


B. 


319,697 


189,596 


130, 101 


2 


Carterville Coal Co... 


" 


60 


9.2 


7 


' ' 


' ' 




113.378 


60, 176 


53, 202 


3 


Scott-WilsonC.C.No.l 




50 


9.3 










100.000 


60,000 


40, 000 


4 


'• No.2 




65 


9 




' ' 


' ' 




80, 000 


56,000 


24.000 


5 


John A. Young 






9.2 


7 


SI. 


Ho. 




3, 608 


3,608 




6 


O.&M.V.C.&M.C.No.l 


Marion 


60 


9 






S. 




108, 400 


60, 400 


48.000 


7 


No.2 




78 


9 




Sh. 




M. 


18, 500 


11,400 


7.100 


f- 


Ohio Valley C.&C. Co. 


' ' 


20 


9 




SI. 


' ' 




45,000 


23,000 


20,000 


H 


Crab Orchard C. Co. . 




40 


9 




Sh. 




H. 


22,500 


11,250 


11,250 


1(1 


William Jack . 


Herrins 


40 

8 

140 


9 
8 
9.6 


7 


St. 
Sh. 


Ho. 




160 
1,200 
39,670 


32. WO 


70 


11 


William Allen 


600 


12 


Big. M.C.&I.Co. No 7 


6,850 


13 


John Reid 


Lake Creek!!! 


40 
150 


8.6 
8.4 


7 




s7 




1,100 
59,080 


1.000 
33,675 


100 


14 


A. W.Crawford, lessee 


25,405 


15 


E. E. Ensminger 




25 


5.6 


6 


1). 


Ho 




525 


500 


25 


16 


Edward & Allen 




20 


5.6 


6 




" 




300 


300 




17 


R. L. Chaney 


' ' 


?(1 


5.6 


6 




Hd 




400 


400 




18 


W. C.Campbell 


" 


20 


5.6 


6 


" 






175 


175 




19 


Charles Notsinger.... 




22 


5.6 


6 








22C 


220 




2(1 


NeallyBros 


Absher 


1(1 


6 


6 


St, 






IOC 


100 




21 


Robert Shroiver 




7 


5 


6 








5C 


50 




'^? 


William Read 




7 
7 


5 
5 


6 
6 








50 
30 


50 
30 




23 


Grant Ritchie 




24 


William Ritchie 




8 


7 


6 


' ' 






8C 


80 




25 


E. W. NoTsinger 


' ' 


8 


7 


6 








85 


85 




2t; 


W. H. Willi-ms 

Totals 


Blairsville.... 


8U 


8.10 


7 


Sh. 


S. 




800 


750 


50 




915, 108 


548,355 


366, 753 








































1 1 



Whole number of openings reported in 1897, 25. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year. 3. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898.26. 



COAI IN ILLINOIS. 



237 



Washington County, 1808 — Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


a 


Q 


1 

3 
u 

1 

i 


Acci- 
den's 








s 


1. 

11 


1 


£§ 
-2 


1 

Is 

5- 


Price paid 
per gross ton. 


S3 

11 

Oh " 




■3 

? 




Capacity 


a 


05 

11 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


el 




mine- 
tons. 


1 

2 
3 
4 


$0 85 

70 

65 

1 25 


.$16,422 
4.379 
9,589 
1,258 


22 
10 

25 
2 


5 
3 

6 
2 


3 
3 

6 

1 


30 
16 
37 
5 


$0 37.5 

40 
30 
62.5 


:::::::: 


S-M. 

M. 
W. 


200 
125 
185 
150 


600 
175 
520 
40 


- 


■■■2 

2 


35.000 
15.000 
25,000 
5.000 




$0 75.1 


$31,648 


59 


16 


13 


88 






1,335 


80.000 




$0 36.2 






165 





























Williamson County, :/(§i'8— Concluded. 





Values. 


Employes. 


Wages. 


3 

t 



CS 


S3 


1 

3 
u 

1 
M 


Acci- 
d'nts 






£.5 

"a 


Aggregate 

value 

of total 

product. 


S 

a; 

3 


a 

3 

03 

1. 
25 

5^ 


I 

1 


.3 


1 



Price paid per 
gross ton. 


£3 

if 

£2 


1 


1 

3 



z 


Capacity 
of 


s 

3 

z 


3 

H 

^ 3 


a -5 


mine- 
tons. 


1 

3 
4 


.0,, 
65 
65 
65 

1 00 
70 
70 
70 
90 

1 25 

1 25 
90 

1 00 
80 
75 

1 00 
80 
85 
85 
90 
90 
90 
90 
90 
90 

1 25 


$169,029 

63.055 

51.000 

43, 000 

3.608 

69.080 

10.465 

24.500 

14,625 

162 

1.350 

33.648 

1.050 

37, 102 

381 

300 

320 

149 

187 

90 

45 

45 

27 

72 

77 

963 


114 

104 
65 
60 

95 
9 

50 

30 
2 
2 

21 

50 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
1 

1 
1 
2 
2 
2 


57 
25 
11 
19 

■■■■22 

8 
10 
6 


35 
15 
11 
11 

1 
10 

5 

■2 

1 


206 
144 
87 
90 
3 
127 
22 
70 
42 
3 
2 
45 
3 
62 
3 
2 
2 

2 
2 

i 

1 
2 
2 
3 


$0 30 
30 
30 
30 




SM 

W. 
S-M. 

4.. 

W. 
S-M. 


304 
204 
240 
200 
200 
220 
180 
200 
215 
15 
100 
260 
122 
100 
CO 
100 
100 
35 
45 
20 
21 
15 
18 
19 
20 
110 


8,667 
2,950 
3,000 
2,200 


i 


9 


540,000 
175, 000 
150, (.00 
150,000 


5 

5 

8 
9 
10 




75.. 

2,700 .. 

3501.. 

1,609 .. 

600 . . 

6 . . 

10 .. 

1,126 .. 

50 .. 

1,020 5 

1;; 

61.. 


5,000 


30 

30 

30 
30 
30 


'"■s6'25 
25 



25 


180,000 
40.000 
160.000 
100.000 
2.000 
3.000 


12 
13 
14 




15 


60,000 
2,000 


30 




125,000 
3,000 


16 
17 






1.000 










1,200 












1,000 


19 










8 
4 
2 




1.000 


20 






1.000 












1.000 


22 










1'- 

3 '.; 
3 .. 

20.. 

24.441 6 


1,000 


23 










1,000 










1,000 


25 










1.000 












3,000 












$0 77 


$525,530 


627 


174 


128 


929 






1,708.200 




$0 30 


SO 25 




120 
















1 







238 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Recapitulation by Counties- 





Mines. 


Products. 


Values. 


County. 


i 
1 

1 

a 


s 

02 


6 
1 

o 
.S 

to 

a 


i 

a 
S 


1 
g 

n 

•§ 
1 

< 


Total 
ions pro- 
duced. 


Tons 

of lump 

coal. 


1 

Tons 
of other 
grades. 


Tons 
shipped. 


Estimated capacity 
(in tons) of existing 
mines. 


Is 


o 

S 

P 

^5 


Gallatin 9 




8 






16.812 


16,527 


« 


10.022 


55.700 


$0 92.4 


15,368 


Hamilton... 2 




2 




1 


4,882 


4,882 







8.500 


1 25.2 


6.113 


Jackson j 21 


11 


10 


2 


2 


911. 194 


675,599 


235, 595 


836,004 


1.302.000 


1 01.1 


808.849 


Jefferson... 2 




Ij.. 


.. 


46,060 


30.060 


16,000 


8.000 


61,000 


1 10 


45,090 


Johnson..,. 5 




A 1 


2 


2,030 


1,930 


100 


840 


10,508 


103.3 


2.031 


Perry 24 


19 


5 1 


• 


845.329 


558, 100 


287,229 


762,534 


2,519,100 


76.5 


522.637 


Randolph... 1 15 


10 


5 




.. 


274,072 


252.805 


21.267 


249,236 


508.000 


85.8 


229.446 


Saline j 15 


2 


13 




1 


100.005 


85.481 


14.524 


69. 102 


175. 100 


81.8 


75.714 


Washington i 4 


3 


1 




■■ 


43.808 


37,664 


6.144 


24.900 


80.000 


75.1 


31.648 


Williamson.! 26 


10 

59 


16 
64 


3 

7 


8i 


915. 108 


548,355 


366.753 


835, 723 


1.708.200 


77 


525.530 


Totals ....{ 123 


3,159,300 


2.211.403 


947,897 


2.796.361 


6.428,100 




$2,262,426 






















$0 86.8 


























Whole number of openings reported in 1897. 124. 
Number of new mines or places opened during the year, 7. 
Number of mines exhausted or abandoned during the year. 8. 
Whole number of openings reported for 1898. 123. 



COAL IN ILLINOIS. 



239 



Seventh District— 1898. 



Employes. 


o 
>> 
•a 

ll 

!l 

hi m 

|1 


1 

s 


Casualties. 


Wages. 


Machines. 


I. 
a 
a 
o 

a 

s 
Z 


a 

S3 
o 
o 

It 


1 

i 


■6 


1 
p 

a 


o 

■a 


p 
2 


Average 
per gro 

For 

band 

mining. 


arice paid 
ss ton. 

For 
machine 
mining. 


a 

si 

a 

II 

1^ 


a 

S 
"o 

S3 
p a 
z- 


a 
>. 

I 


40 


12 

361 
20 
4 

443 

106 
31 
29 

302 


52 

8 

1.225 

57 

16 

1.325 

421 

144 

88 

929 


101 

75 
170 
146 
104 
155 
173 

78.7 
165 
120 


593 

11 

14,457 

500 

88 

18.693 

7,406 

2.147 

1.335 

24, 441 


1 




. 


3 


$0 62.5 
62.5 
32.3 
50 
43 
36.8 
40 
30.4 
36.2 
30 










8 










864 
37 


2 


23 


1 


8 


$0 30.5 


6 


36 


490,977 


12 


















882 
315 


7 
1 

6 


11 

3 
2 

9 


6 
1 


11 


33 


1 


4 


55.000 


113 










59 










627 


25 


3 


13 


36 509 










2,957 


1.308 


4.265 


135.9 


69,671 


17 


48 


9 


23 






10 


53 


582.477 




$0 34.4 


$0 30.4 


















" 







APPENDIX 

REGISTEK OF CERTIFICATED- 
MINE MANAGERS. 
HOISTING ENGINEERS. 
FIRE BOSSES. 

REPORT ON INSPECTION FEES. 



—16 



MINE MANAGERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



243 



EEaiSTER OF CERTIFICATED MINE MANAGERS. 
HOISTING ENGINEERS AND FIRE BOSSES. 



NoTE.^This list includes all the mine managers to whom certifieates were 
issued prior to January 1, 1899. 

The names which are printed in italic are those who hold both certifieates 
of service and subsequent certificates of competency acquired through exam- 
ination. 

The names which are followed by the abbreviation ''ex." are those who 
have exchanged certificates of service for those of competency, without exam- 
ination, under the provisions of the amendment of 1895. 

The postoffice addresses here given are those recorded at the time the certifl- 
•cate was issued, and m many cases are not the present addresses of the certifi- 
cate holders. 



MINE MANAGERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


1 Name. 


i Postoffice. 


4 fin ma Phn rli^ « 7' 


Rosboro 

Wanlock 

TaylorviUe 

Streator....!!!!!!! 






Adams, J. M 


Bauer, Valentine 

Baxter, William 

Beattie, John 

[ Beatty, James 

Beatty, James H 

Becker.F. W 

Beharelle, Alfred 

Bell, Richard 

Bell, William 

Belger, John 

Bengston. John A„ ex. . 

Bennett, James 

Bennett. John 

1 Berkstresser, W. A 

Betts, Joseph E 

Betz. Charier' <J 

! Bevard, John J 

Beveridge David 


... Clyde 




iLadd 


Ainsworth, Samuel, Jr.... 

Ainsworth, Thomas 

Aitken, .James. 


...IDanviUe 

... Mascoutah 




. .. Pinckuevviile 




Elmwood 

Ladd 

Belleville 


...Orchard Mines... 








...Streator 


A.7igeh Hiram 


Springfield 

Streator 

Murphy sboro 

BraceviUe 

Spring Valley.... 
Barclay 


. .. Nilwood 


Aneell, Charles 

Apblett, William R 

Atkinson, Edward 


...^Galva 


. Odin 


... Centralia 




iBelleville ... 


Armstrong, Thomas J 












Freeburg 

Edwardsville 

Petersburg 

Streator 

Mapleton 


...Clark City 




Biebel, Henry, ex 

Biggins. James 










...'O'Fallon 


Baker, (iustav 


Bird, George W 

Birtin, Henry 

Birtley, William P 

Blake, Alfred 

Blair, (tus 

Boettcher, F.J 

Boston, G.W 

Boston, James 

Bottomley, Edward 

Bottomley, John 

Bowers, Robert 

Bowie, James 

Brarktii. .lame" A 

Bradenburger, F 


...ICofifeen 

...IPana 


Back Thomas 


...'Springfield 




... HannaCity 


Bailey, .Joseph 


DuQuoin 

Bartonville 


. .. Murphysboro 


Ball Edward 


...New Athens 






Barlow, Henry 


Coffeen 

Bryant 

Cantrall 


...DuQuoin 


Barnett Oliver. . . 


... Oglesby 






Bct''/ioiirj \)i(lreii' 1/ 


Danville 

Mari'»sa. 


Wen on '1 


Jinrwell. .Jolin 


.. Braidwood 


Bate.-, ir. // 

Bates, R. D 


Winchester 




. .. Greeuview 

... Belleville 



244 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



3Iine Managers — Certificates of Competency — Continued. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Brockhouse SamTiel. . . 


Caseyville 


Davis, Thomas 


Dunfermline 




Davis.P.J 

Davis, William 




Brown John . 


Glen Carbon 


Litchfield 










Farmington 

DuQuoin 

Belleville 




Sparta 

Athens 




Dawson Richard 


Brueggreniann, George 


Deuns, Henry 


Percy 




St. John 

Muddy Valley.... 

Streator 

Colchester 

Peru 

Mt. Olive 


Denny John J. 


Snringfield 






Toluca 




Devlin, Tnomas H 


Serine" Vallev 








Burke George ex 


Dick, Robert 






Dickenson, James E 

Dickerson.J. L 

Dodd, William 


Belleville 




Moweaqua 

Pottstown 

Pana 

Sandoval 

Athens 

Pinckneyville .... 
.Madisonville,Ky. 
O'Fallon 


Danville 

Cable 


Cairns John 


Dodge, H.N 


St. David 








Cameron David J 


Donaldson, Wm 


Kangley 




Donaldson, James W 


Peoria 






Campbell, Thomas M 


Dooner.P. J 


Glenburn 

Danville 




Dougherty Daniel 


Virginia .. 




Birkner 




Muddy Valley.... 






Downing Timothy 


Briar Bluff. 




Gillespie 

O'Fallon 






Carroll John 


Duddey .John 


Pana. 




Tilden 






Chalderton .Jolm 


Lenz Station 

Seatouville 

Streator 


Duffner. J. W. 


Belleville 


Cherry John T 






Cherry James . 


Dunlop, John 


Odin 


Cherrv. W. S 


Durkin, Michael 


















Murphysboro 










Clark, Martin . ... 


Deca'ur 


Ehret, FrankA 


Wesley 




Braidwood 

Decatur 

Braidwood 


Eller William 


Edwardsville 








Clelland Robert 


Emery Joseph 


Belleville 


Clifford. 'Michael J 




Mt. Olive 




Worden 


' English, Thomas. 


Streator 


I'ollifr Frank J 


Hartonville 

O'Fallon 

Spring Valley.... 

DuQuoin 

Nilwood 

Riverton 






Colliiis, Richard J., ex .... 


Evans, John Nine. ex 


LaSalle 

O'Fallon 


Conity Patrick 


Evans, Albert E .. 


Streator 






Norris 


Cook Robinson 


Evans, John 0.,Jr. 


Caseyville 




Fagan Michael 




Conrad William 


Springfield 

Grape Creek 

Assumption 

Murphysboro 

Virden '.'.'.'. 






Spring Valley 








Craine John E 


Fohl, Bernard, ex 


Belleville 






Crampton, Edward 

Cranch.J. E 


Falcetti, John B 


Glen Carbon . . . 


Farnsworth, Lawrence, ex. 
Farrand, Wm 


Barclay 


Crank<haw Thomas 


Springfield 




• • 




Danville 


Crighton Robert 


Chenoa 

Farmington 

Middle Grove.... 

Spring Valley 

Sparland 


Fellows, Edward 


Streator 




Ferguson John 


Reed City 










Finfrock M. M. 


Pana 








Cumming, James P 


Fleming, ,Tacob 


Kewanee 


Braceville 

Gardner 




LaSalle 


Cumming. Thomas S 




Collinsville 


Fletcher, T. C 




Cunningham, Thomas 

Cunningham, Cormick 


Girard 

Springfield 

Belleville 

Murphysboro .... 




Foley George, ex 


LaSalle 


Foley, W.E 

Forsyfhe, Peter 


Mapleton 

Centralia 








Dale, Henry 








Braidwood 


Daniels James 


Belleville. .. . 


Frazee, William H 


Danville 






Franken, Senard 


Lincoln 




Lincoln 

Collinsville 

Cuba 




Peoria 


Davis Caleb 


Friska. Jan 


Edwardsville 


Davis.J. H 


Fritz. William, ex 


Breese 



MINE MANAGERS. CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



245 



Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 



Postoftice. 



GaffijJfan, Michael 

Garrity , .Tohu 

Gaul, Henry J 

Gavin. Barney 

Gell, Philip 

Gibson, Michael 

Gilbert, Uihvard 

Giles, William 

Gilchri.st..Johu W 

(tUss, William H 

(ToalI>y,.Jnhn F 

Goalby. William H., ex.... 
Goddard, Benjamin B. ... 

Goddard. William 

Godler, William 

<?olden, Gcoroe 

Golden, William D 

Goodall. George 

Grabuck, R. H 

Graham, Hiram 

Oraham, John W 

Graham, Louis A 

Graham, William 

Graham, David L 

Grant, Peter, .J r 

Gratz. Gottleib 

Granilick..Jui. M 

Gray, Thomas R 

Green, ArtUur 

Green,. Joseph, ex 

Green, John W 

Green, Robert 

Greenwood, John R 

Greenwood, Robert 

Greives, Peter 

Grindrod, William E 

Groom, John 

Grosspitch, August 

Ouest, Joseph, ex 

Guiney, James T 



Peter.-,burg — 

Riverton 

Ridge Prairie 
Springfield. .. 

Gilchrist 

Spring Valley 

Miantic 

Gillespie 

Gilchrist 

Pana 

Gillespie 

Percy 

DuQuoin 



Cuba 

Springfield. 



Assumption.. .. 

Staunton 

Virden 

Dunfermline.... 

Jacksonville 

Virden 

Springfield 

Peoria 

Hornsby 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Braceville 

Marissa 

Springfield 



Edinburg... 
DuQuoin — 
Collinsville. 
Belleville... 



Haddick..Tohn,Jr 

Hadd)ck, William, ex , 

Haddow, Thomas 

Hagerton, Joseph , 

Haile, George 

Hall, Matthew 

Hainsel. Daniel 

Halbert.J. A 

Hamilton, Thomas , 

Hanley,John H , 

Hardin, Joseph H 

Harding, Enos 

Harding, Thomas F , 

Harding. William 

Harkes, William 

Harrison, Ji,ariieM 

Harrison. John 

Harrison, John, ex 

Harrison. William , 

Harrop, James T 

riartman. Frank, ex. 



Cable 

Sherrard 

Pana 

St. John 

Ladd 

Braceville 

Lenzburg 

Westville 

Nashville 

Springfield 

Vandercook .. 

Birkner 

Danville 

Lebanon 

Coal City 

Streator 

Virden 

Odin 

Murphysboro. 
Seatonville, 



Hill, Marshall Carterville. 

Hillery, Edward Colchester. 

Hoffman, John DuQuoin.. . . 

Holmes, Thomas F Lincoln. 

Houston. Robert Percy 

Howell, Thomas H DuQuoin .. 

Howell. D.J 

Howells, Eben Braceville . 

Hoije, James Braid wood. 

! Hoye, William ; 

I Huddy, T. H Staunton . . 

I Hudson, Thomas Etherly. ... 

! Hughes, James Braidwood. 

Hughes.Johu W ; 

Hughes, Hugh J ' Pana 

Hughes, John J Litchfield... 

I Humme, J. A Hillary 

Hummert. Henry Breese. 



I Humphreys, Edward Murphysboro.. 

Hunt, Albert J (Edwards 



Iberson, -James Athen.s — 

Issin in gliaus, William. Lebanon.. 

Izat, William Litchfield. 



Jacobson, Charles P I St. David 

James, John .Mt. Olive 

James. Jonah Grape Creek 

J aques, Willi^im Belleville 

Jacques. Richard " 

Jefiord,R. H Kingston Mines. 

Jefford, Thomas H., ex — Kingston 

Jeffrey, Peter Carterville 

Jenkins, Alexander Dunfermline 

Jenkins, Thomas C j Murphysboro — 

■Jerremire, William M. i DuQuoin 

John, Evan D • ISpaulding 

Johnston, Cochran [Spring Valley... 

Johnston, Samuel [ Oglesby 

Jol ly, Thomas J j Collinsville 

Jones, Charles ' Marissa 

Jouea, David " 

Jones, D. L Taylorville 

Jones, Edward Oglesby 

Jones, Harry D ; Riverton 

J ones, John H DuQuoin 

Jones, Logan Marissa 

Jones, T. L Ladd 

Jones, William IMarissa 

Jones, W'illiam E i Sheffield 

Jones, William E Wesley City 

Jones, William M Tamaroa 

Jordon, Robert I Streator 



iMurphysboro. 



Hauck. Fred Glen Carbon. 

Heyes, Henry t Streator 



Hebenstreit, Bruno . . 

Hebenstivit.J. P 

Helf rich, Henry 

Henderson, Joseph .. 
Henderson. Thomas. 

Heuley.J. H 

Henley. Richard 

Heijpurd. (iiorge 

Henry. Frederick 

Henry.. lohnlT 

Henry. Philip 

Heriot, .tame.'- 



Staunton. 



Rentchler 

Coal City 

Marissa 

New Athens... 

Niaotic 

Tilden 

Kewanee 

Poutiac 

Kewanee 

Spring Valley 



Hetherii.gtoii, Ben,i. M.... LaSall 
Hiekey. John 'Springfield . . . . 



Kahle, Joseph Coulterville 

Kane, Charles H Dunfermline. ... 

Karrall. Edgar Braceville 

! K-'ating, James A Streator 

' Keay, A. H. S Seatonville 

1 Keay, John Springfield 

! Keefer. William Danville 

Keil, Matthew Dubos 

! Keil, Peter " 

, Kelley, Bernard ; Litchfiebl 

j Kelley. D. J iCarbon Hill 

Kelly. Frank S Ceutralia 

Keil V.Joseph G., ex Braidwood 

' Kelley. Robert D Carbon Hill 



I Kelly, .j D. Sr..." 
I Kempper. Henry. 



pper. Henry Gillespie 

Kerr, John Rushville 

Kidd, Alexander Osles y 

Kidd, Andrew " 

Kidd.W Ridge Prairie — 

Kidd.SeiiQene "' 

Kieubush, David Edwards Station. 



246 



STATISTICS OF LABOE. 



3iine Managers — Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 



Kirby, James 

Kirchner, Frauk 

Kirkwood, Martin. . . 

Klinginfus, Otto 

Kloever. Joseph 

Knies. Henry 

Kortkamp. William. 
Krmner, Anthonij Jf' . . 
Krantz, Jacob 



Athens.... 
Belleville. 
Berkner .. 
Belleville, 

Pana 

Breese 

Hillsboro . 

Sato 

Belleville. 



Lacour, August Bartouville 

Laesser, Adolph Belleville 

Lander. Alexander, ex Carterville 

Large, James -M Athens 

Laws, J. M Cuba 

Lawson, John Mt. Olive 

Lav?son. Thomas Lake Creek — 

Lee, Robert Cable 

Lee, Sh'.^lcross G Canton 

Leming, W. C DuQuoin 

Lettsome, William Carbon Hill . . . 

Lettsome, Absalom...; — 

Lewis, James .Bryant 

Lewis, William IStreator 

Lindley, Riehard ICoUinsville . . . 

Lindsay. John O DuQuoin 

Linsky. P. J JBraidwood 

Lister, James H j Peters Station 

Little, Thomas Summertield . . 

Lloyd, David J lEdiuburg 

Lloyd, John E Danville 

Lloyd. Thomas Rentehler 

Logan, Thomas J iStreator 

Long, Thomas jWaulock 

Lord, John S Springfield 

Love. John W... ICarbon Hill ... 

Lowery, Frank 'Orchard Mines 

Lumaghi. Joseph iCoUinsville 

Lumaghi, Louis F j 



Macke, P. H 

Malcolm. William J 

Malloy, Henry S j 

Maltby, William j 

Marland. John. Sr.. ex 

Martin, George 

Mason, Eli 

Mason, Mark. ,/;- 

Massie, John G 

Matthews, W. S 

Maxwell. Angus 

Mays. John F 

Medill, Duncan 

Mcehan, PatricJc 

Meehan. Peter 

Michaeli.-^, Theodore 

Millard, John 

Milbnrn, Thomas 

Middleton, James L 

Mk-hiivlH, Leivis j 

Micha^-ls. Otto L 

Miller, Alexander 

Miller, Hugh 

MiUer. VfUliam j 

MUeni. John ! 

MilUtt. Tkomaa 

Mills. T.J ! 

Mitchell. T.J 1 

Moffatt. R. E ! 

Mojfat, Thor,H(s | 

MoHuakan. Udward I 

Moore. Samuel . | 

Morlaud. Joliu, Jr j 

Morni.J'-reutKil! I 



Ledford 

Braceville .. 

Decatur 

Braidwood .- 

Wenoua 

Parmiugton 
Edinburg 



ato 



Marissa 

Kinmundy 

Carlinville . . . 

Pana 

Oglesby 

Breeds 

SVilliamsville 

Belleville 

Peoria 

Loceyville — 

Sandoval 

Belleville 



Morrin. D. A 

Morgan, George . . 

Morgan, Joseph — 

Morris, G. W 

Morris. J. H 

Morris, P. K 

Morris, William M . 

Morris, Joseph, ex. 

Jlorrisey, Thomas. 

Morrison, D. H 

Moi-ton, Andrew . . . 

Morton, liobert .... 

Mould, Thomas R.. 

Murphy, Jerry 

Mnrphu, John 

.Murphy, Patrick... 
i Murray, A 

Murray, David 

Murray. Hiigh 

j Murray, J. H 



Danville 

Springfield 

Streator 

Lebanon — 
Xashville... 

Roanoke 

Belleville... 
Nashville... 

Lebanon 

Girard 

Virginia 



O'Fallon.... 
Chatham . .. 
Braidwood , 
Springfield, 
Nashville... 
Sparta 



iva . 



McA 
McC 



Ridge Prairie 

Coal City 

Lenzburg 

Norris 

Collins ville... 

Cable 

Pana 

Percy 



Carbon Hill 
Springfield . 

Wen on a 

Danville.... 



Plec'tor IStreator 



Patrick ' Lincoln , 

. John Cantrall 

MrCU'i-ij, Ja»j(c.s Kangley 

McCliutock. John Murphysboro . 

McCrindle, David Oglesbv 

McDonald, Robert Streator 

McDonald, William Braidwood 

McFadden, Jos Danville 

McFarland, William A Edwardsville . 

Mc(7eachin. Robert Sorento 

McGinnis, John Springfield 

McGunnigal, John Murphysboro . 

jIcGunnigal, .James Marissa 

McGnni'jul, Bernard Spring V^alley. 

McKeau. Isaac Coal City 

McKeown, Prank Decatur 

IlcKernan. JaiHts Collinsville ... 

McKillop, Donald Carbon Hill . . . 

McLean. Robert Girard 

McManaman. Patrick F... Spring Valley. 

McMorrow. Michael Parmington . . . 

McMath, George Carterville — 

McMurtie. A. B Bryden 



Nael, Reese 

Neal, Albert M 

JVcal. Willi a III. 

Needles, Thadeus , 

Neil. Peter, ex 

Newman, Henry T 

Newsam, John , 

Newsam. Richard , 

Newsam. Richard, Jr 

Newsam, Thomas 

Newsam, Thomas. Jr 

Nesbit. Charles, ex 

Neveuer, .John 

Nicholson. George A 

JVicholsoit, tVilliam 

Nolri, Fred , 

Nordeen. Peter 



O'Brien, John W .. 
O'Brien, John .J ... 
O'Brine, Patrick J. 
O'Brine, William .. 
O'Connor, James .. 

O'Connor. John 

O'Lep.ry. John 

Opie. William 

Owens, Robert 



Kangley 

Murphysboro ... 



Glenburn 

Bunker Hill 

Springfield 

Kingston 

Orchard Mines.. 
Kingston Mines. 



MiUstadt . 
Belleville. 
Cuba 



Freeburg 
Galva..:.. 



Toluca 

Marcjuette 

Spring Valley. 

Pana 

Spring Valley. 

Braidwood 

Marquette 

Sandoval 

Marion 



MINE MANAOEES. CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



247 



Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 



I'arker. Albevt iColinsville 

Fatche-t, Jolm Murphysboro . . . 

Patterson, J. C 'Assumption 

Peart, Joh n 1 Bi-aidwood 

Percell, Thomas |Norris 

Peters. J. D Murphysboro . . . 

Pettier. Mo.-es Spriuir Valley... 

Phillips. .James Minonk 

PicK--tt. Robert Sprinsr Valley... 

Picton, .Joseph .St. David 

Pierce. William Kilinliurg 

Pool, Edtiar E ^lufphysboro . . . 

Potter, (jeorg-e ^iaiih tnn 

Postle, .John UrncevillH 

Powell, Albert E iiell.-vii],. 

Powell, Evan .Alnrr'nvsboro ... 

Powell, David. e.\- P.rac-eville 

Powell, .J. E I Sato 

Powell. Thomas H i Belleville 

Powell, Samuel i Roanoke 

Prince. Thoinas !t-rillesT)ie 

Pryce. .lohn II .Toul Valley 

Pusrh, Driniel St. .John 

Pullen, ClHirk-s l/irchtield 



Raby. Robert A iCuba 

Radford. Thomas, ex liloomington . 

Iiadf<-r':l. WiUiaui iUuba 

Rae. Robert iBrindwood .... 

Ramsey. Charles -J ! Gillespie 

Itaiiiiie. Jexfe jEirkner 

Rauth. John ' Belleville 

-Rasmussen. .James E i Mineral 

Reasan, Daniel iMnddy Valley 

Reavley, Robert Riveiton 

Redyard, .1 ohn Odin 

Reed. W. M JGirard 

Daniel I Danville 



Sprinsjfield ., 

Marion 

Danville 

Belleville.... 

St .John 

East Peoria . 

Pana 

Litchfield.... 
Carterville .. 
Mt. Olive . . . . 

Clinton 

Trenton 

Streator 



Gardner .. 



Reid. Andrew 

Reid, Joseph 

Reilley. Edward 

Reimann, John 

Rennison. Hejiry 

A'ei/ii'j/dK. \Vii!i(i:iii .... 
Rhodes, Jefferson . . . 
Richardson, -loseph . 
Riebardson. Robert.. 

Ridgrely. O. L 

Ritchie, Ale.x., Sr 

Ritchie. A., Jr 

Roberts, Ben.iamin D 
Roberts, JoliuD., ex.. 

Robinson, Henry 

Robinson, John T iKingston Mine 

Rrtddeti, .lohn 'Pana 

Rodenburi?. Charles I Belleville . . . 

Roe, Samuel Oiflesby 

Roe, Thomas j 

Rosrers. Josiah Braidwood . 

Rollo, Georije i Mount Olive 

Rollo. John Gi llespie .... 

Rollo. William I Pana 

Rookin. Thomas IKdwards Station 

Ross. David Oi-'lesby 

Rowland, Charle.s. ex 1 Believ J lie 

Riindle. .lohn C |Colclie>ter. . . . 

Rutledirf. Wall on i Alton ..» 

Rntledtre. .1. .1 |Stannton 

J^i/aii. .fiifiici' iSpringfield . . . 

Ryan. Thomas 1 N. Springfield 



Saufrrelet. Ttlarsliall Mount Olivi 

Sansom. Henry S.,ex iSti-eator ... 

Sauei-, Frederick i Belleville ,. 

Scaife, William ICoal City .. 



I 

Scholl. Joseph IBartonville 

Schramm. Richard Belleville 

Si.'ully. William J Glen Carbon... 

Scurrah, Castling R 'Braceville 

Secor, Frederick D |Odin 

Senioe, George I St. John 

Sevan, Charles Danville 

Sharp, Montgomery, ex Coal City 

Sholeen, ii. A Galva 

Sholl, Joseph, ex Bartonville 

Shields, Frank D ;Pana 

Shuler. Charles Gilchrist 

Sidiill, John S Pana 

Sidall, James Streator 

Sim kin, Samuel i " 

Simmons, Thos Canton 

Simpson, Isaac Glen Carbon... 

Simpson, David Spring Valley. 

Simpson, GeorgeA .Springfield.... 

Siriii'soti. George C '" 

Simps.,:,, William J Collinsville. . . . 

.■^lui'.iMni. Thomas " 

Simpson. Thomas O'Fallon 

Sisk, A. J Eouality 

Skinner, Alexander Diamond 

Skinner, David i " 

Skinner, Jolm I " 

Skinner, John 1 Astoria 

Sloan, Edward C :Wesley City... 

Small. James |. Middle Grove . 

Sniethurst, .Nathan iSpring Valley. 

Smitli. Alexander M Sandoval 

siiiiih, DnrUI !' 'Dawson 

■'■""■'■ ">''■ ■ !Birkner 

■m: ■ '- i-L;-e A .Sandoval 

-- .;: , • -Mes h -Mount Olive... 

s ,!■: , -I lines L Riverton 

Smitii. .lames P Collinsville- ... 

Smit!i,.l()si-ph Blooniington . . 

Smith. T. J Pana 

Smith, William .\thens 

Sniitli, Willi;ini G Riverton 

Smith. W. .r Girard 

Su.'ddo>], Richard , Vinlen 

SoUenberger, Harry C Dunfermline .. 

Sijires, Alfred j Braceville 

Springer. Albert R | Glen Carbon... 

Staehle, August i Belleville 

I Stanton. William E.,ex Colchester 

I Steel, Alexander Streator 

Steel, Daniel Collinsville.... 

I Steel. James Spring Valley. 

! I Steel. Neal Centralia 

\.\ s'firnrl, D. G Seatonville . . . . 

Stirrat, James Peoria 

Stockett. Howard N' . 

Stoekett, Lewis 

Stockett. Thos. R.. Jr 

Stockman. W. H 

Storrie. Archibald ... 

Stratman. Henry, ex . 

Strebel. Georsre 

.Strickland. .John 

S'ltio,',. Jhomas 



..Springfield ... 
.. Collinsville... 
..St. Louis, Mo. 

. . DuQuoin 

.. Seatonville... 
. . Springflehl ... 
. . l*^dwardsville 

...Coal City 

.. Millstadt 



Swansberg. .John L Danv 

Swarthour. J. P Peori 



Tallraan. John, ex Knngley ... 

, Taylor. Charles Edwards . . 

!l Taylor, I>auiel "' — 

Taylor, Henry Belleville.. 

Taylor, James Edwards . . 

Taylor, Joseph Springfield 

Taylor, Thomas, ex O'Fallon ... 

Taylor, Thomas, ex 'Springfield 

Thorn, Alexander, ex Coal City . . 



248 



STATISTICS OP LABOR. 



L\Iine Managers— Certificates of Co»y:>e^enc^— Concluded. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 




Carbon Hill 

Westville 

Ladd 

Collins ville 

Spkulding 

Ridge Prairie .... 

Barton ville 

DeSoto 

Murphysboro 

DuQuoin 

Trenton 

Kingston Mines.. 
Murphysboro .... 
Coal Valley 

Kiumundy 

Springfield 

Lincoln 

Springfield 


Whennen, Charles 

Whitaker, John 

Whitaker, William J 

Whitehead, Joseph 

11 (7'/, James 

Wiley, Robertson 

W' ilkinsou, Frank 

Wilkinson. T. H 

Williams, James 

Williams, Jeff 

Williams, John 

Williams, Louis 

1 Williams, KobeitH 

WiUunns Walter 

1 Williams, w. w\. ■.;;'. ■.;■.'.;■ 

1 Williamson, Wni 

Wilson. David 


Oglesby 

ICollinsville 


Thomas, H 


Thomas John R 


Thomas, T. J 

Thomas Reese 


iFarmington 

'Murphysboro 




Thome. Martin, ex 


Westville 


Th oinpsori , John 




Thompson, Robert C 


Murphysboro 

1 Parmington 


Thorand, Joseph 


Tolle, E. B 


iBelleville 

Girard 


Tregoning, Walter 


Twomley. Edwin, ex 


[DuQuoin . 




Hornsby 

Staunton 


Vallow, Charles 


Murphysboro 


Vandebur, John, ex 

Vicary, John, ex 


W^Usou, Hugh 

Willson, Hiram 


Kinmundy 

iCarbondale 


Vose, John 


Wilson, H. C 

WMlson, John B 

Wilson, J. G 

Wilson. John J 

Wilson, Robert 


Pekin 




Sparta 


Wagner, I 


Cuba 

Wesley City 

Roancke 


W^allace, David 


Cartprville 

Bartonville 

Peoria 


Walland, Ed. S.. ex 


1 Wilson, Thomas 




Walschtag, Stephen.. . 


! Wilson, W. R 

Winning. James 

1 Winning, Robert 

Winterbottom. John 

Winters, Samuel P 

Wolschlag, Stephen, ex ... 

Woods. William, ex 

Wright. John 

Wright. J. W 


iReedCity 

iCarterville 


Walsh, Patrick 


Springfield 

Staunton 

Riverton 


Walters Wm H 


Wanless, Isaac. 


Murphysboro 

Bartonville 

j Peoria 

Morris ... 


Wanless. WiUiam 


Wantling. T. J 

Walters, Thomas W 


Peoria 

Ladd 

Elmwood 


Watts, Thoma.s J 

Watts, William 


Belleville 

Kingston Mines.. 




Streator 

Mt. Olive 

Springfield 

Pekin 


Weisenborn, F. E 




W^estwater, David 


Young, Hugh G 




Westwood, Albert . 


Belleville 


Zoller Robert H 






Streator 

Belleville 




We.ttvjood. Thomas 




Wheatcraft, James 


Elmwood 




■ 


MINE MANAG 


ERS HOLDING 


CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Adams, CharUf: T 


Rosboro 

Newcastle \ 

Streator 

Belleville 


Christie, Darid 


Murphysboro 


Alsopp, William H 

Anderson. WUiiain 


Collier, Frank J 

Cooper, Charles. .. 


Bartonville 

Nilwood 


An.'lreag. Anqust 






A-nqel. Hiram 






Atkinson, Edward 

Axford, Thomas 


Streator 

Petersburg 

Sunfield 

Lincoln 

Cuba 

Cutler 1 


Cummings, William 

Cusack, M 


Rushville 




Dale, John 




Bailey. Robert 

Bangart, Henrij 


Davenport. John 

Darix. Caleb 


Harrisburg 










Deans, Henry 


Percy.... 


Bates. W. J/ 


Winchester 1 

DuQuoin [ 

Pekin 

Green view 

Cutler 

Pinckneyville ! 

Grape Creek 

Danville 

Elmwood 

Sorento . 


Bolander. John 

Bracken, James A 

Brown, Jabez 

Brown, Thomas M 

Bunting, .J. H 

Bii^liOiifj. Aiidreir J/ 


Dufne'r,J. ir 

Ensmiuger. Emanuel E... 
Eutwistle, Robert . . . 


Belleville 

Crab Orchard.... 
Colchester 




West Belleville .. 


Esper, Peter 

Far/an Parrick 


Spaulding 


Caldwell, James . 


Fletcher Adam 


L-tdd 


Cameron, Duncan S 


Forsi/the, l\t,r 

Forsytlie Thauas 


Centralia 


Cape, Thomas. 


Pairview 




Chere, George j 


Pleasant Plains.. 


Fowler. Henry 


Millersburg 



MINE MANAGERS. CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



249 



Ceriijicates of Senrice — Concluded. 



Postoffice. 



Franken. Ikrnard. 



Gilbert, FAhrard 

Glenn. .Tolm 

Go'ller, lU/Uarn 

(•'olden, George 

Graber. Henry 

Grant. David 

Gray, John 

Gretii, liolxrl 

Gree/i'voo'i, liohert.. 

Grieve, Peter 

Griffith, William A. 



HadJick. Robert... 
Haensel, Daniel — 
JlarrUoii, Hnv-.<t.... 

Heinz, .John L 

Howe, William 

I{0!i-,.liu„e>< 

Hutton, .James 



Niantic 

Peoria 

Cuba 

Springfield 

Orchard Mines.. 

Pekin 

Roa'ioke 

Spring-field 

DuQuoin 

Collinsville 

Colona 



Cable 

Lenzbur^. . 
Strt-ator — 
l.aSalle.... 

Str^-ator 

Braidwood 
Tallula 



McGoimUjal, Bernard. 
Mch'eriiaa, .fames 



Spring Valley... 
Collinsville 



Neal, n-Mui)» 

iVichol.ion, WtUi'im. 
Noyd, Lewis 



Murphysboro. 

Cuba 

Galva 



Oesuer, Wendelin. 



West Belleville. 



Parkin, William. 
/'u:/er.son, .J. c... 

Pearl, John 

Pf auder, h'red . . 
PickHi, Robert... 
Pool, Edf/ar E . . . 

Price. David 

Price, James L.. 
Pulltn. Gliarlea ... 



Sweetwater... 
Assumption.., 
Braidwood — 

Peoria 

Canton 

Rlurphysboro. 

Fairbury 

Danville 

Sorento 



Jenkins, Eutrene 

Jerremirt , WilL'uun M 
Jomfi, IXti-'m. 



Keller, Georgre, Jr 

Kidd, Andrew 

Kidd, Xeugene 

Kirley, Bernard 

Klingrenhagen. Henry. 
Kramer, Aiulioinj F 



Bartonvillo 
DuQuoin... 
Marissa — 



Laumbattus, Philip H. 

Lenze, Charles 

Lloyd. Hosea W 



Bartonville... 

Wenona 

Ridge Prairie. 

Kewanee 

Belleville 

Sato 



R'ldfitrd, miliam.. 

Ji't'rn''". JesKt 

lifijnohU, William. . 
Royster, Moses L.. 
Rusche, Christian. 
Rijan., James 



Cuba 

Birkner 

East Feoria. 

Peoria 

East Peoria. 
Springfield . 



Tamaroa L 

Belleville I, 

Sheffield 



Mason, Mark, Jr 

Maule, Robert 

M^ehan,, Patrick 

Meelian, Peter 

Meredith, C.W 

MirhapU. Leiri.K 

Miller. Nicholas 

.Milt.r. Wilhinn 

Milim. John 

Millrii. J'homas 

Mofi'at, Thomas 

Mo'i, a<jhan , Edivard. 

Mori/i. Jeremiah 

Mono,,, Robert 

M'lrphij, JiJin 



McCherij, Jnmex 

McDonald. Daniel. .. 
McDowell, James A. 



Sato 

Belleville 

Breeds 

Williamsville 

Aueusta 

Belleville 

Lebanon 

Lenzburg 

Norris 

Collinsville 

Percy 

Carbon Hill 

Danville 

Virginia 

Braidwood 



Kangley . 



Schmidt, Frank P.. 

Shaw, Nathan 

Sviith., Durid P 

sjniti:. Fdi^ 

Solomon, Roljert,... 
Spencer, George ... 
Stanway, George ■ . • 

Stark, Andrew 

■steivart, Darid J 

Stuhlsatz. Michael. 

S'ltl.on, Tliomas 

Swan, Charles 

Swisher, James E.. 



Limestone.. 

Kramm 

Dawson 

Breese 

Springfield . 
DuQuoin — 

Blair 

Galva 

Seatonville. 
Kewanee — 
Millstadt.... 
Oakwood . . . 
St. David... 



Telfer.AlPxander W. 

Terrill, Thomas 

Thompson, John 

Thornlo:' , Jam.es 



Waugh. George, Sr 

Wanless, William 

Weslwood, Thomas 

Wild, James, deceased. 

Wilkin, John B 

Williams, John 

Williams. John T 

Vr'illiums. WitJ-'r 

Wilms, William 



Morris 

Colchester. 

DeSoto 

DuQuoin... 



Peoria 

Riverton 

Belleville 

Murphysboro. 
Petersburg. .. 

Sato 

Coalville 

DuQuoin 

Springfield ... 



■ Grape Creek. 



250 



STATISTICS OP LAECE. 



HOISTING 



C03IPETEXCY. 



CERTIFICATES OF 



Note. — This and the foiiowiug' list inehide all the hoistins: engineers to 
whom certificates were issued prior to January 1, 1899. The postoffice ad- 
dresses here given are those recorded at the time the certificates were issued, 
and in many cases are not the present addresses of the certificate holders. 



Nai 



Po^tofPxoe. 



Xame. 



Postoffice. 



Ablen, Henry |Breese . 

Adams, Nelson iLincc 

Alexander, Henry ;Oir]esby 

Alexander. W. A jRosboro 

Allen, C.E 'Troy. 

Allen. C. H iSeneca 

Anderson. Flenry 'Lincoln 

Anderson, W, C lElrawood 

Anderson. Z. B [Sparta 

Andrews, Solomon Girard 

Appleton. Thomas IVirden 

Archibald, David iFieeburg 

Armstrong. C ,Muncie 

Ar rnstrontr, William C — Marion 

Ashman, Jeseph IMnrphysboro . 

Atkin, Robert R jTilden 

Atwater. Stephen Clarke City 

Averill, C. P Colchester 

Avery, William Lenz Station . . 



Bnrlinson. Aaron j Percy 

Burr. Chaun'-y Coiilterville .. 

Barrel], G. K Farmington .. 

Biitcher. Thomas ! Mnrphysboro 

Butt. Thomas R Litchfield 

Bryne. Michael I La'Salle 



Casle. Alfred iMarion. 

Cain. Daui>d IRidgely 

Cain, Daniel P j 

Cain, John 



Callear, Isaiic — 
Cameron. Daniel. 
Camp. John R.... 
C.tnip'.iell, Fre<i .. 
Campbell, W.J .. 
Cantrell, H. T.... 



Pottstown . . . 
Pana 

Westville 

Sor<^nto 

Coal City . . . . 
Farra'narton . 



Carniichael. Thos jSpringfield , 



Baker. C. H Fairmouat 

Barber, C. E I DuQuoin . . 

Barber. C. W 1 

Barnhill, H. G 'Kinmnndy. 

Barr, Prank Centralia .. 

Barton, C. W i Cable 

Barton. Charles W Pairmount 

Beard, Charles A Streator . . . 

Beatty, James H Mascontah 

Beattv,Ne:)ha 

Becker. Fritz Mt. Olive.. 



Bertin. He 

Bienert, .J. O 

Big-elow. A.E 

Blake. .Alb.:-rt 

Blair, Gorice 

Bohlen. Henry E... 
Boringr, l^'ia^ik ij. . . 
Boston. William H 
Bradbury, R. D .... 

Bradenbnrtr, F 

Brasel, S. R 



Pana 

.... Spanieling .... 

j Streator 

!!!! Mt. Olive!!;;! 

lOdin 

1 Mnrphysboro 

ICarbondale... 

:BeIleville 

iCentriUia 

Bretz. .Anton iGerraautown . 

Bro:::' > . •" ;iri's jCcal City 

Bro':;'^ ■ . ■: iirr.Sr....;.. Catliu 

Bi.. ■ ^-.Jr Kellyville .... 

Broi.-h;. •.; • .. '.. (; iCofifeen 

Brown, ( if,n"^r A lies Junction. 

Brown, Tliomas Moweaqna 

Bruegrgemann. Gpo Na.-^hville 

Buckley, Calvin W Sparh.nd 



(.'arpenter, Charles .. 

<'arr. Robert H 

Carrinirtou. Eugene. 

Chapman, J. H 

Chapman. William E 

Chew. B. R 

Christ. Philip 

Clark. C.N 

Clark, .John 

Clark, .Fohn 

Clark, Quintin 

Clickner. C. S 

Clitford, Michael 

Clifton. Wm. ti 

Coatney. Grant 

Collinton, Chas 

Collingwood, Wm 

Colton, (George C 



Girard 
Preeburg . . . 
Moweaqua. . 
Petersburg , 
Salisbury... 
Carlinville . 

Wenona 

DuQuoin . . . 
.Mjirqnette .. 

Virden 

Braidwood . 

Wift 

Kevranee . .. 
Sparland . ., 
Pairmount. 
B'-lleville... 
Green ^■ lew . 
Carterviile 



Couley. John Istrentor .. 

Connelly, J. J |Murphysh< 

Conway, Jolra ICollinsvill 

Conway, JM ichael ILadd 



Cornelius, Richard 

Cottle, Elmer 

Cotton, George 

Croker, Edward 

Cruickshanks, Robert 

Cummings, George 

Cumraing. Geo. A. P 

( 'umming, Geo. P 

Cummings, Robert W 



Kairmount — 

Buffalo 

Hallidayboro. 
Marquette — 
Middle Grove 

Pana 

Gardner 

Sparland 

Sparta 



HOISTING ENGINEERS. CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



251 



Certificates of ComjJetency — Continnecl. 



Name. 



Postoffice. 



Postoffice. 



Dan ah, John W Springfield 

Daniel. .Timies j Belleville | 

Daniels. Joel I " 

Dankins, Thos. J jBraceville 

Darmstadter, William iNew Atliens | 

Davis. Jackson 'Athens | 

Davis, E E I Aubiarn 

Davis, Frank Lincoln 

Davis, Harry J DuQuoin 

Davis, James P Belleville 

Davis, John W Lake Creek 

Davis, John 1 Belleville 

Davis, L. D [Coffeeu 

Dawsi n, Van. C jSprinsr Valley. 

Ueatou. L. B ITallula 

DeBacher. Thomas jElmwood 

Dee. Henry Glen Carbon... 

DeJarnett. Thomas Mr. Vernon 

Delmore. Krank .Springfield 

Delorey. William iWestville 

Dent. William i7)i;imond 

Di.k. Robert tSunfleld 

Dillon. John Auburn 

Dixon, George Wenona 

Dodwell. Edward J ! Decatur 

Doolin, E. W Pontine 

Dochrin?,', Fred Mt. Olive 

Dousherty, Joseph Tay lorville 

Dowler. John Auburn 

Dowliugr. Ira F | Springfield .... 

Drake. William iStreator 

Duffy. Glenn E ICollinsville. ... 

Duncan. J. R I LaSalle 

Dunstedler, Williaui S lEdwardsville. . 

Dyer, Harry I DuQuoin 



Friesl.ind. C. M ... 

Fritz, Gustav 

Fry. D. W 

Furgusoii, S. P 

Fusten, D. H 



Salisbury 

Breese 

Clark City.... 
Strasburg — 
Murphysboro 



Eddy, Evermont Athens 

Eastham, G. A (Tirard 

Edwards. George W. 'Sprinafield 

Elliott, Clarence Bryant 

Elliott, H. H Centralia 

Edwards. Thomas Spring Valley. 

Emans. Ransom R Farir.iut:ton ... 

Ellis. Albert Cable 

Elmore, V. M Cotfeen 

Knipry. H. W Greenville 

English. Thomas Streator 

Krisman. .lacol) D Niantic 

En.sman, Jesse " 

Evans. C. L Virden 

Evans. Price Bissel 

Evans. W. E Danville 



Fali;iy. John Decatur i 

Falkenstein. George A Astoria 

Farley, J ames i Kiverton I 

Ferguson. John J Spring Valley 

Ferris. W. H Marriuette I 

Fillinghiim. J. A Canton 1 

Finuigan. Thoma.s J .'Springfield 

Fischer, Phillip Lenzburg 

Fisher. George Staunton 

Flesh er. A Taylorville 

Fletcher. Henry A Latld ' 

Fox. Frank L Assumption i 

Forister, K'.bt Murphysboro .... 

Forist>-r, William '• ....' 

Forrney, John V,' Kinraundy ! 

Foster. A. J Litchfield I 

Fox. James B LaSalle 

Frain. Austin Ridge Prairie ' 

Fraukland. Tim Str.-ator i 

Freeman. :M. F Shelby ville | 

Fr.'Pman. F. F DuQuoin 

Friend. .1. W Collinsville 

Frier. Jacob Drnisi.v i 

Friend. William L ( •..Hin-Ville I 



Gateley. James 

Gates, William S .. 
Gallagher, Peter. .. 
Gaughan, James . . . 
Geer, Benjamin H. 

Geer, U. S 

Gibson, John 

Gillson.R. W 

Girfen, Henry 

Gladders, V.'illiam. 
Goalby, Arthur A.. 

Goalby, B. F 

(ioalby, Frank H... 

Gordon, E. J 

Gould, George 

Gowin, Frank 

Grace. John T 

Graham, L. A 

Greaves, Walter . . . 

Green, Daniel 

Green, Thomas — 
Greenhaigh, James 
Greenhalgh. Wm .. 

Grice, Albert 

Grieves. James 

Griffin, John O. .. 
Groom, John, Sr .. . 

Groom, James 

Groom, William ... 
Grubb, Michael.... 
Geistdorfor, Fred . . 

Guy, D.F 

Groom, John 



.Seaton ville . 
. Kankakee .. 
, Clark City.. 
.! Braid wood . 

. W<.l<'Otv 

. Pekin 

.Sandoval ... 
.Danville — 

.Troy 

.Coal City ... 
. I Percy 



Stookey 

Petersbiirg . . 

Sato 

Green Ridge 
Kewanee . . . . 
Bloomington 

Lfidd.... 

Braidvs-ood .. 

Marissa 

; Hills boro.... 



Kewanee . 
Birkner... 
Kewanee . 
Belleville. 



. iRiverton — 

.[DeSoto 

.Springfield 
. Belleville... 



Haddick, Willian. L. 

Haensel. Edward 

Haensel. David 

Hagler. diaries 

Half. William T 

Kail. iT. R 

Hamilton. J.-tnies H.. 

Hamilton. N. U 

Hand. P. L 

Handle. Ledlie 

Hanenstein. J. W 

Han.-s. W. J 

Hankins. John W.... 

Han vr-y. John J 

Hanvey. Robert 

Hanvey. \\'illiam — 

Hai'per. Frank 

Harding. Enos 

Harper, Oscar 

Hardy, Thos. W 

Harris, J. W 

Hartman, Frank 

Hawker. J. O 

Hayes, Arthur H . . . . 

Hayes, Jnmes 

Hayler, George L 

Head. Johns 

Hendrick. C. W 

Hennegan. John F. . . 

Henry, Philip 

Herder, Walter 

Herring, George 1'. . . 

Herring, J. P 

Hershaw. A. F 

Hess. Ed ward B 

Hillard. James 

Hill,C. C 



vSherrard . 
Lenzi'urg. 



Fredonia 

Troy 

Colchester — 

Sparland 

Murphysboro 

Peoria 

Taylorville ... 
Willisviile.... 



nn. 



Sorento 

Collinsville. 



Ed wards ville 

Bii-kupi- 

Lebanon 

Dawson 

Springtield ... 
Murphysboro 

,Pana 

Danville 

Bloomi5;gton . 
Murphysboro 
•'As'^umpiion.. 

(VFallou 

iWanlock 

jKev.-anee 

iEdwardsville 

Odin 

iStauiiton 

lAbingdon 

'.Morrisonvilk- 

'St. David 

Marrissa 



252 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Hoisting Engineers — Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Hill. C. W 


Pontiac 


Lockhart Louis 






Westville 

Astoria ; . 


Lockie, William 

Loebel, Frank 


Carterville 


Hilmes, Henry 


Hobbs, Francis E 


Centralia 


Lucht.M. F 

Luudley, Ralph. 


Mt. Olive 




Ridge Prairie.... 




Glen Carbon ....'. 

Gillespie ...'.'.'.'.'.'. 

Taylorville 

Kreeburgh 

Murphysboro .... 


Hopper George . . 




Hopper, H.H 




Herd, Alvin 


McConachie Ed 




Hotting-er -T 


McCormack, James J 

McCuUey.G. L 

McCunky, Tobias 


! Springfield 

Pawnee 

Assumption 

Springfield 

Percy 

Murphysboro 

Pana 

Herrins Prairie.. 

Carbon Hill 

Coal Citv 






Hughes, John C 


Springfield 

Murphysboro 

Pana 

Gillespie 

Rosboro 


Hull, Lee. 


McDonald, William J 

McFarland.F. E 

McGittigan. Thomas 

McGowan.J. R 

McKean, John 


Irwin, Byron 

Irwin, John 

Isadore, George 


Jacobs, George R 


Elmwood 

Moweaqua 

Murphysboro .... 


McKearnan.J. B 

McKee.C. L 


Athens 

Lake Creek 

Belleville 


Jacobs, .James M 


McLauchlau.F. T 

McLaughlin, George 


Carbon Hill 


Jacobs, W., Sr 


Murphysboro 


Jeffrey, James 


Marrissa 

Streator 

Danville 


McVey Frank W 








Jenkins. T. E 






Jenks, William 






Bloomington 

Birkner 


Staunton 

Coffeen 


Johnson, J. S 


Manley, Leo 




Main waring, James 




Johnson, Wm. H 


Pawnee 

Spring Valley 

Pontiac 

Freeburg 

Belleville 




Johnston, Joseph R 






Johnston, Thomas 










Sparland 

Murphysboro 


Jones, Henry E 


Marshall Robert 




Martin N W 


Jones. Jonathan. Jr 


Marissa 




Milstarlt-. 




Massie..J. T 

Matthews. C 

Maule. William. .. . 




Jones, Logan 


' > 


Willisville 


Jones, William 




Belleville. 


Jones. William 


Braceville 

Streator 

Edwardsville .... 

Streator 


Maxwell Fred 




Jordan. Robert 




DuQuoin 

Ledford- 


Judd, Charles E 


Meadows William 




Meyer, Henry 


Trenton. 




Michaels Otto L . 


Belleville 


Keating, Edward F 


Miller. A. J. F 

Miller, James 


Centralia.. 


Keating. Richard 


Alma 


Kelley, .James D 


Carbon Hill 

Fairmount '. 

Farmington 

Collinsville 

Ladd .■;;;;; 

Belleville 


Miller T H 


Raymond 


Kelley, Robert D 


Miller' William C 


Kidd, Alonzo 


Mills, Thomas S 

Monaghan, James 


Coal City 


Kilbride, T. C 


Gillespie. 


Killinger, C 


Moor F J W 


Springfield 

Belleville 

Springfield 

Pnvhnn Hill 




Morck, John 

Morgan, John C 


Kimber, John 


Kingerfus, Wm 




Staunton 

Carteryille 

Smith boro 

Belleville 






King, Alexander, Sr 


Morris, James H, 


Nashville 


King, Alexander, .Jr 


JNIoi-ris William 


Mt Olive 


Kiug,L.B 










Oglesby 


Klaus, Louis 


LaSalle 


Mulvany A T 




Murphy, Robert T 


Norris 






Trenton 


Lambert. George W 












Lavallier. U. S 

Lawson, George 


Chenoa 

(/able 






Layne, J. W 


DeSoto 




Lehman, Philip 




Lemons. J. L 


Girard 

Braid wood 

Catlin 

Streator 

Sherrard 

Murphysboro 


Nelson, Andrew V 


Centralia 


Leslie.N. B 


Nentzel, Fred H 




Lewis, Alvin 






Lindskey, Martin H 




Belleville 


Lmdstroni, Oscar 


Nicol,Adolph 




Little, Thomas 


Norborg. Peter 


Galva 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETENCY. 



25a 



Certificates of Competency — Continued. 



O'Brien, Terry Decatur 

O'Donnel), Michael | •' 

Ogden, Samuel Mascoutah. . . . 

Olingrer, J Odin 

O'Neal,. James iStreator 

Ople. Frederick |Mt. Olive 

Ord,S. R Mt. Vernon... 

Osburn,(Tlen L Streator 

Otto, John Collinsville... 

Outhouse, John Johnson City. 



Paddock, W . D \ Pana 

Paden, J. W Sprinff Valley . 

Parks, James Streator .... 

Patterson. R. J iMurphysboro.. 

Patterson, W. M i St. Louis, Mo . . 

Pearce, H. L Cable 

Peecher, David 1 Braid wood 

Pemberron,C. H jDuQuoin 

Perkes. Ephraim Vandercook . . . 

Petrea, J.W Icetitralia 

Philip-. J. M : Athens 

Piper, James Word en 

Piper. Oliver G Glen Carbon ■ . 

Pircher, Peter P Sandoval 

Pitra. Frank I Odin 

Pitt, Jo.seph iTrenton 

Pliramer, Benjamin (Streator 

Plocker, Henry !Pana 

Pointer. Edward H [Belleville 

Powell, Edwin jCasey ville 

Powell. F. C jSeaton ville . . . . 



Price, Thomas. 
Puffh, D.snicl 
Pullen,R. H. 
Pulver,R. H. 



Quick, A. T 

Quick, A. S. H.. 
Quigley, Henry. 



Raber, P. C 

Raber, Louis , 

Radford. William T.., 

Rafter, Mie-ba.] 

Handle, Caleb 

Randle. William 

Rasor, J. D 

Reagan, William 

Keatz, Hans 

Reed, W.J 

Reetz, Herman , 

Reid, Archibald 

Reilly, Henry 

Reimann,John 

Remelius, Jacob 

Renni, Andrew , 

Rennie, James 

Repplinger, H 

Rhodes, Almon R 

Rice.(\ L 

Rice, Moses 

Richards, John T 

Richmond. John E. .. 

Riley, B. J 

Rippitoe.J. G 

Ritchie, John 

Roberts, John 

Robert .S.Jonathan 

Robinson, Charles 

Robinson,.!. A 

Robinson, William A. 

Rockey, Charles 

Rodgers, Edward 



Spaulding: . 
St. John . . . 
Sorento. .. . 
Centralia . . 



Roy.A. L Collinsville. 

Russell. Zenas Pana 

Rutlitr, Isaac Ashland .... 



Sadler, (ieorge Murphy sboro. 

Sallade. J. E Chatham 

Sands, Robert K Marissa 

Savage, Richard Clarke City... 

Sawers, Joseph |Coal City 

Say lor, C. F Murphy sboro. 

Schaif er. Fred : B' lleville 

Scharinck, Frank Ed wardsville, 

Schmacker, Herman Glen Carbon.. 

Schroeder. Charles Mt. Olive 

Schroeder, Henry '< " 

8chnessel.('onrad iBreese 

Schulte, Fritz Clinton 

Scott, J.W... ; Colchester 

Secor. F. D Odin 

Seeman. John C if -antrall 

Seidel, Fred iKinmundy 

Seiler, William jOrmsby 

Shroyer, A. D i Lincoln 

Siddall, John i Belleville 

Siddall, Levi I " 

Slocum. Clarence 'Gilchrist 

Smith, Edward J Collinsville .. 

Smith, Georije W , Virginia 

Smith, George W 'St. Louis. Mo. 

Smith. S Marseilles.. .. 

Smyth. CM : Danville 

Sneddon. .John 'Fallon 

Sneddon, Richard Catlin 

Sowerby, Miles , Willisville. .. . 

Sparks, .J. L ,Mt. Vernon. .. 

Sparling, Charles jSeatonville. .. 

Sparlinir. Henry j 

Srout. .1 . W 1 Pontiac 

Stantcl. Martin Toluca 

Staiifonl, ,). W jPana 



Hallidayboro !i Stedman, Edgar iMissionfield 

Stedmnn, Robert, Sr Danville. ... 



Troy 

Collini- ville... 
Blooraington.. 
Marquette. ... 

Belleville 

Freeburg 

Staunton 

Mt. Olive 

Lincoln 

Danville 

Lini'oln 

Springfield ... 

roluca 

Belleville 

O'Fallon 

Dunfermline. 



Belleville 

Chenoa 

Harrisburg .., 
Murphysboro 

Staunton 

Coal City 

Cantrall 

Colchester 

Trenton 

Litchfield 

Willisville.... 

Wenona 

Riverton 

Toluca 

Peoria 

Murphysboro. 



Steel. E. H, 

S einheimer. Theodore... 

Stephen, C. H 

Steward, [j. A 

Stewart, James C 

Stewart. Peter 

Stone, Fran k 

Storm, Edwin 

Stout. F.M 

Stout, W. E 

Stowell, 3. W 

Streik. William 

Struse, Henry H 

Stuart, John 

Swartz. Fred 



Salem. 

Lenzburg 

Spring Valley. 

Mt. Vernon 

Carbon Hill ... 
Murphysboro.. 

Lebanon 

Worden 

Springfield. ... 

Rutland 

Bloomington. . 

Belleville 

Athens 

Ladd 

Toluca 



Taylor. Edwin 

Taylor, Mack 

Temple. James C ... 

Terry, W. F 

Thexton, Henry 

Thomas, Fred 

Thompson. J. H 

Tibballs. E. A 

Travis. Alonzo 

Travis, William 

Tregoning, Charles. 
Twomby, T'dward .. 



Trenton 

Westville... 
Springfield. 
Litchfield .. 
Rushville .. 

Rutland 

Marion 



Pana 

Birkner 

Car'erville. 
Coal Valley. 



Vandveer, Perry E . 

Vernon, James 'LaSalle. 



Taylorville. 



254 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Hoisting Engineers — Certificates of Competency — Concluded. 



Name. 


Postoffiee. 


Name. 


Postoffiee. 


Waggoner, William F 


Raymond 


Williams. William H 

Williamson, Henry 

Williamson, William 


Sherrard 

Coal City.. .. 


Walker John U 


Mt. Olive.. 






Hillsboro. •"■;■■■■ 




Wallford Noah 


Wilson, William H. 


Middle Grove 


Wallock. Charles 


Braceville 

Auburn 




Mt. Olive 


Walsh James D 


Woodward, J. R 

Woolbright, D. A 

Woodworth. Peter 

Wright, William M 

Yates. John 

Yates. William 

Yehling. Fred H 


Streator 




LaSalle 

St. David 

Pottstown 

Collinsville 

Braceville 

Belleville 

Elmwood 

Murphysboro 

Belleville 




Walton Joseph 


Pekin. 


Wantling. T. J 




Wandless W. S 












Watts T J 


(^oal City 


West W. H 




Westwood 'Albert 


Younp-. J. K . . 


(iirard 








White, ?Ienry 


Riverton 


i Young, Robert 

Young, A. 0. K 


LaSalle 




Sprinii'fleld 

Lincoln. 




White Robert 


Youngquist, Frank 

Zink Louis 


Sherrard. 


Wi-kersham. J. R 


Lake Cre'-k 

Spring-field 

Spauldingr 

Spring Valley 

St David 




Willia'ns Hu'^ton 


Belleville 




Zink. Peter A 




Williams Thomas E 


Zuricker Lorens 


Cable 











HOISTING ENGINEERS HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 



Name. 


Postoffiee. 


Name. 


Postoffiee. 




Belleville 

Collinsville 

Belleville 

Braidwood 

Ridge Prairie .... 
Cuba 


Davis George W^. 


Hanna City 


Allen W^iliiam H 








Davis. William H . 


Streator. 




Davison, .J . G 

Dawson. John . 






Streator. 










Dawson, V. C 


Spring Valley 






Beeby William 


Springfield 

Canton 

Toluca 


DeHass, B. L 


Talluhi 


Bell. George E 


Dietrich, Philip 




Bejivenu'o Charles.. 


Dillon, John 

Doe.R. P 


Auburn 


JBirkley.N.T 


Cuba 

Norris 

Gilchrist 

Yates City 

lies Junction 


Glen Carbon 




Ehel August 




Bowman. George W 


Belleville 




Edwards, George W 

Egerton. J. 






Springfield 

Pottstown 

Coal Citv 










Essex, George M 


Soperville . . 








Campbell James. 


Everett. Charles 


Rutland 




Galva..; 


Fischer Georn-e 




Carrington. Eugene 

Carter Albert J 


Moweaqua 

Pinckneyville — 

Glenburn 

DuQuoin 

LaSalle 

Birkner 

Westville 

Hallidayboro 

Ledford 

Danville 

O'Fallon 


Staunton ... 






Kan giey :::.:.::: 




Gaudy, James W 




Cline. John 




Collins John 


Peoria 


Cook W D 


Glasford Oliver 


Orchard Mines 


Cotton George 


Glenam, Philip 


Williamsville 






Nilwood 










Grattendick. Fred 


Okaw^rille 




LaSalle . 

Marquette. 




Nashville. 


Crocker Edward 


Grey David F 


Springfield 


Cruickshanks Wm A 


Middle Grove 

Sparland 

Diamond 




Streator 


Gumming. Robert H. L.... 




LaSalle 




Belleville 


Daley Thomas 








LaSalle 

New Castle 


Millstadt. 


Davenport. Thomas 


Haek'ett. Owen 


Spaulding 



HOISTING ENGINEERS, CEETIFICATES OF SERVICE. ZOO 

Ce rl ijicf I tes of Se i * /.' ice — Continued. 



Postoffice. 



Name. 



Postoffice. 



Hazier. Charles .Fredonia ! Neil son. J. W Sparta 

HmII. (ieovs:r K iNilwood I Nichulsou. George A Cuba 

Hitn^ioii. Wni lO'Fullon | Noid, John E Galva 

Harms, Heike ! Petersburtr I 

Harris,.!. T Taiuaroa , 

Hayes. Jobu Riverron 0£;den, David iRentcbler. 

Hpaver. F Sandoval Oifdeu, Samuel jMascoutah 

Hickox, Let=' Spriuijfteld Olson, Auy: jKansley .. 

Howe, Charle.-* Sireator Osborne, Ben jam ia tStreator. . 

Ottiuger, William Catlin 



Ichuian, Fiank 
Isadori.', Charlfc 
Isadore, Geora< 



Vi 



Jackson. William Miiiouk 

Jacobs. John P Orcbnnl Mines.. 

Jacobs. William I Murphy sboro. . . . 

Jamison, John ; Petersburg 

Jeffrey, William iGilchrist 

Johnson, Edgar W 'Marissa. 

Jones, '.Teorge W Riverton. 

Jones, 'P. A Muneie. 

Judd, Thomas Cuba. 



Karney, E HalHdayboro. 

Kelley, Martin Tol 

Keuii.er. Christia;; Belleville. 

Kennedy. W. .1 Edwardsville. 

King. .Alexander, Jr Carierville 

King. John 

Kirby, Tbos., Jr iPer 

Klaug. .iohn I Galva 

Klaus, Louis 1 Belleville. 



Langrau. James ! Fairbury 

Larson, Charles L Galva 

Ijathan. William H 'Hallidayboro. 

Lewes, J acob H Pottstown , 



Lewis, William. 
Lippert. Adolph., 
Lloyd. Benjamin. 

Love. William 

Lumdberg, Eric. 



McCalster. Thomas.... 
McD.uiald. William H.. 

NcL.an, .Iohn 

Mc.Millen. W. M 

McWerthy, (t. A 



Mar.'shall. Robert 

Mathaws, (xeorge 

Mattern, Daniel 

Matthews, C 

Matthews, William G. 

Maurer. Edward 

Maxwell. Fred 

Melvin.T. .M 

Milem, John 

Miller, William 

Morrison. Archie 

Mumford. E. A 

Murray, James H 



Wanlock.. 
Kewanee.. 
Rentchler. 

Virden 

Galva 



Muddy Valley... 

Pana 

Pleasant Plains. 

Danville 

Smithboro 



Yates City 

DuQuoin 

Spring Valley. 

Marion 

Bartonville 

Spring Valley. 

Peoria 

Tamaroa 

Sprinir Valley. 

Streator 

Oglesby 

Kewanee 

Galva 



Neal, Ambrose Barclay 

Neil, John H 'Bunker Hill. 



!' ■ ■ ' 1' 'ii: M Equality 

■' ' 1 - iMarseilles 

I' :. . . ..• . -'anies ISoperville 

rill i ill--. \V illiam Hallidayboro. 

Pic ton, Joseph Faruiingtou.. . 

Pii-ton. Tuomas H | 

Piper. Oliver Worden 

Prichard. H. C iLewistown ... 

Prichett, T. M iNiantic 



Quails, Nevel iDub 

Quick, A. T jSati- 



Raber. Louis ICa^eyviile. . 

Radford. James W iCuba 

Radford, \S'. T Bloomingto; 

Rahaur. Michael ; Pawnee 

Redvard.John jO 

Reeise. William M 

Reid, A. B.,Jr 

Rennard, Jame< E 

Reum . Charles H 

Rice. B. F 

Richmond. Edward B 

Rieger. John C , 

Riley, Michael 

Roach, Samuel 

Rogers, George 

Rogers, Henry , 

Rude, Edmond 



Sallade. George A 

Sanson, T. J 

Sawers. Joseph , 

Scbmacher, Charles. 
Schramm, Charles... 

Seeback. Joseph 

Sexton, LaFayette... 

Seymour. A. J 

Sheppard. W. C 

Shurm. Fred 

Smith, George W..., 

Sorrels, D. H 

Sowarby, Miles 

Stoker, Edward 

Strick, William 

Stroud, William 

Struck, Carl , 

Stuart, John 



Tanner, Henry 

Taylor, Benjamin . . 
Taylor, Willard W. 

Teflft, Ernst 

Telfer. John K 

Thome. Martin 



Roanoke 

DuQuoin 

Wrstville 

Sorento 

Harrisburg. .. . 

Winchester 

Pinckueyville 

Westville 

Tamaroa 

Suufield 

Braid wood 

DeSoto 



Chatham 

Cartervilie 

Coal City 

Marissa 

Belleville 

Spring Valley. 

Dawson 

Fredonia 

Marquette 

(Gardner 

Virginia 

Ashland 

Willisville 

Bartonville 

Belleville 

Worden 

Springtield 

Oglesby 



Pinckueyville. 

Bartonville 

Tamaroa 

Girard 

.Morris 

Martinville 



256 



STATISTICS OF LABOE. 



Hoisting Engineers — CerUficaies of Service — Concluded. 



Name. 


Postoffice. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Wallace, Harry G 


East Peoria 

Wenona 

Assumption 

Birkner 




Newcastle 


Wood, Daniel A 


Colfax. 


Waymire. James 

Wertwood Edward 






Wonnes, Joseph 


Birkner. . 




Wormack, Charles A 

Zeigler, John 






Riverton 

Spaulding.. 

Wyoming 








Williams, Stephen P 

Williams, Watson 


lies Junction . 


Barclay 







FIRE BOSSES, CERTIFICATES OF COMPETEN'CY. 



257 



FIRE BOSSES HOLDING (CERTIFICATES OF COMPTENCY. 



NoTK.— This and the following li.'-t include all the fire bosses to whom cer- 
tificates were issued prior to January 1, 18J9. The postoffiee addresses here 
given are those recorded at the time the certifi.cates were issued and in many 
cases are not the present addresses of the certificate holders. 



Andrew, ThoniRS 
Argyle, Josc^pli — 



Barlow. Harry. .. 
Bell. William .... 
Bhiefifcld. Charle.* 
Bowen, Gwilyni.. 
BuUough. James 
Bundy, John 



Campbell, James Assumption . 

Cappin, Aaron Wenona 

Castillo. Henry Pana. 

Chadderton. John Lenz Station. 

Charapley. James | Wenona 

Craine, J. E., Jv [Murphysboro 

Cunningham, David Carlinville ... 



Oglesby .. 
Coal City. 



Lake Creel 
Streator ... 
Coal City. 
Herrins — 

fTirard 

Streator ... 



Damrath, Frederick. 

Davis, William 

Dodge, H. N 

Dooner, F. J 



Edmunds. Morgan. 
English, Thomas .. 



Farrand. Walter. 



<Talbraith, Patrick. 

(ialvin. Martin 

(iloss, Michael 

Goehe, William 

Grahsuek, Emile .. 

Graham, L. A 

Gray, Henry 



Haddow, Thomas. 
Hardnian. J. J. ... 
Harrison. James. . 
Harrison. John ... 
Haun, George. 



Virden 

Streator 

East Peoria 

Westville... 



Mt. OIiv( 

Streator 



Coal City.... 
Assumption. 

Gardner 

Staunton. ... 



Bloomington 
Athens 



Pana 

Auburn. ... 

Athens 

Odin 

Litchfield.. 

Henley. J. H !()din 

Hohleii, Andrew ICoal City.. 

Hopkins, Reese (Litchfield.. 

Howel's. George iStaunton.. 

Hoye, William i Braid wood 

— 17 



James, .Johann 

Jenkins,' T. C 

Jennings, William. 

Jeten, T. P 

Jones. Benjamin J. 

Jones. Morgan 

Johnson, David 

Johnston. Samuel . 
Jordon. Robert 



Grape Creek . 
Murphysboro 

Athens 

Roanoke 

Coffeen 

Litchfield 

Oglesby 



Streator . 



Kloever, Matthew Pana 



Lawson. Thomas ., 
Lettsom. William.. 
Lumaghi, Louis F. 
Lyons, Mark 



McCranor, James . . . 
McCrindle, David. . 
McDonald. William. 
McEwen. Charles... 
McKillop. Donald... 

Maggo, Jacob 

Massie. J. G 

Middleton, J. L 

Miller, Alexander. . . 

3Iorgan. Joseph 

Morris. John H 

Moss, Thomas 

Muentrich, J 

Muir. .\ndrew 

Murphy, John 



Lake Creek. 

Seneca 

Collinsville. 
Lincoln 



Girard 

Oglesby 

Braid wood . . . 
Carbon Hill .. 

Danville 

Belleville 

Salem 

Ridge Prairie 

Streator 

Wenona , 

Staunton 



Springfield. 
Braid wood 



Nichols, Eli W j Dunfermline. 

Nixon, Roliert Streator 

Nordner, C. K Athens 



Opp, Sherman W Sandoval. 



Payne, Emanuel Litchfield — 

Peart, John I Braid wood . 

Phillips. Ben.iamin |Kang!ey 

Pick, Edward Central City 

Prince. Thomas ;Mt. Olive . . . , 

Prudent, Edward iCentralia. .. , 



258 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Fire Bosses — Certificates of Competency— Concluded. 



Name. 


Postofflce. 


Name. 


Postoffice. 


Quinn Bernard 


Bloomington 

Carlinville 

Carbon Hill 

St. Johns 

Streator 

Pana 

Westville 

Farmington 

Pontiac 

Lincoln 


Spires. Alfred 


Braceville 






Collins ville 




Steel, Neal 


Centralia 








Rae Robert . ... 


Stonburner, L. L. 


Sorento. 




Thom, John 










Coal City 






Ritson Hugh 


Vit. Charles 










Litchfield 


Schmid, Conrad . ..... 


Whitcamper, Louis 

Williams, William E 

Wilson Henry 






Odin 

Streator 

Sandoval 

Smithboro 

Streator 




Siddell James 


Streator 




Pana . 


Smith, Henry 


Winterbottom, John 


Sparta 











FIRE BOSSES HOLDING CERTIFICATES OF SERVICE. 




Bagshaw, George W. 
Blakemore, George. 

Borg, Franii 

Boulton, Henry 

Bough, William 

Brooks, Peter 

Brown, John 



Caveny, Edward. 
Pranzen, Mat 



Gray, William. 
Griffin, John .. 



Girard 



Hall, John Herbert... 

Hoesfield, Aaron 

Hornanor, Paul 

Hughes, John.. — ... 
Humphreys, William. 



Minonk 

Oglesby . . . 
Lincoln — 
Decatur ... 
Clark City. 



Jenkins, Rutland 



Kneper, David. 
Kopps, August. 



LaSalle . 



Ross, S. H Girard 



Schmidt. Ernest ; Mt. OUre 

Schultz. John I Diamond 

Shaw, Francis M jHallidayboro. 

Shopman, John Mt. Olive 

Siebenhawer, Wm i LaSalle 

Soluf skie. Hermann Decatur 

Stewart, Samuel Coal City 



Taylor, Samuel 
Thomas, David 



Wilson. Archie Clark City . 

Wilson. John Gardner ... 

Wood, Henry Streator . . . 



O'Pallon. 
Canton... 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES, 



259 



FIRST DISTRICT. 



■Siatement of the Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines of the 
Inspection of Mines, the Amount of Fees Charged and Paid for 
the Year Ending July 1, 1898. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


o >, 

it 


ii 
U 

a" 


.1 


■Oct. 12, 1897 


Acme Coal Co 




145 

179 

98 

12 

6 

582 

591 

570 

FA 

12 

14 

14 

9 

200 

200 

FA 

160 

FA 

6 

8 


$10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Jan 8 1898 






April 11, 1898 
Jan. 3, 1898 
Teb. 11,1898 
Dec. 30,1S'J7 
Mar 7 1S98 








Darrackman, A. M 






Bell. James 

Braeeville Coal Co. No. 4 







Braeeville 


$30 00 


May 21,1898 






June 9,1898 






Sept. 21,1897 


Burrell. Wm 




Oct. 6, 1897 






• Jan. 11,1898 








April 14,1898 








Nov. 9, 1897 
Jan. 21,1898 


Cahill.'James 


Peru 


4666 


Mar. 12,1898 




• • 




April 15,1896 


' ' 






June 10,1898 






Nov. 11,1897 




Deer Park 

Streator 




Sept. 23,1897 


Caswell, John 




■Oct. 8,1897 








C..W. & V. Coal Co. Old Colony Bldg.. 

'[ ;; No. 1 


Chicago 


78 00 


Dec. 27.1897 


Heenanville 

[[ 

Streator ....'..'.'.'.'. 


190 

330 

432 

FA 

250 

250 

400 

496 

250 

270 

FA 

350 

30 

30 

24 

16 

11 

16 

17 

6 

6 

9 

6 


10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
600 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




iFeb. 24. 1898 




May IC 1898 






• • . • . . 




July 9.1897 


" No. 2 




Dec. 24, 1897 




Feb. 23,1898 






May 13-14, '98 


" ' ' ' ' 




Dec. 29, 1897 


'[ '[ R. mine 


Braidwood 

'/, 

Fairbury 




Mar. 9,1898 




May 18. 1898 


.1 • . ■ > 




June 14,1898 


.4 ..•.., 




Oct. 26. 1897 
Jan. 14, 1898 


Cooperative Coal Co 


24 00 


April 13. 189S 
Aug. 6. 1897 
Nov. 15,1807 






Cooperative Coal Co 


30 00 






Feb. 1,1898 




• • 




May 9.189S 


• • • ' 


• • 




Oct. 2G. 1897 


Crichton. Robt 

Diamond Cooperative Coal Co 


Braidwood 




Aug. 10.1897 




Aug. 30.1897 






.Feb. 2. 1898 













*These initials indicate inspection on account of fatal accident. 



260 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



First District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of i Name of Pirii!, Company or Person 
Inspection.! Operating Mine. 



Location of Mine. 



.o P. 

as 

pas 



April 

Nov. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

May 

Jan. 

April 

Jan. 

April 

July 

April 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

May 

Jan. 

April 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Jan 

April 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

May 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Aug. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

May 



27,1898 
20. 1897 

20. 1897 
7, 1897 

19. 1898 
25, 1898 

24. 1897 
8, 1897 

11. 1898 
17, 1898 
19,1898 
20, 1898 
12, 1898 
18, 1898 

6, 1897 
21. 1898 

25. 1897 

2. 1897 

10. 1898 
17, 1898 
10, 1898 

S, 1898' 
3,1897 
26, 1898 

11. 1897 

18. 1898 

9. 1898 
6, 1897 
8, 1897 

20. 1898 
10, 1898 
20, 1897 
8, 1897 

20. 1897 
7, 1897 

19. 1898 

25. 1897 
2. 1897 

10. 1898 
17, 1898 



Diamond Cooperative Coal Co 

Durham, Wm 

Edwards, Thos 



Pontiac . 
Streator 



Espley &Co., J. T . 



Evans, Jr. & Bro., R 

Gardner & Wilmington Coal Co. 



Gilbride, Frank. 



Dec. 1, 
Feb. 4, 
April 26, 
Dec. 2, 
Mar. 28, 
June 10, 
Dec. 4, 
Feb. 5, 
April 29, 
Dec. 7, 
Feb. 18, 
May 6, 
Oct. 15, 
Feb. 6, 
Oct. 26, 
Jan. 14, 
April 13, 
Aug. 18. 
Nov. 23, 
Mar. 24. 
June 21. 
Aug. 13. 
Nov. 10, 
Jan. 22, 
April 16, 
Feb. 26, 
Oct. 6, 
Jan. 11. 
April 14, 
Dec. 9. 



Hakes, Emerson . 



Heather & Co.. Chas. 

Helffrick, John 

Howe Coal Co., Wm 



Kelly & O'Connor. 
Kilburn, Jas 



Kimes Sylvester. 
Kime.s, Oscar 



Laherty & Bro. . Wm 



LaSalle Co. Carbon CoalCo.LaSalle- 
Union Mine 



LaSalle Mine. 



1897 

1898 

189S' 

1897i Rockwell Mil 

1898 

1898 

1897 Jones Mine. 

1898 

1898 

1897 



Love & Sons. 
Maltby. Wm.'.' 



1897; 
1898 
1898 
1897:Marsei]les L. & W, P. Co 

1897 •• 

1898 " 

1898i •• 

1897iMatthesien & Hegler Zinc Co. 

1897 

1898 

1898 

1898 

1897 

1898 

1898 



Nelson & Son 

Nelson & Westerbund 



Oglesby Coal Co. 



Clark City. 



Rutland 



Morris .. 
Ottawa .. 
Streator. 



Braidwood. 
Streator ... 



Jones" Station. 



Wilsman... 
Braidwood 



LaSalle 



Ottawa,. . 
Streator , 



Oglesby 



200l 



$6 00 
6 
6 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 

10 00 

10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

10 00 . 

10 ool. 

6 00 . 
6 GO . 
6 00 . 
6 00 . 
6 00 . 



6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 



10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 

8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 OOi. 
6 001. 

10 ool 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



261 



First District Statement. — Continued. 



Date of Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Inspection, j Operatingr Mine. 



I I 



Location of Sline. 



1 f" 



Feb. 

Mas' 

Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

Nov. 

Nov. 

•Jan. 

April 

Oct. 

Jan. 

J Illy 

A 115?. 
Jan. 
May 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Jan. 
Aug. 
Nov. 
Feb 
May 



1898 
1898 
1897 
1S98! 
1S98| 
1897 1 
1897 
1898! 
18981 
1897 
18981 
1897 i 
1897 1 
1898 
1S98 
1897 
1897 
1897 
1898 
1897 
1897 



Og:lesliy Coal Co Og-l^sLy 

Otter Creek Cosil Vo..... Streator 



Piny Coal Co 

Pontiac Coal Co Poutiac . 



Price & Jones. 
Scbultz. Fred! 



.^itreator . . 
Braeeville 



90 
119i 

11 
73 
70 
130i 



Scott Cbas 

Singer & Sons, H. 
Sowerby Bros 



Kangley 1 *i\ 

Cornell , 6] 



Standard Coal' Co. 



July 


8.1897 


Dec. 


23. 1897 


Feb. 


22. 1898 


May 


5. 1898 


Deo. 


22. 1897 


Feb. 


8. 1898 


April 28,1898 


Dec, 


15, 1897 


Mar. 


18. 1898 


June 


13. 1898- 


Dec. 


17.1897 


Mar. 


16. 1898 


June 


2, 1898 


Nov. 


2, 1897 


Feb. 


10,1898 


May 


17, 1898 


Sept. 


24, 1887 


Oct. 


13, 1897 


April 


12, 1898 


Wept. 


27, 1897 


Oct. 


6. 1897 


Jan. 


11.189S 


Aug. 


25, 18971 


Nov. 


2. 1897 


■Feb. 


10. 1898 


May 


18. 189S 


Oct. 


5. 1897 


,lan. 


15. 1898 


Oct. 


1\1897 


Jan. 


31.1898 




2G. 1898 


April 


22, 1898 


Oct. 


29, 1897 


Aug. 


6, 1897 


Aug. 


28. 1897 


Nov. 


15, 1897 


Feb. 


l,189Ji 


May 


9, 1898 



Star Coal Co., Streator— 
No. 2 Mine. 



Streator 



Kanglej 



Oct. 
Jan. 
Dec. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
May 



27. 1S97 
25. 18 i8 

28. 1897 

10. 1898 
31.1898 
31.1 



No. 2 Mine 

' ' No. 2 mine 

No. 2 mine — 

No. 1 mine ; Spring Hill. 

No. 1 mine — ! \' 

No. 1 mine ! 

No. 3 mine i Carbon Hill. 

No. 3 mine [' 

No. 3 mine [[ 

No. 2 mine [[ 

" No. 2 mine 

No. 2 mine 

Scott& Son.Thos Morris 



Streator Clay Mfg. Co.. 



Swarthout <t Co. R. V 



Telfer & Son, A. W 



Streator. 



Tbomas & Co, Wm [Streator. 

Thorne, D. W '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. \. [[ . 

Treasure. Wm! . '.\'.\ .'.'.'.... i Essex . . . 



U. S. Silica Co W. Ottawa. 

Walton Bros Fairbury . . . 



Wb'tbr'st F. Co.. 936 Rookery, Chicago I 

IClarkeCity 200! 

] " I 2501 

No. 2 Coal City | 406| 

No. 2 " i 536 

" !FA 



Clark City mine. 
Wilmington Big Four Co. 



.$10 001 

10 00! 

8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00' 
6 OOJ 
6 00| 
6 00 
6 001 

6 oo! 

6 00 
6 00 
G 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 



10 00!. 

10 oo; . 

10 00 . 
10 00 . 

6 OOi. 

8 00 . 

8 oo]. 
10 001 . 
10 00 . 

10 oo! ■ 

10 001 . 
10 00| . 
10 OOi . 

6 00 . 

6 00|. 

6 OOi . 

6 00 . 

6 oo!. 

6 OOj. 
6 00. 
6 00 . 

6 oo!. 

6 001. 
6 OOI. 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00! 
6 00 
6 00 

6 oo! 
6 oo! 

6 00| 



No. 2. 

No. 2. 



6 00 



10 00 . 
10 00 . 
10 OOi . 
10 OO' . 
10 00. . 
10 00 . 



$18 00 
12 00 



24 00 

■i2"6o 
"6'66 



262 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



First District, Statement. — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 

a . 

II 


=2 

fi 


i 
§ 


Dec. 14.1897 WilmiTiP-ton noa.l M * Mfp- Ho. No.d 




460 

567 

465 

FA 

90 

75 

93 

60 

30 

8 

9 

13 


$10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 UO 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

$1,438 00 


....$40 00 


Mar 14 1898 


No. 4 

No. 4 

No, 4 

Wilmington Star Mining Co., No. 5... 

Wood.Wm 






May 26. 1898 






June 2 1898 


• ' 






Coal City 




Mar. 11 1898 












Dec. 21 1897 


'• 




Mar. 11, 1898 


Morris .. 




Augr. 24, 1897 




Nov. 3, 1897 






Feb. 11,1898 


' ' 


• ' 






Total 




$468 00 













SECOND DISTRICT. 



July 14,1897 
Nov. 16, 1897 


Alden Coal Co 


Wanlock •••• 


125 
130 
165 
145 
12 
9 
11 
16 
15 
16 
10 
6 


$8 00 
8 00 

10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 


$46 00 






Feb. 10, 1898 








April 25 1898 




' • 




Oct. 27, 1897 


Allison & Jamison 

Ball Coal Co 




6 00 


Oct. 5. 1897 
May 14, 1898 


Bartonville 

Kewanee 


18 Oa 


Oct. 5. 1897 


Bartonville Coal Co. 




Feb. 1. 1898 






May 28,1898 


• • 




Nov. 23,1897 
Jan. 7, 1898 


Bates Bros 




Coal Valley 




Mar. 12,1898 




6 00- 


Nov. 9, 1897 


Camp Creek Coal Co 


Cable 


35 
40 
20 

350 
285 
275 
250 
225 
270 
240 
160 
140 
125 
152 
200 
160 
26 
30 
30 
14 
550 
500 
475 
125 
140 
145 
140 
160 
130 
125 
135 
14 
7 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

10 00 

10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Mar 1 1898 






April 28, 1898 

Dec. 21,1897 
Mar. 29,1898 


• > 


• • 




C, W. & V. Coal Co., Old Colony 
Bldg., Chicago— 
Seatonyille mine 


Seatonville 


30 00 


June 17,1898 






Oct. 19, 1897 
Nov 29 1897 


Chicago & Minonk C. & T. Co 

::;::::: 

Coal Valley Coal Co. No. 1 '.'.'.'.'.'.'. '. 

No.l 

No.l 

No.2 

No.2 

No.2 

Collier Coop. Coal Co 








Feb. 15. 1898 







April 8,1898 
Nov. 9,1897 






Cable 


80 00- 


Mar 1 1898 






April 28. 1898 






Nov 10 1897 


Sherrard. 




Mar 2 1898 








. • 




Oct. 6, 1897 
Jan. 20,1898 


Bartonville 

Kramm Station.. 
Toluca.. 


30 00 


May 18,1898 






Oct. 11,1897 


Cusack, M 

Devlin Coal Co 




Nov. 2 1897 


58 00 


Feb. 22, 1898 






June 1 1898 


' • 






July 19,1897 


Elmwood Coal Co 




40 00 








Jan 17 1898 
















Julv 15 1897 


Empire Coal Co 


Gilchrist 


6S OOi 


Nov. 17,1897 






Feb 9,1898 




• ' 




April 26,1898 








Nov. 26,1897 
April 4,1898 


Fairlie, James 


Carnbridge 


18 OO 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



263 



Second District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
iDspection. 


Nanae of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


S . 


il 


® 

a 

u 

CP. 


Sept. 21. 1897 Folev. W. E 


Mapleton 


20 
30 
15 
8 
12 
20 
20 
32 
20 
22 
20 

i 

70 
48 
35 
15 

1 

6 
35 
45 

20 
16 

9 


$6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
600 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 GO 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Dec. 3. 1897 
Mar. 17.1898 
June 3.189- 
Oct. 14.18^7 
Keb. 4.1898 
May 20.1898 
Oct. 12. 1897 
Feb. 5. 1898 
May 6. 1S!I8 
Nov. 22.1897 
May 11.1898 


• • 


















German Cofip. Coal Co. .... 


Orchard Mines... 
Peoria 












Grant.Peter 














Henry. Philip 










Hfrdipn ( 'nnl Pn No 14 . 






Nov. 24.18971 '• No. 14 












May 25.1898 " No. 14 






Aug. 30.1S97 
Dec. 23, 1897 


No. 12 






No. 12 


• • 




Mar. 26,189s " No. 12 . . 






Oct. 4. 1897:Higliee, James 


Wyoniing 

Orchard Mines!.'. 




Oct. 4,1897 Hig-liee. A. W 




May 17,1898 
Sept. 23,1897 
Dec. 9, 1897 
Oct 27,1897 
Oct. 27,1897 
Mar. 18,1898 
Mar. 5, 1898 
Sept. 29. 1897 
Dec. 24,1897 
Mar. 4, 1898 


Hill & Kreager 






$36 OO 








Hynd. John 


Loding 


l'> OO 




12 00 


Jefford Bros 


Kingston . 






6 00 


Kewanee Coal Co. No. 2 

No. 2 




45 
80 
110 
115 
75 
38 
13 
18 
10 
6 
20 


6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 


94 00 






No. 2 






May 23.1898 " No. 2 






Oct 16 1897 " No 1 . . 






Feb. 17,1898! " No. 1 






Feb. 1, 1898 Kellar & Son 


Bartonville 

Kewanee 




Nov. 22, 1897 Kirlev. Bernard 




May 11,1898 
Sept. 2,i.l897 
Dec. 9. 1897 


• • 




Kramm <t Bro..C. B 


Edwards 








r.nflinp- Rrn« 


Loding 




Mar. 10 1898; Lvle W H 


Kewanee 


6 OO 






28 
80 
35 
500 

200 


6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 




Dec. 27,1897 
April 12.189<- 
Nov. 5.1897 
Feb. 25.1898 
April 12.1898 
Mar. 7. 1898 
















Marqxiette 












Martin Rros 


6 00 


Mar. 1.1898i Mowbray. John 


Atkinson 






6 00 


Auff .30 18981 Miirrt>v J H 


Galva 


18 
20 
15 

56 
10 

90 
95 

100 
30 

'30 
30 
40 
6b 
4.8 
31 
60 
95 

,1 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 

8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 0( 
6 00 
6 00 
800 
6 00 
6 01 
80C 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 


36 00 


Dec. 18. 1897 
Mar. 25.1898 


.". 






• ' 


• ' 




McCaffrev. John 


Blossomburg 

Galva 




Dec. 29, 1897 Mf KanP k-. Walker 


6 00 


Sept. 22,1897 
Dec. 2S. 181)7 
Mar. 18. 18',i8 
Oct. 25. 1897 
April 21.181)8 
May 5. 189>< 


Newsam Bros.. Peoria— 


















IlaiiniiCity 


Hanna City 














Feb. 5 1898 








April 21.1808 










Coal Valley 




Sept. 21,1897 


Reid City Coal_ luid Mining- Co 

Roanoke Mininir Co 




Dec 3 1897 


• • 
















Oct. 20. 1VI7 


Roanoke 


10 00 


June 11.1898 










264 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Second District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


1 
1 

Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine 


Number of men 
employed. 

Inspection fee 
charged. ■ 


1 

a 
o 

HO. 


Oct. 12, 1897 Royster & Zeisrler .. 






22i $6 00 
20| 6 00 
.18, 6 00 

14 6 00 
16 6 00 

7 6 00 
10 6 00 

15 6 00 
38 6 00 
60 8 00 
65 S 00 
60 8 00 
55 8 00 
45 6 00 
45| 6 00 
45i 6 00 
40, 6 00 

9 6 00 




Feb. 12,1898 
May 6, 1898 
Sept. 24,1897 


" 






' ' 








Schmidt it Son. F. P 








Jan. 18.1898 


• ' 




May 2,1898! " 






Oct. 26, 1897 
Oct. 11, 1897 
Dec. 8. 1897 
Oct. 5, 1897 
Feb. 1, 1898 
Mar. 15,1^-98 
June 6, 1898 
Oct. 14, 1897 
Feb. 4.1898 


Silvis & Silvis 

Shaw. Nathan 




Carbon Cliff 

Kramm Station.. 
Sheffield 


S6 00 


Sheffield Mining Co 
Sholl Bros. No. 3.... 




24 00 








No. 3.... 








No. 3.... 








No. 3.... 




' • 




No. 1.... 








No. 1.... 




' ' 




Mar. 15.1898 " No. 1.... 
May 20.1898' " No 1.... 








Oct 7, 1897 


Sholl & Son, Jos 

Smith & Son, Wm . . . 






Mar. 5, 1898 






Oct. 29, 1897 


Suedden & Sou, A 


Orchard Mines... 
Shelfteld 


q 

lii 


■■■e'oo 

6 00 




Feb. 23,1898 




Mar, 22,1898 


Sprague, Clara 


6 00 


Dec. 15, 1897 


Spring Valley Coal C 




Spring- Valley 

Princeville ...'.'.'.'. 
Peoria 


550 
600 
500 
600 
550 
60 
500 
450 
500 

■"40 
12 
55 
65 
75 
80 
140 
160 
155 
250 
300 
300 


io 66 

10 00 
10 00 
1 10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

6-66 

6 00 

8 00, 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 

10 00; 

10 00 
10 00 
10 OOj 




Mar. 9, 1898 


No. 1. . 




May 13,1898 


No. 1 




June 24,1898 


No. 1. 




Mar. 8, 1898 


No.2 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 3 




June 25,1898 
Dec. 16, 1897 




Mar. 23,1898 




June 23,1898 


No. 3 




Mar. 10,1898 
Oct. 22, 1897 


Taylor, Robt 

Vicary Bros 




6 00 


May 2, 1898 




Nov. 17.1897 


Wantling & Son, I 


Pottstowu 




Jan. 10,1898 




April 13,1898 







July 12,1897 






Dec. 13,1897 


WenonaCoal Co 


60 00 


Feb. 15, 1898 






Mar. 31,1898 


' ■ 


Ladd...' .■.".■.'.■.' .■.'.'■.■ 




Dec. 2,1807 


Whitehreast Vup] Co. 


B 

rson 




Mar. 22,189S! 




June 18,18981 




Mar. 14, 18981 Wilkinson & Sumrae 


Coal Valley 


18 00 


Dec. 1,1897| Wilkinson & Tonkin 
Dec. 7, 18971 Williamson. Z. F. . . . 


Sheffield 


20 
18 
8 
8 
40 
45 
45 


6 66 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00[ 


6 00 


Sept. 24,1897 
Jan. 18,1898 


Wolland & Bro., E.. 


Bartonville 


18 00 


Oct. 7, 1897 


Wolschlag's Coop. Co 
Total.. 


alCo 




Jan. 20,1898 






May 18,1898 




• ' 














SI. 174 Oo! 


$816 00 















THIRD DISTRICT. 



July 23,1897 


Anderson, N 




12 

10: 
61; 

70; 

75 i 
65 
8: 
8, 

o' 

6: 


86 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Nov 23. 1897 




.... 


July 14,1897 


Astoria Coal M_ /Jo 


Astoris 




Oct. 14.1897 


I • 




Jan. 21.1898 








April 13,1898 
Nov. 23,1897 


r^angston Bros 


Watao-a . 




Mar. 8, 1898 








Nov. 3,1897 
Feb. 8. 1898 


Bartlett & Bradley 


Cuba 





STATEMENT OF INSI'ECTION FEES. 

Third Dislricf, Statement — Continued. 



265. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operatiusr Mi!ie. 


Location of Mine. 


- 
1^ 


1 
11 

«J3 


Inspection fee 
paid. 


Mar. 18.1898 
Sept. 8.1897 


Bath, Jacob 

Bath, Abraham 

Berry, John 


Cuba 






S6 00 


St David 






6 00 




I 

(. 

6 

8 


8 
8 
6 

22 
21 
24 
23 
13 
35 
47 
25 

g 

70 
10 
7 
10 
16 
18 
24 
10 
35 
55 
60 
60 
6 
6 
7 
8 
8 
6 


SC 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
(i 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 










Feb -i l^9^ 










Bowman Bros 

Bi'own & E'liuger . 


Vates City 

Klmwood 

Ro.seville 




Dec. 7 1897 




Sept. 2, 1897 


Bryuer Bros 






Feb. 11) 1898 








Sept. L\ 1S97 


Caldwell. Thos 


\von 








Feb. 4 1898 








July 15, 1897 


Canton Coal Co 


Canton 








Jjin 8 1898 








April 25, 1898 
July 7,1897 








Canton Union Coal Co 






Oct 5 1897 

















April 20, 1898 




St. DaviVi; :;;;::;; 


;::;. 


(Jarbon Coal Co 




Oct. 1. 1897 




Jan. 3.1898 
April 14.1898 
Sept. 21,1897 
Nov. 24 1897 


'• 












Cliftonl, Geo 


Oneida 






Sept. 10.1897 
Nov. 4, 1897 


Cline & Shaw 


Fiatt 






Feb. 9, 1898 










1 i 






July 28,1897 
Oct. 19, 1897 


Colchester C'. A: M. Co 


Colchester 










April 28. 1898 
Sept. 3,1897 
Nov. 9.1897 






Cook & Gilmor 








Feb. 15 1898 










Corsolius. (4. W 

Cuurtney, W C 

Cuiiiii.iiiu-. W. M 

jlou^l.rrty. Kobt 

Dudley. Z. ]• 


Galesbur^ 

Aug-ust-' 

Rushville 




Jan. -0 1S9S 




Nov. 17. lyiT 




Oct. l;::. 1V17 


6 00 


July 22, 1S97 


Kno.xville 

Colchester 

Yates City;;;;;;:: 

Soperville 

Farminqrton 

'• ;;;;;; 
;;;;;; 


6 

'i 

6 
60 
51 
65 
50 

5 

25 
.^5 
36 
13 
40 
96 
65 
68 
30 
29 
15 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
00 
00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 on 
6 00 






Feb. 25, 1898 


' • 




May 23, 1898 






Oct. 19,1897 
April 28,1898 
Jan 19 lS9f> 


Eg-erton Coal Co 




E ire r ton Bros 




Julv 29.1S97 


Eserton .M iner's Coop. C. Co 

Endres, Geo 




Au^'. 31,1897 




Dec G 1897 




July 22,1897 


Essex, Geo. W 




Oct. 12,1897 




Fell 23 1S98 


• • 










Sept. 7,1897 


Farminjrton Coal Co 




Oct. 11, 1897 




Fel>- 1,1898 






April 27.1898 
Oct 7, 1897 






Findley Coal & Coke Co 




Jan. 10. tS98 




April 2. 1S!IS 
Sept. 10.1897 


• ' 




Gould. R. E 

Jacobson &: Son, John 

Jarvis, T. H 

•lordan iV: Son. Win 

Kerr, W. M 


6 00 


Nov. 23. 1S97 


Wataffa 


6 

8 


6 00 
6 00 




Jlav 13, 18!),S 


Astoria 






.>^t David 


6 00 


Mar. 4, 1898 


Rushville 


8 
6 
12 
10 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




June 14, 189.S 




Oct 22 1897 


I-athrop Bros 


Knoxville 




Feb. 25.1898 





266 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 

Third District, Statement— Conthiued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


II 
1^ 


a 
.2-3 

1" 


1 
a 
.2 


.Tuly 13,1897 


Laws, J. M 


Cuba 


26 
30 
30 
30 

5 

7 
6 
70 
60 
62 
25 
25 
30 
20 

14 
20 
30 
6 
11 
8 
6 
9 
6 
5 
12 
9 


$6 00 




Nov. 3,1897 




6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Feb. 8, 1898 








May 27,1898 








Sept. 20,1897 


Lowery &_Kiunoman 


Lewiston 




Nov. 12,1897 






Feb. 9. 1898 




• ' 




.lune 13,1898 




• • 




Oct. 11.1897 


Maplewood Coal Co 


Farmington 

" 
Breeds 




Feb. 22, 1898 






April 12, 1898 


' ' 




Sept. 8, 1897 


Meehan,_ Patrick 




Oct. 26, 1897 






Jan. 14,1898 








April 11,1898 








Aug. 10.1897 


MeredithBros 






Oct. 21,1897 






Jan. 20,1898 








April 29.1898 


• ' 






Sept. 3.1897 


Murphy & Redmond 


Monmouth 




Nov. 8, 1897 




Feb. 14, 1898 






Sept. 3.1897 


McCartney, C F 




Nov. 9, 1897 






Feb. 15.1898 








Sept. 1.1897 


McGovern, Jas 


Oneida 




Nov. 24,1897 






Mar. 9, 1898 




• • 




Mar. 9. 1898 


McMullen, Wm 

Nappin, David 




S6 00 


Jan. 10, 1898 


Farmington 

Cuba 


8 
9 
25 
20 
10 
8 
18 
9 
9 
7 
8 

13 
12 
14 
6 
60 
52 
55 
52 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 




April 12, 1898 




July 13,1897 


Nicholson & Son. Wm 

Norris Coal Co 




Aug-. 30,1897 


Morris 




Oct. 5,1897 


ParceIl,__Thos 


Canton . 




Jan. 22,1898 






May 3. 1898 








Aug. 5. 1897 


Picton, Emmons & Co 


Farmington 




Aug. 9.1897 


Porter, Wm 




Oct. 20, 1897 






Feb. 3, 1898 


• • 






Jan. 20,1898 


Ray.M.F 


Augusta 




July 23,1897 


Sopei-ville 

Colchester!!!!!!!! 




Oct. 13, 1897 






Feb. 23, 189S 






May 24, 1898 






July 28,1897 


Rippetoe & Kundle 




Oct. 19, 1897 




Jan. 19,1898 






April 28,1898 






Mar. 10.1898 


Roddis & Son. R 

Ross & Woodward 


24 OO 


Sept. 1,1897 


Soperville 

Monmouth 

Alexis 


10 
14 

18 
8 
8 
8 
5 
6 
8 
3 

8 
6 

6 
60 

82 
72 
57 
15 
10 

41 


6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Oct. 12,1897 




Feb. 23,1898 






May 24. 1898 






Sept. 3. 1897 


Selkirk, John 




Nov. 8. 1897 




Sept. 3. 1897 


Simcox. John 




Nov. 9. 1897 






Feb. 15, 1898 








July 29,1897 


Sherbin.D B 


Colchester 




Feb. 2, 1898 




Nov. 19,1897 


Sollenberger & Tygret 

Stanriard & Ruhl 

Stickler.H 

Sunday Creek Coal Co 




Nov. 22,1897 


Avon 




Aug. 4,1897 


Canton 




July 16,1897 


Middle Grove .... 
Wataga 




Oct. 7,1897 






Jan. 11,1898 


. . , > 




April 21,1898 






Nov. 23,1897 


Taylor Bros 




Mar. 8, 1898 






Nov. 3, 1897 


Taylor & Conden 


Cuba 




Feb. 8.1898 







STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



267 



Third District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


11 

;5* 


1 

a 

1 


1 

a 
_o 






30 
4 

7 

"9 
10 
15 
10 
55 
6 
7 
7 

9 
9 
9 
10 
10 
232 

m 

258 
95 
125 
138 
1110 
6 
- 40 


$6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 GO 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 

$1,124 00 




July 27, 1897 Thixton <«• Kerr . . 






Nov. 17,1897 

Oct. 2,lS97Thomp 








on & Esele 












Nov. 12,1897 
.Ian. 15,1898 
April 5,1898] 
Sept. 7, 1897!Tyson, 




•• 






" 










T ^.\ 


Farmington 




Mar. 3, i898;Tygret, ft. W 




Oct. 27, 1897 Wagles 
Mar. 3,1898 


Bros. & Co 












Frank . 






Sept. 1,1897 We&teen. Albert 


Galesbnrg 

Colchester!!!!;!;; 
Dunfermline 

St. David...;;;;;; 




Oct. 13,1897 

Feb. 24,1898 

Feb. 2.1898 Whalen 

Oct. 20. 1897! Whalen 


• • 









.Peter 

Bros 










Oct. 25,18971 


: .■: ^::::::::::::::: 

D.'.V.'.'.'.V.'.'.'...'. 
D 




.Tan. 31. 1898 ! 




April 8,1898! 




July 9.1897 




Oct. 1,1897 
Jan. 7, 1898 
April 7,18it8l 




;;;;;;;;;; 


Nov. 27, 1897 Whitniore. Davifl 




Jan. 13,1898 


Williams .T T 


Norris 




Totj 


il 






$60 00 













FOURTH DISTRICT, 



Oct 


12,1897 
30, 1897 

22. 1897 
5. 1898 

16. 1898 
26, 1897 
12. 1897 

2, 1898 
12, 1897 
2, 1898 
9, 189S 
2, 1897 

15. 1897 
7, 1897 

18. 1898 
12, 1898 
13, 1898 
18, 1898 
11,1898 

8. 1897 

12. 1897 
23.1897 
28, 1S97 

3. 1898 
9. 1897 
2. 1897 

14. 1898 
2. 189S 

25, 1897 
1,1898 

20. 1897 
11.1898 

6, 1897 
13. is:)7 
17. lS9h 

21. 1898 




East Peoria 

Athens 


125 
120 

80 

J 

50 
10 
13 
14 
56 

S 

130 
18 
40 
23 
14 
14 
13 
33 
125 
112 
91 
70 

116 
90 
70 
45 
31 
35 

24 


$6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

5 00 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 

10 00 
G 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 

10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
800 

10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




.July 
Oct. 


Athens Coal Co 




Fei. 






June 






Oct 


.Axford, T 

Butler f; Co.. Ph 


Petersburg 

East Peoria 

pekin ;;;;;; 




ocr 




M<ir 




Oct 


Blake.A.C 




Mar 




June 


' ' 




Aug. 


Bohlander Bros 




Oct. 




Oct. 
Mar. 


Brookside Coal Co.. No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 


Grape Creek 

; 

;: 


§12 00 


Alay 




June 




Mar. 


No 2 






No. 2 




Dec. 


Bunting Bros 






Cass Co. Coal Co 




Aug. 






Oct. 





Ashland 




Feb, 




July 


Catlin Coal Co 






Dec. 






INfar 






May 








Oct 


Chicago <fc K. C. Coal Co 


Petersburg 

Linc(dn 




Feb 




Dec 


Citizen's poal Co 




Alnv 






Colfax C.k yi.Qo 


Colfax 




Nov 




Feb 








June 









268 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Fourth District. Statement — Continued. 



Date of 

Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating- Mine. 


Location of Mine 


O <L 
■^ >■ 

S !- 


°'6 

11 


1 

o 


Nov. 4, 1897 


Consolidated Coal Co. , St. Louis, Mo.— 
;; No._4mine 

[' Fairmountmine 


Danville 


35 
60 
65 

85 
98 

1 

10 
8 
160 
180 
120 
118 
149 
135 

90 
104 

50 

9 

9 

9 

30 

33 

22 

12 

90 

130 

130 

120 

160 

8 

23 
61 
65 
25 
53 
58 
110 
15 
10 


$6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 

5 00 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Feb. 11,1898 






Mar. 19,1898 


' ' 




Feb. 22,1898 


Fairmount 

Chenoa 




May 4. 1898 




May 19,1898 




Aug. 5. 1897 


Davis Coal Co 




Mar. 7, 1898 








■June 20,1898 






Sept. 10.1897 


Decatur Coal Co, , No. 2 

No. 2 .. . 






Dec. 28,1897 






Mar. 31,1898 


No. 2 






Sept. 11,1897 


No. 1 

No. 1 

• ' ' No. 1 

[[ ■ Niantic 






Dec. 23,1897 






Mar. 31,1898 






Sept. 15.1897 






Oct. 29,1897 






May 9, 1898 




' ' 




Oct. 26,1897 




Petersburg 

East Peoria'.!"!. 




Jan. 31, 1898 






Oct. 13,1897 


Doering & Co.. W. F 




Mar. 3, 1898 




Oct. 13,1897 


East Peoria C. Co 




Mar. 3, 1898 




Mar. 25,1898 






June 9, 1898 






Nov. 16,1897 


Economy Coal Co 




Feb. 9, 1898 






Mar. 11,1898 








April 18, 1898 




' • 




June 3, 1898 


Ellsworth.J. W 

Francis Bros 

Glenburn Coal Co 

Grant & Sons, L 

Grant Bros 

Greenview Coal Co 






Dec. 3,1897 


Catlin. 


24 00 


Nov. 23,1897 




48 00 


Oct. 15,1897 


Pekin.. 




Aug. 2, 1897 






Oct. 27,1897 


Greenview 

Westville !' 




Feb. 2. 189S 




Oct. 5, 1897 


Himrod poal Co 




Dec. 13, 1897 






Dec. 30, 1897 








May 28, 1898 








May 10. 1898 


Illinois Fuel Co 

Jenkins, D. A 

Jones, Arthur 


Bloomington 




Dec. 1,1897 




Sept. 3, 1897 


Catlin 


6 00 


Oct. 9,1897 


Grape Creek 

Westville 


30 
254 
250 
340 
341 

i 

150 
250 
240 
105 

Si 

35 

35: 

40! 

25 

'1 

14 
26 
40 
35 

395 
300 
38 


6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
K) 00 
6 00 




July 8, 1897 


Kellyville Coal Co., No. 2 




Nov. 19,1897 


No. 2 






Feb. 24,1898 


No. 2 






June 6,1898 


No. 2 ... 


' ' 




Nov. 1, 1897 


No. 1 


> ' 




Feb. 23, 1898 


No. 1 

N0.-3 

No. 3 


• ' 




Nov. 5,1897 






Mar. 21,1898 






May 26, 1898 


No. 3 






Dec. 21,1897 


Lincoln Coal Co 






Mar. 30,1898 






June 23.1898 








Mar. 4, 1898 


Little & Co., E 


Peoria 




Mar. 25,1898 




April 27, 1898 




' ' 




Oct. 14, 1897 


Little Coal & Com. Co 

Lloyd. J. E 






Dec. 7, 1897 






Mar. 17,1898 






May 23,1898 


' ' 






June 10.1898 


Millard Bros 

Muncie^Coal Co 


E. Peoria.. 




Sept. 23.1897 






Oct. 8. 1897 






April 21,1898 


' ' 


• • 




Nov. 12.1897 


McLean County Coal Co 


Bloomington 

Grape Creek 1 




Feb. 18, 1898 




■Oct. 5, 1897 


O'Connell, John 





STATEMENT OF IXSPEOTION FEES 



269 



Fourth District, Statement.— Coiiclwded. 



Date of 
iction. 



Nov. 
Mar. 
May 

Oct. 

Nov. 

May 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Mar. 

April 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Feb. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

July 

Oct. 

Feb. 

June 

July 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

May 

June 



Name of Firm, Company or Person 
< )perating Mine. 



Location of Mine. 



.1897 O'Connell. John. 
. 1898 
, 1898 
1897 Pawnee Coal Co. 



Grape Creek 47 

44! 

' ' _ ^ 59j 

Danville '.'. 250 



18971 Rusche Bros 

1898 • • 

1897, Sloan. E.C 

1898: •• 

1S9S, •• 

1S98! " 

1S9N South Mountain Coal C< 

1897 Tallula Coal Co 

I897! •• 

1898: ' • 

,1897 
,1898 



E. Peori 
Pekin.. 



1897 



Union Coal <fc Mining: Co. 
Wabash Coal Co '. 



1898 
1897jWestvilleCoalCo. 

1897 
1897 1 
189SI 

1,S9)S| 
1898] 



Petersburg,. 
Talula 



Mt. Pulaski 



'Westville.. 



10 

38 

321 

331 

33 

20 

80 

84 

125 

115 

225 

221 1 

220 i 

FA| 

2401 

2201 

FA| 






$6 00 

6 00 

8 00 

10 00 

10 00 

10 00 

6 00 

6 00 

6 00! 

6 00 

6 00: 

6 00 

6 00 

6 00 $48 00 

6 00 



6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 O'J 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 



FIFTH DISTRICT. 



Oct. 

Mar. 

June 

Oct. 

Jan. 

June 

Nov. 

Feb. 

May 

Nov. 

Mar 

Nov. 

Feb. 

June 

Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

Oct. 

Jan. 

June 

Oct. 

Mar. 

May 

July 

Nov. 

Jan. 

May 

Feb. 

April 

Nov, 

Jan. 

April 

Oct. 



181 
1.S9S 
, 189S 
1897 
1898 
189! 
189' 
189S 
1898 
1897 
1898 
1897 
1898 
1898 
189 
1898 
1898 
1897 
1898 
189S 



Assumption C. & M. Co. 
Auburn Coal Co 



Barclay Coal Co '.'.'.'.'.'.'. Springfield 



Assumption | 1541 

I 140! 



Bates & Co., w.H.'.'.'.'.';";;;;;;;;;;.;; iwinchesier. 

Black Diamon<rc."cC-'TVCo!.*!!!;!;;;."; illes Junctic 



Springfiel 



Capital Coal Co. No. 1.. 

No. 1.. 

No. 1 

No. 2 

N... 2 

No. 2 

1897|Cantrall Coop. Coal Co Cantrall .. 

1898[ • ' I . • 

i898| " .■; I •• 

1S97 Carlinville C'oal Co ;Carlin\ 

ISIW 
1S9S 
1898 
1898 
1897 
1898 
1898 
1897 



Chatham Coal Co. 



Chicago- V^irden Coal Co. No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 2 



Chatham.. 
Virden 



351 
451 
901 
120, 
70 j 

901 

70; 

80 
33 
120 
118 
102 
8 
75 
115 
CO 
40 
50 



SIO 00 
10 00 
6 00 
(i 00 
6 001 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
(J 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 OOl 
6 00 
6 00 
8 001 
8 00 
8 OOl 
6 00: 

10 eoi 
10 00 1 
10 00 

6 00 
8 60 
10 00 
00 
6 00 
6 OOl 
10 00 
10 OOl 
10 00 
10 001 



:270 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Fifth District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


g 

g. . 

if 


<4-l 

o,ss 


.1 
II 


Jan. 27.1898 


Chicago-VirdenCoalCo. No. 2 

Citizens' Coal Co. A '. . ...V.'.'..'. 

a!.!!!!!..'!!!!!..!!! 
B 


Auburn 


165 
120 
146 
220 
175 
22 
78 
70 
60 
124 
150 
200 
180 

196 
200 
200 
175 
221 
240 
250 
270 
150 
125 

75 
110 
110 

14 
102 

85 


$10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 GO 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

8 00 
10 00 
10 00 

6 00 
10 00 

8 00 










Nov. 11.1897 


Springfleld 

Bisseii.... :::::::: 




Feb. 14, 1898 




May 16,1898 




Mar. 23,1898 




De-. 2.1897 




Feb 24 1898 


Coffeen C 










• • 






Sept. 20 1897 


oal & Copper Co 


Coffeen . 




Nov. 16,1897 






Feb. 15. 1898 


' ' 


' • 




May 3, 1898 








Cosol 
;Dec. 20,18971 


Coal Co., St. Louis. Mo.- 

No.lOMine 

No. 10 •• 

No. 10 '• 

No. 8 " 

No. 8 " 

No. 8 " 

No. 6 " 

No. 6 " 

No. 7 " 

No. 7 " 

; Gillespie Mine 

Bunker Hill Mine:: 
; Hornsby Mine 


Mt, Olive 

Staunton 




Mar. 16,1898i 
May 5,1898 






Dec. 20.18971 




Mar. 16,1898 




May 5. 1898 






Mar. 15 1898 




June 20,1898 


Gillespie. :::::::: 
Bunker Hiii:::::: 

Hornsby 




Mar. 15,1898 




June 21,1898 




Dec. 23,1897 






Feb. 16, 1898 




April 20, 1898 




Dec. 29,1897 




Feb. 17, 1898 




April 25, 1898 






Sept. 6, 1897 


Ellsworth & Co. J. W 

Edinbur"' Pnnn C C,n 


Virden 


$38 00 


Nov. 5 1897 


Edinburg 


6 
30 
IS 
100 
120 
130 
50 
165 
90 
90 
130 
25 
9 
10 
50 
48 
50 
40 
31 
40 
48 


6 66 

IZ 

8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 






Girard C< 

Green Ri 
Hebensti 


. . 






April 3,1898 








July 6, 1897 


)alCo 


Girard 




(Jet. 8, 1897 




Jan. 11, 1898 








May 31, 1898 








Oct. 25, 1897 






34 00 


Dec. 27,1897 


Pit Rvnnn Nn 7 


Staunton. 




Oct. 5, 1897 


Hillsboro Cnal Co 






Feb. 18.1898 


Horse Cr 
Litchflelc 

Litchfield 
LuekinsT, 


' ' 






April 16 1898 








Sept. 23,1897 


eekCoal Co 






Jan. 26 1898 






July 7, 1897 


M.&P.Co 


Litchfield 




Oct. 7, 1897 






Jan. 15,1898 








April 4, 1898 








July 22,1897 


M. _& M. Co 








' ' 




Jan. 15,1898 








Sept. 20,1897 


C. Ti. 


Fosterburg 


6 00 


Nov. 1, 1897 


Madison Coal Co. No. 5 

No. 5 

No. 5 

Micheals, Chas 

Montgomevv f 'nal Co 


Mt Olive 


220 
200 
220 


10 00 
10 00 
10 00 




Jan. 12,1898 






May 7, 1898 


' ' 




Sept. 23,1897 




6 00 


Dec. 8. 1897 


Witt 


15 
24 

30 
128 
111 
125 

40 
9 
6 

48 

43 
150 
140 
175 
150 
138 


6 66 

6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 


12 00 


Mar 10 1898 


Moweaqu 


• ' 






June 16, 1898 


• > 


> 1 




Nov. 3, 1897 
Mar. 8,1898 


aC.^M.Mfg.Co 


Moweaqua 

Chatham 


40 00 


June 15, 1898 


' ' 




Nov 19 1897 


fe «Or,COTl = OT- 




July 21,' 1897 
Sept. 10,1897 
Nov. 15,1897 


Neil&Co..Wm ! 

NilWOOd Onrhnn P On 


Bunker Hill 

Nilwood 






O'Gara, I 
Pana Coa 








Jan. 19 1898 


' ' 


• ' 




Jan. 20,1898 


Qng & Co 


Green Ridge 

Pana 




May 31.1898 




July 14 1897 


ICo 










Feb. 1.1898 









STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



271 



Fifth District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
(Jperating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 

il 
1^ 


n 

1" 


a 

a 
o 

u 

S 0. 


July 15.1897 


Penwellp. M. Co 




205 
120 
230 
10 
16 
160 
221 
10 
250 


$10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 


$60 00 






-Jan 29 1S98 




' ' 














Richard.son. John 

Riverton Coal t'o.. No. 2 

No "^ 


Shelby ville 

Riverton 




Oct ''9 1897 




Ti'f>h 1'f IHQH 






Mar. 3, 1898 
June 3 189s 


No. 1 

Vr. 1 










Feb. 12! 1898; Rutledge, Walton 

Nov 12 1897 ■'^aif-'inion Co-a] On. 




6 00 


Springfield 

Spaulding 

Springfield.'.!; ;;■.'. 
Kidgely 


120 
121 
132 
125 
121 
110 
131 
126 
90 
85 
85 
50 

no 

120 
80 
70 
85 
78 
14 
26 

18 
152 
140 
124 
120 

90 

150 
242 
250 
13 
130 
142 
132 
90 
115 
80 
201 
125 
90 
65 
85 
75 
85 
90 
75 
92 
120 
95 


io 66 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 uO 
10 00 
8 00 
10 OU 
10 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 

8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
8 00 




Jan. 25'. 1898 
May 10,1898 
Dec. 11,897 
Mar. 1, 1898 
May 18.1898 
Oct. 27.1897 
Feb. 2, 1898 
April 12,1898 
Oct. 29,1897 
Feb. 4,1898 
April 13, 1898 
Oct. 29,1897 
Feb. 3. 1898 
April :i8.1898 






• ' 




Spauldinsr Coal Co 






• ' 




Springfield C. M. & T. Co 










SpriugfieldCoop. C. Co 














Springfield Iron Co 












' • 




Springfield .Junction C. Co 


lies Junction 

Pleasant Plains.. 

Pana 




Feb. 5 1898 




June 1 1898 






July 27! 1897 
Dec 3 1897 








.... 


Mar ^2 1898 








• . 




Nov 4 1897 


Springside Coal Co 




Jan '^1 1898 






Oct 13,1897 


Starne's ( 'oal M. Co 


Springfield 

Shelby ville. '.'.'.'.'.'. 
TaylorviUe 

Golden Eagle ".;;; 
Virden 




Jan ''4 1898 




June 2,1898 






Nov. 4, 1897 


Stretch, B. F 

TaylorviUe Coal Co 




Oct. 11,1897 
Jan. 17,1898 


50 00 


June 6.1898 


• ' 




Oct. 6,1897 


Thomas Pressed Brick Co 




Nov. 9, 1897 




Jan. 13,1898 
April 8,1898 
Oct. 28,1897 
Feb. 11,1898 
May 20,1898 










' • 




Wabash Coal Co 






















Nov 17 1897 


West End Coal Co 


Springfield 

Hornsby 










• ' 




July 9.1897 
Dec. 28.1898 
Nov. 18.1897 
Feb. 10.1898 
May 9, 1898 
Nov 10 1897 


Williams, W.W 




Williamsville Coal Co 


Williamsville .... 
Springfield 










Woodside CoalCo.. 




Jan ''1 1898 






April 29,1898 






Total 






$1,350 00 


$314 00 













272 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



SIXTH DISTRICT. 



Date of 
Inspeclion. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


1 

if 




9 




_ 


30 
30 
10 
43 
26 
140 
160 
150 
165 
40 
145 
164 
150 
130 


$6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 




Feb. 10. 1898 
May 9,1898 
■lune 11 1898 








■ :::::::::;:::::::: 






Rollo-iTillt. 371^1 n'PnllnTl Onu) C'n 


Belleville 










Aug. 18.1897 


Breese Coal Co 


Breese . . 








Jan '^0 1898 




• ' 




April 15,1898 




Pittsburg Station 
Centralia. 




Briar Hill Coal Co 

Centralia M_._& Mfg. Co 




July 28.1897 


$52 oa 






Jan 12 1898 




' ' 




April 9,1898 
Mar '^'S 1898 








Chalingworth. Wm 

Consolidated Coal Co., Laclede Bldg.. 
St. Loviis. Mo.— 
Abbey No. 3 mine 

No 3 " 




Fosterburg 


6 00' 


Jan. 10,1898 
June 27,1898 
Dec. 13,1897 
Jan 17 1898 


Collinsville 

Ridge Prairie".!!! 


110 
120 
35 
23 
13 
30 
55 
60 
20 
55 
35 
40 
50 
20 
40 

85 
90 
27 
33 
23 
18 
22 

24 

8 
17 
22 
30 

52 
140 
150 
150 
8ti 
CO 
58 
31 
40 
24 
26 
35 
60 
75 
76 


10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 

6 oa 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 






" No 4 " 




No 4 " 










Feb 1' 1898 






Oct. 26, 1897 
Jan. 20,1898 












> > 






Jan. 18,1898 
Dec. 22,1897 
Feb. 9, 1898 
May 18.1898 


Brookside mine 

Gartside No. 4 mine 

No 4 " 






Belleville 








No 4 '■ 












Mar. 29,1898 
June 10,1898 
Jan. 17,1898 
May 10,1898 
Nov. 4, 1897 
Feb. 10.1898 
May 9.1898 












Heintz Bluff mine 


Collinsville 






Marissa mine 










• • 






Ridge Prairie — 
Belleville 




Feb. 4, 1898 
Dec. 24,1897 






Pittsburg mine 
























Dee "^1 1897 


Rose Hill mine 


• ' 





Mar. 29.1S98 
Dec. 24,1897 
Feb. 21,1898 
May 2,1898 
Sept. 25.1897 
Nov. 9, 1897 
Jan. 15,1898 
May 6, 1898 
Jan. 18,1898 










' • 
















Trenton mine 


Trenton 










• ' 










Troy mine 










Jan. 27,1898 
April 18, 1898 
Dec. 30,1897 
Mar. 8.1898 
Nov. 11,1897 
Dec. 14,1897 

June 9,' 1898 
Sept. 15.1897 
De.-. 7.1897 
Feb, 16,1898 
May 24,1898 
Oct. 14. 1897 
Mar. 10.1898 
June 20.1898 


White Oak mine 










Worden No. 12 


Worden 






Crown Coal and Tow Co. No. 2 

No.4 

No.4 

No.4 

Deitrick, John 

DonkBros 


Belleville 












• • 




Freeburg . 


6 00> 




30 

40 
78 
30 
42 
24 


6 66 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
00 
6 00 










• • 























STATEMENT OF INSrECTION FEES. 

Sixth District, Statement — Continued. 



27;^ 



Date of 
Inspection. 



Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 




Jxily 

Oct. 

Mar. 

June 

Oct. 

Jan 

April 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

April 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Nov. 

Jan. 

April 

Feb. 

Oct. 

May 

Oct. 

Mar. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

July 

July 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Mar. 

June 

Nov. 

April 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan, 

April 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

July 

Dec. 

Mar. 

July 

Mar. 



.1897 

,189S 
.1898 
.1897 
, 1S98 
, 1898 
, 1S97 
, 1.S97 
, 1898 
. 1898 
, 1897 
,1897 
.1898 
.1897 



,1897 
.1897 

1898 



Freeburg: Mining Co Freeburg. 



Glendale C. & M. Co Belleville. 



Guest & Co.. Jos.. 
Highland Coal Co. 



Hippard. Geo 

Humboldt Coal Co . 
Johnson Coal Co.. 



Johnson M. Co 

Kinmundy Coal Co 



Kolb Coal Co Mascoutah. 

Krantz, Jacob Belleville . . 

Lebanon Coal & Mch. Co Lebanon... 



Liskerraan. Phillip CaseyviUs.. 

Lumaghi Coal Co Collinsville. 



Edwardsville 
Glen Carbon. 



Madison Coal Co., No. 3 

No. 3 

No. 4 

No. 4 

No. 2 

No. 2 

Massie Coal Co., No. 1 Bellevilk 

No. 1 • 

No. 2 

No. 2 

MillstadtC. & M. Co iMillstadt 



Moser Coal Co. 



Rentchler 



Mo. & 111. Coal Co., Rialto Bldg., St. 
Louis ]Mo. — 
Rentchler mine Rentchle 



Freeburg mine Freeliurg 45 

•• .SI 

•• ,55 

Wilderraan mine Wilderman ' 35 



Dec. 21.1897! 
Mar. 1C.1H98I 
May 19,1898 
Dec. 23.1S97| 
Mar. 10.18981 
June 8,1898 
Dec, 23, lS97i 

Feb. 21.1.^98 •• 

June 8.1898, '" 

Mar. 8.1898 Mt. Olive & Staunton C. Co Staunton. 

June 28,1898 " •' 

Oct. 12,1897i.Muren Coal Co Belleville 

Mar. 15,1898j '• 

June 9.1898 " 

Sept. 20.1S97lOak Hill C. & M. Co 1 

Oct. <;.1897! '• I 

Feb. 9,1898 " 

May 24,18981 " ' 



6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

10 00 
8 00 
6 00 

10 00 
8 00; 
8 CO! 

6 00: 
6 00 
10 00 ! 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 oo; 

6 00| 
6 00: 



■18 



.274 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Sixth District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Inspection. Operating- Mine. 



Location of Mine. 



Sept. 21, 
Oct. 15, 
_Feb. 9, 

July 26', 
Oct. 20, 
Jan. 21, 
April 13, 
Oct. la, 
Jan. 29, 
Nov. 12. 
Mar. 16, 
July 21. 
Nov. 29. 
Feb. 25, 
Mar. 9, 
Nov. 5, 
June 22, 
Oct. 4. 
-Jan. 25, 
April 27, 
Feb. 4, 
-Aufj. 2, 
Nov. 26, 
F'eb. 17. 
May 26, 
Aug. 27, 
Oct. 19, 
Jan. 21, 
Sept. -SS, 
Nov. 6. 
Feb. 14, 
May 18, 
July 22, 
JSTov. 1, 
Feb. 5, 
April 16, 
Nov. 2, 
Feb. 2. 
May 5, 
Sept. 23. 
Nov. 6, 
Feb. 14, 
May 18, 
July 9, 
Sept. 1, 
Mar. 18, 
July 13, 
Oct. 13, 
Feb. 12, 
July 12, 
Mar. 22, 
June 18, 
Oct. 16, 
Sept. 25. 
Nov. 9, 
Jan. 15, 
April 21, 
Dec. 30, 
Sept. 22, 
Oct. 15, 
Feb. 8, 
May 12. 
May 19. 
Sept. 21. 
Oct. 5, 
Feb. 15, 
May 2, 
Nov. 22, 



1897 Oakland Coal Co. 

1897 

1898! 

1898 

1897 Odin Coal Co 

18^7 " 



1^97 O'Fallon C. & M, Co . 

1898 

18y7|Ogden & Bro.. Wm.. 

1897 Pettins:er & Davis. .'.' 

1897J ;; ;; .. 



1898iPistor, Wm 

1897lRatican, Joyce & Greive . 



Reinecke, Conrad. 



1898 Reinecke Coal Co... 
1898 Ruby Coal & M. Co. 

1897: Salem Coal Co 

1897: " 

1898; " 



1897:Saudoval Coal Co. 



18.^8 

18971 Skellett Coal Co. 

18971 



Somers, Jos. 



1897 Sorento P. & M. Co. 

1898 



1897 Summit Coal Co 

18i'7i 



1897 Superior C. & M. Co. 

1897 



1897 Taylor, Jos... 

1897] ;; 

1897TirreCoalCo 



Tirre & Sons. Wm 

Trenton C. L. & P. Co 



Voge, Henry 

Walnut Hill Coal Co. 



Walnut Valley Coal Co. 
West End Coal Co 



Wonderly Coal Co . 



Belleville 21 

40 



O'Fallon.. 
Rentchler 
Centralia . 



Millstadt ... 
Collinsville 



Belleville. 



Casey ville. 
Salem 



Sandoval . 
Belleville.' 



Smithboro. 



Sorento. 
Birkner. 



Kinmundy. 
O'Fallon..; 
Lenzburg. . 



Trenton 



Staunton 
Birkner.. 



Belleville 



lEdwardsville 



Total $1 , 434 00 



$6 00 
6 00 

6 oo; 

6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 

e 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00; 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 ! 
8 001 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 OU 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
600 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
800 
10 00 
6 00 
6 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 



STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



SEVENTH DISTRICT. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm, Company or Person 
Operating ^line. 


Location of Mine. 


i. 

If 


Inspection fee 
charged. 


1 

tr.'a 

a c 


Dec. 8,1897 


Barber & Bro., C 


Tamaroa 


20 
21 
14 
16 
10 


S6 00. 
6 OOi. 

6 ooL 




Jan. 31.189^ 






Nov. 2, 1897 


Barnard, Wm 


Chester 




Feb. 16.1898 




6 00.. 
6 00 . 




April 16.1898 








Sept. 8, 1897 


Berry <fe Bro., Jno. .J 


Equality 


SG 00 


July 14.1897 


Big Muddy Coal ,fc Coke Co 


DeSoto 


105 
105 
45 

55 

80 
103 
130 
125 
24 
45 
30 
25 

£ 

250 
250 
50 
4C 
26 
14 
18 
8 
36 
50 
58 
90 
35 
30 
48 
11 
120 
125 
80 
35 
40 
31 
28 
46 
48 

IS 

100 

85 

« 

60 
80 
100 
75 
80 
30 
36 
44 
32 
55 
18 
26 
251 
36 
36 
50 
.50l 


8 00 . 
8 00 . 
G 00|. 
8 00 . 

8 00. 

8 00|. 
10 00 . 
10 00;. 

6 OOj. 

G OOI. 

6 00'. 

G 00 . 

6 00;. 

10 00 . 

10 ool . 

10 00'. 
G 00'. 
C 001. 
G 00 . 
6 00'. 
G 00'. 




Aug. 19.1897 




Nov. 29,1897 








April 7,1898 








Aug. 14.1897 


Big Muddy C & I. Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Harrison mine 


Murphysboro 

Herrins Prairie.. 

Murphysboro ' 

Sparta . 




Nov. 15,1897 




Jan. 24.1898 


" 




M;iy 3, 1898 






Oct. 6, 1897 


No.6 

No.G 

No. 7 

No!7;;;;;;;;;;";;;;;;;;;;;::;;:;;;! 
No.5 

No.5 

No. 5 




June 4.1898 




Oct. 11, 1897 




Jan. 12,1898 




May 10.1898 




Nov. 3, 1897 




Feb. 14. 1898 




April 27.1898 




Sept. 21,1897 


Boyd Coal & Coke Co. No.l 

No.l 

No.l 

No. 2 

No.2 




Jan. 27, 1898 






May 2, 1898 






Dec. 3, 1897 






Mar. 16.1898 






May 2,1898 


No. 2 






July 20,1897 


Brown <fc Son, G. W 


Pinckneyviile.... 

.... 
Cutler 


6 OOI. 
6 00 . 
8 00 . 
8 00 . 
6 00. 
6 00 . 
G 00'. 
6 00 . 
8 00 . 
10 00 . 

8oo;.. 

G 00i.. 




Nov. 2, 1897 




Feb. 1,1898 






April 14,1898 






Nov. 2, 1897 


Brown <k Harwell 




Feb. 16,1898 






April 14,1898 


" 




June 3,1898 


Brueggemann, -J. F 

Carterville Coal Co 


Nashville 




Oct. 25, 1897 


Carterville 

Coulterville...!.. 
Marion 




Feb. 22. 189S 




June 14,1898 






Oct. 28,1897 


Coulterville M. Co 




Jan. 27,1898 


G 00 .. 
G 00 .. 
6 00 .. 
6 00 .. 

6 oo!.. 

6 00 .. 
6 00 

8 oo;.. 

8 00 . . 
8 00 . . 
8 00 .. 
8 00 .. 

8 00 .. 
8 00 .. 
10 00 .. 

5 00 . . 
8 00 .. 
G 00,.. 
G 00 . . 

6 00 . . 
G 00 

8 001.. 




April 18, 1898 






July 7.1897 


Crab Orchard Coal Co 




Dec. 10, 1897 






Mar. 7. 1898 






June 21,1898 








July 31,1897 
Dec. 30,1897 


Davenport Coal Co 


Harrisburg 


34 00 


Mar. 28.1898 
Oct. 13. 1897 


Davis <t Greenwood (3. Co 




Jan. 18,1898 






April 12,1898 




' • 




July 8,1897 


DuQuoin Union C. Co., DuQuoin— 
Browning mine 


DuCJuoin. 




Oct. 20, 1897 






April 20, 1898 








Oct. 12, 1897 








Jan. 19,1898 


Egyptian mine 






Oct. 18, 1897 






Jan. 17, 1898 


• • 




April 13, 1898 








July 9. 1897 


Eiiuality Coal Co 






Dec. 29,1897 






June 23,1898 




• • 




Sept. 23, 1897 
Dec. 1,1897 


(iart.side Coal Co. No. i 

No.l 


Murphysboro 


6 00 . . 




Feb. 7, 1898 
April 4,1898 
Aug. 18,1897 


No.l 


6 00 .. 
6 00 .. 
6 00 .. 

6 oo; . . 




No. 1 




No. 3 




Sept. 29. 18971 ■ • No. 3 





276 



STATISTICS OF LABOR. 



Seventh District, Statement — Continued. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a 
o 

a 

If 


1 
It 


S 

a 
o 

■■§ 


Dec. 1. 1897 


Gartside Coal Co. No. 3 

No. 3 

No. 3 


Murphysboro 


50 
66 
60 
85 
75 
75 
30 
32 
20 
32 
40 
10 
23 
124 
170 
200 
130 
125 
40 
135 
135 
45 
12 
2C 
20 
50 
50 
65 
75 
35 
24 
40 
35 
32 
35 
33 
30 
27 
20 
13 
40 
66 
45 
75 
52 
57 
100 
200 
200 
200 
29 
40 
35 
24 
35 
40 
48 


$6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 09 
6 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
8 00 
8 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 

10 00 
10 00 
10 00 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 




Feb. 7. 1898 




April 4, 1898 




Oct. 30, 1897 


No.4 

No.4 

No.4 




Jan. 24,1898 




May 4, 1898 




Dec. 2, 1897 


Goalby & Son, G . W 




Feb. 15, 1898 






June 27.1898 








Oct. 28, 1897 


Goddard, Wm 


Tilden 




April 18 1898 






Mar. 28,1898 


Harrisburgr Coal Co 


Harrisburg 




June 23,1898 




July 26.1897 


Horn Colliery Co 




Nov. 18,1897 






Jan. 19. 1898 








May 23,1898 




' ' 




July 17, 1897 


I. C. Coal and Salt Co 






Dec. 18, 1897 






Feb. 24, 1898 








May 26, 1898 


' • 


• ' 




Feb. 18, 1898 


Illinois Fuel & Power Co. No. 1 

No. 1 

No. 3 

No. 3 

Jupiter Coal Co 


Sparta 




April 15,1898 






Mar. 15 1898 


• ' 




May 25. 1898 







July 15 1897 


DuQuoin 




July 17, 1897 






Nov. 8, 1897 


• ' 


' • 




Jan. 18, 1898 








April 21,1898 




' ' 






Kuhn, Adam 






Jan 29, 1898 






May 18,1898 








Au?. 9,1897 


Little Muddy Coal Co 


Percy 




Dec. 20, 1897 






Feb. 19, 1898 


• • 






April 16 1898 








Oct. 29, 1897 


Mason Coal Co 




$12 00 


Feb. 17 1898 


•• 




April 25, 1898 


> • 






Oct. 5 1897 


Morris Bros. & Co 


DuQuoin.. 




Feb. 25, 1898 






April 22 1898 




' ' 




Dec. 7, 1897 


Mt. Vernon Coal Co 


Mt. Vernon 

HallidayboroV.'.;;; 




Mar. 8, 1898 




May 27. 1898 








Muddy Valley M. &: Mfg. Co 




Nov. 29.1897 




Mar. 24.1898 


' ' 




May 5 1898 






Aug. 30,1897 


Murray. Hugh 




Dec. 9 1897 






Mar. 22,1898 










Murphy sboro B. M. Coal Co 






Oct 29 1897 






Feb. 17, 1898 








April 25 1898 




' • 




Mar. 26.1898 


Myer, John 

Ohio & Miss. Valley C. & M. Co. No. 1 
No. 1 
No. 1 
No. 1 
No. 2 
No.2 
No. 2 

Ohio Valley Coal & Coke Co 




6 00 


July 7. 1897 
Oct 4 1897 




72 
115 
68 
90 
14 
20 
30 
40 
50 
40 


8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 














.June 25 1898 












Mar 7 1898 






June ^5 1898 








> • 


IS 00 


Ma'' 9 1898 














Mar 9 1898 


Okawville W S Coal Co 


Okawville 


6 00 


Oct. 26, 1897 


Pittsburg Plate Glass Co 

Pope Mhiiug Co 




60 

18 
12 


800 
6 00 
6 00 


16 00 








April 12,1898 








STATEMENT OF INSPECTION FEES. 



277 



Seventh District, Statement — Concluded. 



Date of 
Inspection. 


Name of Firm. Company or Person 
Operating Mine. 


Location of Mine. 


a . 

«MT3 

if 


ii 


I- 

a 
o 

a p. 


Aug:. 17. 1897 


Randolph Coke & Coal Co.. No. 2.... 

No. 2.... 

No. 1.... 

No. 3.... 

Rosboro Coal Co 

Sato Coa_l_& M. Co 


Sparta 


28 
35 
48 

i 
S 

26 
270 
260 
230 
36 
35 
35 
35 
17 

i 

18 
11 
10 
50 
75 
9 
26 
12 
12 

12 
22 
40 
60 

^ 
55 
55 
40 
47 
46 


IS 

6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

%z 

IZ 

6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
10 00 
10 00 
10 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
8 00 
8 00 
6 00 
6 00 
6 00 

$1,268 00 




Oct 15 1897 






Dec. 2, 1897 


Perry 




Dec. 3, 1897 


Rosboro 




Feb. 18, 1898 


Percy 




July 19,1897 






Dec. 24 1897 






Feb. 17,1898 
April 25, 1898 
July 20 1897 




' • 










Sf>r»tt-Wil«r>nrnainn Mn 1 


Cartervilie 




Oct. 23,1897' " No. 1 

Jan. 11.1898 " No. 1 

June 13.1898, " No. 1 

Jan. 12,18981 " No. 2 




April 6,1898' " No. 2 






Aug. 23,1897 
Dec. 27,1897 
Mar. 25.1898 
April 14. 1898 
Oct. 5,1897 
Feb. 25.1898 
April 22, 1898 
Dec. 15, 1897 


St. Louis BigMuddy C. Co 


Carterville 


$70 00 


' ' • ' 








Sun Coal & Coke Co 














Snnprior Ooal Cc 






Oct. 22, 1897|TaTnaroa. flnllierv Oo. 


Tamaroa 




Jan. 31,1898 
Oct. 14,1897 
Feb. 1, 1898 
June 2, 1898 
Dec. 6, 1897 
Mar. 16,1898 
Aug. 30,1897 
Dec. 9,1897 
Mar. 22,1898 
April 28, 1898 
Aug. 14,1897 
Nov. 15,1897 
Feb. 8, 1898 
Aug, 9, 1897 
Dec. 21,1897 








Turner & Faust Co 


Pinckneyville. ... 
Sparta . . . 








Valley & Gulf Coal Co 










Nashville 


18 00 




•' 










Wild &Gill 


Murphysboro 

:: '■■'■■ 

wiiiisviiie....:::; 

Johnson City 




WiUis.^D.P 








Willis Coal & M. Co 






Jan. 1,1898 






April 15, 1898 
Sept. 20,1897 






Williamson Co. Coal Co 




Nov. 1, 1897 




May 17 1898 








\\ 




Mar. 9, 1898 








Total ! 


$210 00 











278 



STATISTICS or LABOR. 



Recapitulation of the Reports of the State hispedors of Mines ^ 
of Inspections Made and Fees Charged and Paid for the Year 
Ending July 1. 1898. 



Districts. 


Number 
of mines 

in 
district. 


Number 

of mines 

inspected. 


1 

Total , Total 

number of amount of 

inspec- inspection 

tions. fees. 


Total 
amount of 
fees paid. 


First 

Second 

Third 

Fourth 

Fifth 

Sixth 


86 1 71 
184! 76 
217 80 
94 55 
79 67 
98 S1 


*192 $1.438 00 
tl60 1. 174 CO 
174 1,124 00 
11351 1,026 00 
161 1,350 00 
203 1,434 00 
184: 1,268 00 


$468 00 
816 00 
60 00 

350 eo 

314 00 


Seventh. 


123 


66 


210 00 






Totals 


881 


496 


l,209i $8,814 00 


S2. 384 00 



*Seven inspections on account of fatal accidents. 
tOne inspection on account of fatal accident. 
ITwo inspections on account of fatal accidents. 



Recapitulation of the Reports of the State Inspectors of Mines of 
Inspections Made at the Different Rates of Fees Charged,. 
Number of Inspections and Average Number of Men to Each 
Inspection. 



Districts. 



Inspections at $6.00. 



Num- 
ber of 
inspec- 
tions. 



Aver- 
age 
num- 
ber of 
men. 



Amount 
of fees. 



Inspections at $8.00. 



Num- 
ber of 
inspec- 
tions. 



Aver- 
age 
num- 
ber of 
men. 



Amount 
of Fees. 



Inspections at $10.00. 



lions, jjjgjj 



lAmount 
of fees. 



First I 

Second i 

Third I 

Fourth ; 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh i 

Totals 



$666 00 t 
528 00 i 
828 00 i 
396 00 i 
294 09 
744 00 
720 00 



$152 00! 
296 00 i 
256 00 ! 



$176 00 



30 
32 
50 
46 


76 

83 

I 


240 00 
256 00 
400 00 
368 00 


246 


79 


$968 00 



$620 00 
350 00 
40 00 
390 00 
800 00 
290 00 

180 oa 



$670 OCt